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Paint and bodywork guidance


JohnP_02
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I am about to send off the 69 I purchased last summer to a very reputable local shop for paint and bodywork. The owners son has a 2002 that they just completed and it looks amazing, so I’m not worried about that aspect. I guess I just want to make I know what I want to keep it as “original” as possible. Engine is out and already rebuilt, front and rear subframes are out, just need to remove interior and trim. 
 

My question is for those of you that have had a full body repaint what do I need to discuss with them about areas of concern or details to get back as close as possible to how it looked originally. It a very dry car, minimal obvious rust, just sun scorched and dents and dings everywhere. I’m looking for a list here, so please feel free to add any advice you have and I will post a complete list to summarize later in the comments.

 

Also, a question about paint. Most repaints I have seen it looks like it’s almost too thick. Does the choice between single stage or not affect this or what is everyone doing now, brands, etc. I am keeping it the original Granada color. Thanks in advance. 
 

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paint, unless your painter is inexperienced, base coat clear coat is no thicker than a single stage urethane...unless he gets heavy handed

 

single stage urethane is just color and clear already mixed together...base/clear is just enough color for full coverage followed by coats of clear

 

6 of 1

 

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While preparing my 1970 BMW 1600 for paint, I went round and round trying to find a period color that I liked.  I ended up going with the original color "Nevada", but finding that paint color was difficult.  I can't tell you how many spray outs I did with multiple manufacturers to get the right "Nevada" with slight olive undertones.  Finally found the right color in Glasurit, but Nevada was only offered in their top line.

 

You may have the same issues with Granada.  Only offered from 1964 - 1968 using BMW Paint Code (337), (337 is now Dakar Yellow), it was re-introduced in 1973 for one year under Paint Code "023".  It may be available in Glasurit in one of their economy lines.

 

Bottomline, just because the paint code is correct and it says Granada on the can, doesn't guarantee it will look like it did when it rolled off the factory floor, i.e. Malaga.

 

IMHO,

 

Mark92131

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Hey John!

 

Besides what’s been mentioned already:

 

1. Upper front fender seams are brazed and soldered, lower seams just use seam sealer which is painted over.

 

2. upper rear fender seams between the forward corners of the trunk and the corners of the rear window are not completely filled.

 

3. Hood supports behind grill are brush painted semi-gloss/matte black as is the area around the radiator and behind the headlights.

 

4. VIN stamping on right fender not painted over. It should be taped over a bit crudely before the body is painted. After removal it will be exposed gray primer.

 

5. Door latches and lock assemblies are removed prior to painting. They are not painted over.

 

6. I would suggest using a product like 3M strip caulk between the base of the trunk hinges and where they mount to the body as the holes in the body are a little large to allow for adjustment and consequently are not watertight once the trunk lid is installed and properly adjusted. Water is notorious for making its way into the trunk one way or the other and ultimately settling in the spare tire well and also the area around the gas tank.

 

7. Speaking of the gas tank, do not use the OEM material that BMW still sells to seal the tank to the trunk. It is open cell foam which is extremely water absorbent and will consequently create rust in short order.  Use something like the above mentioned 3M product or anything closed cell like weatherstrip and caulking cord.

 

I know there’s more which others will add, but I think this should help a bit.

 

This is always an exciting moment! Keep us posted!

 

Wendel

 

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To me the one spot on the car where I can spot all but the best repaints is where the rear roof pillar meets the body, it takes a lot of careful sanding to match the original body line. There are also several shadow lines that can be sanded to the point where they just go away. I'm sure your at the right shop but it takes time to get it right. I would ask to see the body after the primer coat goes on and close your eyes and see with a light touch with your finger tips.

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1 hour ago, 1936spyder said:

3. Hood supports behind grill are brush painted semi-gloss/matte black as is the area around the radiator and behind the headlights.

On my Feb 69 production Nevada '02 (bought new) the only thing painted black behind the grilles were the two hood supports, not the radiator surrounds or behind the headlights.  They were body color.

