Jump to content
  • When you click on links to various merchants on this site and make a purchase, this can result in this site earning a commission. Affiliate programs and affiliations include, but are not limited to, the eBay Partner Network.

New to me 72 2002tii - what maintenance to do first?


Pablo M

Recommended Posts

Getting delivery of my new-to-me 1972 2002tii on Monday (from TN, to SoCal). Bought from second owner, but it’s sat for the last 10 years with only about 400 miles in that time. Getting full records of maintenance but nothings been done in 10 years. 
I figure most rubber needs replacing. Starting with tires and brake lines (stainless steel). Timing belt and WP probably good idea (are m10’s interference engine like m20’s?). 
 

what else should I do? Goal is a second daily that’s a fun canyon/track car. 

2003 e39 M5 (daily)

1986 e30 325es (sons car)

1972 2002tii (fun daily alternative)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No timing belt to worry about, otherwise I agree that many rubber parts will need attention. Fuel tank will need some service, fuel pump likely will need replacement. But I would expect that after some simple prep on fuel and ignition it will start and run fine.

'59 Morris Minor, '67 Triumph TR4A, '68 Silver Shadow, '72 2002tii, '73 Jaguar E-Type,

'73 2002tii w/Alpina mods , '74 2002turbo, '85 Alfa Spider, '03 Lotus Elise

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, dlacey said:

No timing belt to worry about, otherwise I agree that many rubber parts will need attention. Fuel tank will need some service, fuel pump likely will need replacement. But I would expect that after some simple prep on fuel and ignition it will start and run fine.

Car runs fine as is. I’ve seen videos of it running as of tonight and seems solid. I’ll assess more in depth when I have it in hand. I’m most worried about cooling system really. 

2003 e39 M5 (daily)

1986 e30 325es (sons car)

1972 2002tii (fun daily alternative)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brake system will probably require the most attention and work. Presumably the brakes have seized so rebuilt calipers, fresh pads and shoes, new lines, etc. Master & slave cylinder inspect for leaking, replace if necessary. Drain and flush both the radiator and gas tank, inspect and replace any fuel lines that need doing so, same with radiator hoses & thermostat. Obviously new tires.

 

You said in a video that the car seems to run fine, so does that mean that the PO performed a basic tuneup? Did they inspect and test the ignition system at that time as well? If not, you obviously have to do all of those things and replace any parts that need doing so.

 

Regarding the gas tank, check the O-ring as well as the hoses in the trunk as they might very well have deteriorated, and if so, can not only cause gas to leak, but create quite a strong odor which will make its way to the interior cabin. This is a notorious issue with virtually all 02’s

 

Check/inspect lights, bulbs, dash cluster, horns.

 

Have fun…

'74 Sahara/Beige 2002 HS car, long, long ago...

'73 Polaris/Navy 2002 tii lost to Canada

'73 Malaga/Saddle 2002 current project

'73 Taiga/Black 2002 tii in my dreams

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Paul Wegweiser has a bunch of solid advice for reviving a dormant tii. He gave a fantastic presentation at 02 Fest about this a couple years back.

For instance ...
 

file.jpg
WWW.MAXIMILLIANBLOG.COM

- Hold Steady The beautiful cars we admire at car shows and auctions don't always start out beautiful. The "new car smell" for which many of us long, has often been replaced by rotting and brittle dried out horse hair (pssst! It's actually coconut husks on old BMWs!) and rodent...

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Replace the fuel lines from the tank forward, those are probably crusty and you dont want a fuel leak.

Flush the radiator and block, new coolant.

New brake fluid.

New Spark Plugs

Oil Change

 

That aught to be enough for you to then drive the vehicle and determine what else needs doing.

  • Like 1

1976 BMW 2002 Chamonix. My first love.

1972 BMW 2002tii Polaris. My new side piece.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Literally replace everything rubber in the engine compartment + brake system.

 

Even if it looks ok, unless you have a recent receipt for it being replaced. Yes it will add up a bit but not much in the big picture (I have no idea how much you paid but the advice is the same regardless).

 

You don't want to be stranded or worse, injured or even worse injure someone else because a brake line "looked ok".

 

It's fun too and is more time to bond with the car (unless you are paying someone else to do it).

 

~Jason

Edited by JsnPpp
  • Like 1

1973 2002tii (2764167), Baikal, sunroof, A/C, 5spd OD, 3.91 LSD, etc. Rebuild blog here!

In the past: Verona H&B 1973 2002tii (2762913); Malaga 1975 2002; White 1975 2002

--> Blog: Repro tii cold start relay;   --> If you need an Alpina A4 tuning manual, PM me!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, dlacey said:

No timing belt to worry about, otherwise I agree that many rubber parts will need attention. 

 

But the Kugelfischer pump has a rubber belt that should be examined.

  • Like 3

John in VA

'74 tii "Juanita"  '85 535i "Goldie"  '86 535i "M-POSSTR"  

'03 530i "Titan"  '06 330ci "ZHPY"

bmw_spin.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, John_in_VA said:

 

But the Kugelfischer pump has a rubber belt that should be examined.

 

if it sat for 10+ years, i'd just replace the belt along with all the fuel hoses (with a the correct fuel hoses) and replace the fuel filter by the radiator. 

  • Like 1

Colin K.

Malaga '72 tii

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone. I have some more info. 
-brakes were recently rebuilt and new fluid very recently. 
-mechanical fuel pump has been recently rebuilt. 
there were a few other things and he has a list for me. 
-he has all receipts AND the original window sticker, manuals, etc. coming with car. 
I got a video of them driving it onto the trailer this afternoon as well. 
once I get the receipts I’ll create a binder and log all the repairs. Then I’ll have a better idea. 
But I’m with you on rubber bits, particularly fuel lines. We’re very sensitive in our house as my sons e30 caught fire last July (he rebuilt it). 
I’ll be doing all the work myself.  
 

solid info. Thanks everyone. 

  • Like 3

2003 e39 M5 (daily)

1986 e30 325es (sons car)

1972 2002tii (fun daily alternative)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    Unveiling of the Neue Klasse Unveiled in 1961, BMW 1500 sedan was a revolutionary concept at the outset of the '60s. No tail fins or chrome fountains. Instead, what you got was understated and elegant, in a modern sense, exciting to drive as nearly any sports car, and yet still comfortable for four.   The elegant little sedan was an instant sensation. In the 1500, BMW not only found the long-term solution to its dire business straits but, more importantly, created an entirely new
    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    In 1966, BMW was practically unknown in the US unless you were a touring motorcycle enthusiast or had seen an Isetta given away on a quiz show.  BMW’s sales in the US that year were just 1253 cars.  Then BMW 1600-2 came to America’s shores, tripling US sales to 4564 the following year, boosted by favorable articles in the Buff Books. Car and Driver called it “the best $2500 sedan anywhere.”  Road & Track’s road test was equally enthusiastic.  Then, BMW took a cue from American manufacturers,
    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    BMW 02 series are like the original Volkswagen Beetles in one way (besides both being German classic cars)—throughout their long production, they all essentially look alike—at least to the uninitiated:  small, boxy, rear-wheel drive, two-door sedan.  Aficionados know better.   Not only were there three other body styles—none, unfortunately, exported to the US—but there were some significant visual and mechanical changes over their eleven-year production run.   I’ve extracted t
  • Upcoming Events

  • Supporting Vendors

×
×
  • Create New...