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New guy looking for help


bahnstormer

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Can’t set ignition timing

I know it's not a 2002, but I figured this is the largest knowledge base I could find.

I have a ’75 Euro 520i with KF injected 2 liter M10, mechanical advance only on distributor.

 

Under light acceleration or at steady speed, there is a slight bucking or surging.

 

Since owning, I have replaced points, plugs, condenser, rotor, cap and wires.

 

Marty from H&R checked out the injection pump and made some adjustments. It runs much better than when I got it. He said it is still running a bit rich and suggested a rebuild.

 

Before I go that route, I want to exhaust all other possibilities. Problem is that I have only been able to set the ignition timing by feel. I believe the marks (either ball on flywheel or notch on front pulley) should line up at 2500 rpm. There is no way to hold a steady rpm; it just wanders up and down.

 

My question to you folks with more experience is: could there be a problem with the distributor advance (the plate with the points on it snaps right back when I rotate it and let it go and I wouldn’t know what else to do) or should I have the KF pump rebuilt (the 2500 rpm spec is right in the middle of the range where surging occurs).

 

Thanks for any advice you can give me.

Bruce

Me n Magnus.jpg

Edited by bahnstormer
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520i profile 2.jpg

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52 minutes ago, bahnstormer said:

Thanks for any advice you can give me.

 

First off, that car is a beauty.  The surge issue could be ignition, pump issues or vacuum leaks.  A worn out distributor will bounce the ball on the flywheel and make it hard to get a steady idle.  You can try to look for lateral play in the rotor shaft, it should be solid with no lateral movement of the shaft.  Before you send the pump out for work, I would test for vacuum leaks (carb cleaner spray around intake connections and hoses during idle and listen for surge in idle).  If it was my car, I would consider replacing the original distributor with a bluetooth unit from 123 Ignition, limitless timing curve options with your phone.  If that doesn't fix the issue. the pump or the related systems (warm-up regulator, linkage, etc. may be causing issues).

 

Mark92131

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1970 BMW 1600 (Nevada)

 

 

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Recommend you thoroughly  check for vacuum leaks

Probably not a bad idea to replace fuel filter if its been on there for awhile.

What a totally cool car!

You came to the right place

Edited by tech71
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76 2002 Survivor

71 2002 Franzi

85 318i  Doris

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Thanks for responding. Have already done:

new fuel filter

warm up regulator (I think that's the tuna can) is functioning

found no play in distributor shaft or linkage (10K miles since new)

pulls strong vacuum (one of my first thoughts) after I fooled with a few hoses

 

From what I gather mechanical advance alone does not have have much of a curve.

I was thinking of a programmable distributor, either PerTronix or 123Ignition. Any recommendations?

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23 hours ago, bahnstormer said:

either PerTronix or 123Ignition. Any recommendations?

 

The pertronix is not programable, the 123 Ignition bluetooth version is programable from your phone, the other models of 123 Ignition distributors use a USB cable to load different advance curves and then switch between them.  Many of us here have used the 123 Ignition distributors with good success.  There was some early issues with oil leakage, but subsequently corrected by the distributor for an additional fee.

 

Mark92131

Edited by Mark92131
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1970 BMW 1600 (Nevada)

 

 

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36 minutes ago, bahnstormer said:

I was thinking of a programmable distributor, either PerTronix or 123Ignition. Any recommendations?

If you don't want to bring your phone or laptop into it,  123Ignition also sells "switchable" versions with 16 different advance curves preprogrammed.  All you need is a slotted screwdriver a flashlight/glasses.  Excellent ride you have there.

Eric

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2 hours ago, bahnstormer said:

I was thinking of a programmable distributor, either PerTronix or 123Ignition. Any recommendations?

I love my 123.  Right now it is doing nothing because I did a crank trigger for my EFI.   When I was running my carb setup it was great for dialling in a nice idle and great pickup. 

 

 

"Goosed" 1975 BMW 2002

 

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3 hours ago, Mark92131 said:

Many of us here have used the 123 Ignition distributors with good success.  There was some early issues with oil leakage, but subsequently corrected by the manufacturer.

 

You'll need to specify that you want the spiral cut shaft and pay an extra $70.

 

123TUNEplus-collage_374__91600.154249076
123IGNITIONUSA.COM

Your US Distributor of electronic ignition distributors for classic cars 123ignition

 

   

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If the engine's fluctuating, watch your timing light while it does.

 

The mechanical advances wear out and get early as well as sticky,

bipolar, and sometimes overzealous.

You'll see that in the timing light's moving around erratically.

What you should see is a smooth advance and retard as revs go up and down.

If you can find the mark on the front pulley, that's an easier way to see what it's up to.

 

In your shoes, I'd fix up your mechanical distributor first...

 

t

 

 

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"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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23 hours ago, Mark92131 said:

 

There was some early issues with oil leakage, but subsequently corrected by the manufacturer.

 

Mark92131

Where did you hear that? It's incorrect unless things have changed in the past 3 months.

 

The U.S. distributor, 123ignitionUSA LLC took it upon himself to have the spiral shafts machined; the issue has yet to be recognized by the manufacturer.

 

Cheers,

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Ray

Stop reading this! Don't you have anything better to do?? :P
Two running things. Two broken things.

 

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I'm with Toby, with your distributors low mileage I would fit your choice of pointless ignition and run it, you'll save money and theres not much to improve on the factory tii curve.

If everybody in the room is thinking the same thing, then someone is not thinking.

 

George S Patton 

Planning the Normandy Break out 1944

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