 

1 hour ago, 1936spyder said:

I would suggest using a product like 3M strip caulk between the base of the trunk hinges and where they mount to the body as the holes in the body are a little large to allow for adjustment and consequently are not watertight once the trunk lid is installed and properly adjusted. Water is notorious for making its way into the trunk one way or the other and ultimately settling in the spare tire well and also the area around the gas tank.

Use the same stuff around the rear bumper bracket bolts/washer (BMW used some sort of white mastic that's still pliable after 53 years!)

 

Is your '69 a "first series" (VIN below 1664860, built prior to 1 Jan 69) or a "second series" car?  If you have specific questions about schutz lines/areas, PM me or just post.  I've owned mine since new and when I repainted in 1999 I was very careful to follow the original part lines to keep it correct.  Oh, and the rockers are body color on roundies...

 

mike

 

1 hour ago, 1936spyder said:

Speaking of the gas tank, do not use the OEM material that BMW still sells to seal the tank to the trunk.

Closed cell foam (hardware store weatherstripping that's closed cell) works best.  Caulk or mastic will make the tank the very devil to remove next time you have to.  And there will be a next time!

 

 

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Regarding your question about paint appearing too thick, I would imagine that those repaints were not bare metal jobs.

 

In terms of exact color matching, if it’s a complete repaint I suppose that’s not much of a concern. My repaint was done in 2-stage Dupont and the color is definitely a tad richer than the original single stage Glasurit. It’s only apparent when you lift the hood and look at the engine bay as that’s the only part of my car that wasn’t done (although I will be taking care of that next year).

 

Steve Kupper’s just sold survivor ‘75 on the left next to my restored ‘74 tii:

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54 minutes ago, Mike Self said:

On my Feb 69 production Nevada '02 (bought new)


Mine is a July 69 production date, so a second series.

 

Mike, the shop is maybe less than an hour away from you, I may just swing by and drag you over there with me sometime. ?

 

I will message you about the Schutz lines to just to make sure I get it correct.

Edited by JohnP_02
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Great stuff so far, and exactly the kind of details I was looking for. I would have never thought about the body lines on the roof, or all the schutz lines etc., I am so preoccupied with other details. I am going to drive the shit out of this car, so it doesn't have to be flawless, just would like to get the details as close to factory as possible.

 

So any insight on paint options for Granada? Is it basically Glasurit or PPG then everything else? 

 

*edit, I just asked the shop and they use Exalts brand paint.

 

Thanks! 

 

 

Edited by JohnP_02
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To add to everything else, the details changed in production both by month and

year, and apparently by who was doing what.  The things were certainly made

on a line,  but they were also made by a company and a workforce that was 

relatively new to the 'they're all the same' mentality.

To that end, there was a lot of variation in small details- and the bodywork

wasn't all that fantastic- for example, the blend of the upper C- pillar into the

roof's usually detectable (by feel) on an original- paint car.  Me, I make it look nice.  F that 'original mistake' thing!

 

If you're going to use the car, I'd err on the side of putting more protection on the nose

(up to the bumper, for sure) and make sure the rockers are done in their entirety.

Also, there are non- original creature comforts that make the car a LOT nicer to 

live with- modern A/C being one, delay wipers being another- that are worth doing now.

Nope, it's not original, but so whut?  Cars are meant to be used.   Otherwise, they'd come pre- framed.

 

Likewise, give the shop the rear trim rings for the taillights- those often didn't fit perfectly from new, and

getting hit never helped much.  Then the shop can fit to them, and make them look right.  They'll

be doing work there anyhow.  Front turns, too.  Grilles.  Clean them up, label them OBVIOUSLY

(like, write your name on the back side with a sharpie on the metal) and give them to your 'front counter'

person along with a list.  Get them to initial one copy, and leave the other with them.  And go through

the parts with them.  Then leave them in a big plastic Home Depot box with your name on the 

outside in the back seat area of the car.  Tape a copy to the flap, if you're feeling frisky.

That way the people who work on it will have them, and you'll have some chance of getting

them back, or getting the shop to replace them without any hard feelings.  Things happen.

 

there's certainly tons more...

t

 

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