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Early pedal box rebuild - check my work


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I have an early car (1-663-497) pedal box with the horse shoe mechanical clutch mechanism. All came to together fairly straightforward however I'm curious about the clutch spring not returning the pedal once depressed (mind watching the video below). Perhaps it's not truly functional in that manner until its back in place and connected to its hydraulics? I also don't love that the horseshoe isn't perfectly straight but in checking real oem looks like i'm missing a circlip #22. Anything else look out of sorts? Appreciate the second and third sets of eyes.

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Series 1, 1969 2002

Instagram: joseiden_bmwerke

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There should be a big spring on the shaft of the clutch pedal which is missing

 

I think you're referring to the hairpin spring that came on later cars. It would be at the far left of the pedal lineup.

This pedal box pre-dates that configuration and uses the early style clutch return spring (a horseshoe shaped cam that attaches to an adjustable spring).

 

that said, the spring you're referring to did come in my refresh kit from @BLUNT. Wondering if I can swap them out?

Series 1, 1969 2002

Instagram: joseiden_bmwerke

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2 hours ago, BLUNT said:

I've not personally done a box that early but the spring should work I think. How's that for confidence? 

You've met my expectations of you!

 

:P

Ray

Stop reading this! Don't you have anything better to do?? :P
Two running things. Two broken things.

 

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23 hours ago, Joesprocket said:

This pedal box pre-dates that configuration and uses the early style clutch return spring (a horseshoe shaped cam that attaches to an adjustable spring).

My later '69 has this setup--it was used up to VIN 1665200--and I've had to do some repairs on it.  The clutch pedal return spring is part #24 in the illustration above, and rarely breaks.  What happens is either the two holes in the horseshoe (part #23) wear through or, more commonly, the peg welded to the pedal arm itself wears out and then breaks.  Both the horseshoe holes and the peg were badly worn on my car; I was able to buy a new horseshoe, and then took the clutch pedal and welded up the peg and filed it down 'till the horseshoe fit over it. 

 

Alternatively, you could sleeve the worn peg and press steel bushings into the worn holes on the horseshoe or have a fabrication shop laser/water cut you a new horseshoe if they're NLA.  

 

I did a column on this repair; PM me and I'll send you a copy.

 

Cheers

mike

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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@Mike Self just tried to send a message to you but the site said Mike Self can't receive messages.

 

I will say, all of the parts coming out of the box are in great shape after getting them cleaned up. The horseshoe showed some lite wear but when reinstalling I reversed it's orientation so perhaps this helps it wear evenly. The peg showed no signs of wear.

 

My biggest question (which could be difficult for someone to weigh in on i suppose unless their box is out of the car or they did this recently) but after assembly, the clutch pedal showed no attempt at "springing back" when i pushed it in. In fact, I could push it all the way in and it wouldnt return at all. Is this right? Wondering perhaps the hydraulics is what helps the pedal return; not just the spring?

Edited by Joesprocket

Series 1, 1969 2002

Instagram: joseiden_bmwerke

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Bubbling this back to the top to see if I can get a few other "early pedal box" users to weigh in. 

 

Should the clutch pedal show some kinda of spring back motion with this early horse shoe set up? When the pedal is engaged it's not a linear pull on the spring. The video pretty much tells the tale.

 

@Mike Self tried to DM you for the article you mentioned but got a response that reads "Mike Self cannot receive messages"

 

Thanks everyone. 

Series 1, 1969 2002

Instagram: joseiden_bmwerke

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If you have the big spring (p/n 24 in the diagram) connected between the horseshoe and the bolt (p/n 25) with the hole in its head to accept the spring, the pedal should pop back.  It might take some lubrication on the pedal shaft to make this happen.  Also, on those early (pre 1665200 cars) there's a second return spring at the slave cylinder that pulls the slave cylinder piston back to its "at rest" position.  And that pushrod is adjustable.  Neither of these facts are mentioned in the owners manual, and are carryovers from the 1600/very early 2002 mechanical clutch linkage.  

 

Stretching that spring from horseshoe to bolt is a PITA, but it can be done. 

 

mike

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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For future searchers of "annoying horseshoe mechanical clutch linkage". 

Maybe your peg and horseshoe is worn/busted or maybe you don't like the wimpy pedal return.

 

Based on my early pedal box reassembly you can remove the horseshoe design altogether and simply swap in the hairpin spring design as used in cars after VIN 1665200. The spring you need is part number 35 31 1 104 531 which is also included in Blunts pedal box refresh kit. Remember to grease the eye of the clutch MC and plug up any holes left by not using the OG design.

 

cheers

 

 

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Series 1, 1969 2002

Instagram: joseiden_bmwerke

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