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Fuse Box - what lies beneath?


PhilC

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Has anyone developed a modern replacement for the fusebox?

It seems to be a right old mess under there and with short tails it seems to be a nightmare waiting to happen if I removed it to assess whether it’s a worthwhile project or not?

Phil

1975 1602 with an M42 engine.

Project thread http://www.02forum.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=14853#p107713

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Nothing that I've seen, either.

 

BMW loved that (dumb) system for far too long-

the E30's are done essentially the same way.

 

On the other hand, they've held up far better than most

other vehicles, so if you're not having problems, out of sight is

out of mind!

 

I guess it's 'vintage charm'.

 

Far better than the wiring on Saabs, though!

 

t

 

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"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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I might send Jonny at Classic Retrofit an email. I know him from my Porsche days and he loves a challenge. I think there is enough of a market in the US and SE Asia to make him think about it. Worth checking his website out if you have a classic Porsche.

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Phil

1975 1602 with an M42 engine.

Project thread http://www.02forum.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=14853#p107713

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23 minutes ago, TobyB said:

BMW loved that (dumb) system for far too long-

the E30's are done essentially the same way.

But at least the E30s use blade fuses, and plenty of 'em, not the six or twelve cartridge fuses found on 2002s.  Blade fuses aren't nearly as prone to corrosion as the cartridges...

 

And if you need more circuits, it's easy enough to add an auxiliary fuse box (preferably under the dash) that uses modern blade fuses.

 

mike

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'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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Yes, it was part of the model-71 changes. 

 

pre April 1971 had the slim 6-fuse box

post April 1971 had the 12-fuse box

 

There were lots of nuances in the wiring over the production years.

 

@pato2002 made a cool option a couple years ago.

https://www.bmw2002faq.com/forums/topic/203932-ultimate-relays-and-fuses-upgrade/page/2/#comments

 

https://www.bmw2002faq.com/blogs/entry/1896-fuse-block-upgrade/

 

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10 minutes ago, AceAndrew said:

Yes, it was part of the model-71 changes. 

 

pre April 1971 had the slim 6-fuse box

post April 1971 had the 12-fuse box

 

There were lots of nuances in the wiring over the production years.

 

@pato2002 made a cool option a couple years ago.

https://www.bmw2002faq.com/forums/topic/203932-ultimate-relays-and-fuses-upgrade/page/2/#comments

 

https://www.bmw2002faq.com/blogs/entry/1896-fuse-block-upgrade/

 

Thanks, that’s very helpful.

Phil

1975 1602 with an M42 engine.

Project thread http://www.02forum.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=14853#p107713

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8 hours ago, PhilC said:

it seems to be a nightmare waiting to happen if I removed it

You have no idea the shit storm that could create for you, think hard, very hard before taking that action.

If everything electrical works and rodents have not built a housing project in that space, leave it be.

Buy  ceramic fuses, a new cover, clean the tabs and thank the car gods for your good fortune.

Edited by tech71
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76 2002 Survivor

71 2002 Franzi

85 318i  Doris

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15 hours ago, tech71 said:

You have no idea the shit storm that could create for you, think hard, very hard before taking that action.

If everything electrical works and rodents have not built a housing project in that space, leave it be.

Buy  ceramic fuses, a new cover, clean the tabs and thank the car gods for your good fortune.


+1

 

Choose your battles wisely. Despite its appearances, it’s not a known problem area, even 50 years down the road!

 

If you have a “problem” with the fuseholder, 99 out of 100 “fixes”consist of giving each of your six/twelve fuses a twist to ensure it’s making good contact… 😯

 

Regards,

 

Steve

 

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1976 2002 Polaris, 2742541 (original owner)

1973 2002tii Inka, 2762757 (not-the-original owner)

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My car is an early '68 1600-2 which had the usual 6 fuses and a poor condition/much modified wiring harness.  I decided early in the rebuild process that it was going to get a better electrical system. 

 

First attempt, install a 12 fuse box with matching harness in good condition from a 12 fuse parts car.  The 02's sheet metal is  different between 6 and 12 fuse cars, and without modification, you cannot put a 12 fuse box in an 6 fuse car.  I tried, it won't fit.  I then looked far and wide for a larger fuse box that could fit in the same space.  Nope, nothing that would fit above the existing sheet metal. I toured several junk yards several times in the hope of finding something that could be made to work.  I even considered a blend of a fabricated spacer or 3d printed parts and commercially available fuse box parts.  Nothing found that would fit.

 

I finally re-wired the entire car with "distributed" fuses- most under the instrument cluster, but with the heavy under-hood loads fused in the engine compartment (electric fan, headlights, horn).  I only re-used the harness wiring that went back to the trunk from under the instrument panel and special connectors for things like the wiper motor.

 

It was a LOT of work.  None of the many wiring diagrams online and in the big blue book matched my car's original harness exactly.    The firewall hole under the instrument panel is a choke point for wiring (so was the little area under the original fuse box, but not in my case since I didn't put any wiring there).  Fitting a new, quality fuse box and the necessary terminal strips under the instrument cluster was barely possible.  I essentially built a wiring harness in place which also made it difficult from a physical work point of view, but I can't imagine how it would be possible to design and build a harness and then install it without a lot of wasted wire length.  Did I mention it was a LOT of work?  Would I do it with a 12 fuse car with wiring in working condition?  No.  Would I do it again in a similar situation?  No comment.   Would I do it again for someone else, for any amount of cash? Nah.  But, I have a (so far) reliable electrical system which is fully documented and which will never need it's fused cleaned and polished.  The original fuse box location is also a perfect place to install a plaque commemorating the rebuild of the car.

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the original fuse box has some common feeds to the hot side of fuses.  some aftermarket fuse boxes  have no common feeds, some have one common feed for all.  you would need to duplicate the scheme of the original fuse box with the former via wire jumpers

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