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Decisions, Decisions


ingramlee

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I've purchased "everything" I need for a 5-speed swap. What I don't have is motivation. I mean why take out a perfectly functioning 4-speed. I did a 50-mile drive today and I really like the 4 speed and highway driving with it doesn't bother me, heck I've done 3 trips 700 plus miles one way to Mid-America and wasn't bothered by the 4-speed in the least. I'm really considering selling all of this 5-speed stuff and sticking with what I have. I know it's ultimately my decision but interested in the FAQ's thoughts.

(1973 Fjord Blue 037) Vin 2588314- Build date February 6th, 1973- delivered to Hoffman Motors NYC February 8th.

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5 minutes ago, '76mintgrün'02 said:

I'd sell it.  I'm content with my four speed and 3.9 differential.

I have a 3.64 diff. Maybe I should look for a 3.9

(1973 Fjord Blue 037) Vin 2588314- Build date February 6th, 1973- delivered to Hoffman Motors NYC February 8th.

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I like the extra grunt from the 3.90.  I can tolerate high rpms on the highway, especially since most of my driving is done on the back roads.  I did take a road trip to South Dakota last summer and got a good dose of all day I-90 driving.  I covered 900 miles in 14 hours on the last day and felt like continuing on to the coast when I got home.  I found the high revs exhilarating, but it might have been challenging if I'd had a co-pilot.  I'm not opposed to five speeds, just too frugal and lazy to pursue one.

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I'm facing the same dilemma with Franzi, my 71 currently being revived from near death.

Have a 245 and 240 I could install but it will for sure slow progress down, pretty sure it has a 364 diff so everything turns a bit slower than a 390.

Survivor, my 76 with 390 diff has been fitted with a 240 and I like it a lot, especially on the freeway.

2 hours ago, ingramlee said:

I have a 3.64 diff. Maybe I should look for a 3.9

I wouldn't if you keep the 4 speed

Edited by tech71
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76 2002 Survivor

71 2002 Franzi

85 318i  Doris

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Another fan of the 4 speed/3.64 here.  I've had 02s both ways.  There's nothing wrong with the overdrive/3.90 combo - I just prefer the 1:1 top gear in an 02, and have done plenty of 500+ mile road trips that way.  Maybe I'd feel differently if it was my only car and I was commuting a bunch of miles on the interstate.

 

Like he says though, if you find yourself looking for that overdrive gear, do the swap.

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1971 2002ti

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9 minutes ago, tech71 said:

I'm facing the same dilemma with Franzi, my 71 currently being revived from near death.

Have a 245 and 240 I could install but it will for sure slow things down, pretty sure it has a 364 diff so everything turns a bit slower than a 390.

Survivor, my 76 with 390 diff has been fitted with a 240 and I like it a lot, especially on the freeway.

I wouldn't if you keep the 4 speed

Even if I found a 3.90 I would keep the 3.64 just because.

(1973 Fjord Blue 037) Vin 2588314- Build date February 6th, 1973- delivered to Hoffman Motors NYC February 8th.

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2 minutes ago, ingramlee said:

I think I will do one more 1400-mile trip this year to Mid-America then decide to either do the swap or sell it all.

The 5-speed stuff that is, not the car. 😉

(1973 Fjord Blue 037) Vin 2588314- Build date February 6th, 1973- delivered to Hoffman Motors NYC February 8th.

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In the beginning the euro tiis had 3.45…if you want something more long-legged you could do that.  Or the 3.91 if you want to go the other way.  

 

The longer I have more car, the less I want to screw with it.  I’m more focused now on just keeping it driveable and enjoyable.

 

Scott

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02ing since '87

'72 tii Euro  //  '21 330i x //  '14 BMW X5  //  '12 VW Jetta GLI

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1 hour ago, Schnellvintage said:

I like the 5th gear with the 3.64.  The 4th gears are the same and enjoy the options and the mileage on long distances, that is only my opinion.  I drove a 4spd with a 3.90 for years without issue. I just made sure my engine was quiet enough the enjoy the revs.

Ditto here. Although I live in the mountains in Santa Cruz county, it is hard to get anywhere outside of the area without running on the freeway. I am so much happier running at mid-3K RPMs at freeway speeds than at 4K +. Maintaining the same RPMs in gears 1-4 is a plus.

Chris B.

'73 ex-Malaga

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