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Trouble selecting 1st gear


Daily02
Go to solution Solved by Lorin,

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With the motor running it is very difficult getting into 1st gear from a stop. Shifting while moving is good. It is just difficult getting into 1st at a stop light. 

One thing that helps is to put it in 2nd then into 1st, but it still takes a lot of force. 

 

Regards

 

Dono

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Gearbox is still spinning, that's why it's hard to select... Could be pilot bearing as @uais uggests or it could be failing clutch hydraulics (not disengaging properly) or even a clutch plate binding on the input shaft...all three will cause gearbox to spin and make engaging 1st & reverse quite difficult. Once moving in the other gears it's much less noticeable...in fact if you practice you can change gear without the clutch and without damaging the synchros...

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One other possibility to consider:  the shifter "tower" (the bracket that holds the shifter and is bolted to the tranny casing) is so fastened with "metalastic" bushings (rubber bonded to metal).  They disintegrate over time (and/or the bolts work loose) and allow excessive bracket movement, making it difficult to engage particularly first and reverse.  Worth crawling under the car and observing while another moves the shift lever into all five (4 forward, 1 reverse) gears.  Pay attention to the places where bracket meets tranny case.

 

mike

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This is one possibility.

 

I had the same issue a few years back. In my case, the clutch slave cylinder was on its way out. Had it replaced and its never been an issue since. 

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+1, check your clutch hydraulics first.

 

And don't force it- you're murtilating your synchro rings and cones...

 

In a pinch, switch off, select first, restart with the clutch in, off you go.

For second, match revs.

 

t

 

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"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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1 hour ago, SydneyTii said:

I changed my gearbox oil, I couldn’t believe the difference.

+1--especially on gearboxes with the BW-style synchros  (the later ones, after 1970 or so).  Mine was very balky shifting into first, and a friend convinced me to try some Redline MTL.  Smoothed it right out.  I was surprised that oil could make that much difference.

 

mike

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'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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16 hours ago, Mike Self said:

One other possibility to consider:  the shifter "tower" (the bracket that holds the shifter and is bolted to the tranny casing) is so fastened with "metalastic" bushings (rubber bonded to metal).  They disintegrate over time (and/or the bolts work loose) and allow excessive bracket movement, making it difficult to engage particularly first and reverse.  Worth crawling under the car and observing while another moves the shift lever into all five (4 forward, 1 reverse) gears.  Pay attention to the places where bracket meets tranny case.

 

mike


This was the problem I had.  One of my bracket bolts had backed nearly all the way out - once I tightened everything up I was able to shift normally again. 

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  • Solution

Reverse is not synchronized like the rest of the gears. If you have an input shaft that is still spinning from one of the previously mentioned possibilities it is easy to feel it. 
 

With the engine idling, depress the clutch and wait for a few seconds. With the clutch still depressed slowly and gently move the shift lever towards reverse and you will feel the teeth of the reverse gear rotating past the fixed gear you are trying to push into it. 

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22 hours ago, Son of Marty said:

Did you use loc-tite on them?

No. I guess I expressed myself poorly. The rubber was almost gone because the reverse light switch leaked and got oil all over it. The mount was still there doing nothing. I replaced the switch.

I did a check out on the clutch hydraulics, and things look good there. The MTL is on its way from Summit Racing. I'm really hoping this is the solution. 

 

Regards

 

Dono

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