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Odometer reset to "0" ...or not?


Toga
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Hi everyone! Still working on my 2002tii restoration. I've heard that after a full restoration like the one I did (engine,gearbox, rear drivegear rebuild + total body restoration), it is "common sense" to reset the odometer to O km....
I like the idea.
Did anyone do that job? Is there a DIY about it?
Thanks for you help

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Many original unrestored 2002 odometers are broken.  For those cars, your question is moot since the mileage is unknown.  I have a big box full of salvage yard instrument clusters, ALL of which have dead odometers- there's a little plastic gear that just spins on a metal shaft instead of turning the shaft IIRC.  An odometer from this era can be set to whatever mileage you want, as was sometimes done by used car dealers way back when- thus laws against the practice and the various tamper proof methods used after our cars were built.  

 

I don't know what the restoration community considers correct, but I think it's all about truth.  Resetting the odometer to 0 while making the previous "actual" mileage (working odometer or not) part of the car's permanent record wouldn't bother me if I were buying a restored car. 

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3 hours ago, visionaut said:

No. You don’t reset the odo…


+1

 

Tastes and preferences obviously vary!

 

Let me start by saying I don’t trust any ‘02 odometer without lots of documentation. The ‘02, and many cars, have a long history of speedometer, odometer, and speedometer cable failure. And, of course, the five-digit odometer was tailored for cars that were built to last 10 years and be fully consumed by 100,000 miles, as I believe the ‘02 was. Thus, a five-digit odometer on a 20-or-more-year-old car is bound to tell lies. “TMU” or True Mileage Unknown probably describes a large majority of 50-year-old cars.

 

Nonetheless, to me, there is something “slimy and slippery” about altering odometers. Perhaps it’s because I grew up in the era of rampant odometer cheating. Honest people didn’t screw around with odometers; that work was left to third-tier used car sellers. Perhaps it’s because I prefer a partial or flawed history to an erased history. Ten years and two owners from now, that reset to zero will be forgotten and the car will be listed on eBay with “47,000 original miles”… No thanks!

 

Regards,

 

Steve

 

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If you know that the mileage (or kilometerage--is that a word?) on your car was correct at the time you began the restoration, I would leave it along, and simply record in your repairs/mileage booklet (you do keep one, don't you?) the odometer reading at the time the car's restoration was completed.  However, if you don't know that the odometer reading is correct (how many times has ti rolled over, was it broken when you bought it, etc), then it's your choice:  zero it, or simply note the reading at restoration completion, and note that the previous reading may or may not have been correct.  

 

When the gear on my '73's odometer worked loose and it stopped recording, I kept track of where I drove during the week it wasn't functioning, and when I repaired the odometer, I connected it to my cordless drill and ran those missing 30 or so miles back onto the odometer so it would be absolutely correct.  But that's me...

 

mike

 

 

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17 minutes ago, Mike Self said:

 

… When the gear on my '73's odometer worked loose and it stopped recording, I kept track of where I drove during the week it wasn't functioning, and when I repaired the odometer, I connected it to my cordless drill and ran those missing 30 or so miles back onto the odometer so it would be absolutely correct.  But that's me...

 


 

Geez, Mike, now I’m feeling like a third-rate used car seller from the ‘60’s! When the speedometer cable on the ‘76 broke, 40-some years ago, it was probably a week until I received and installed a new cable. And I did not correct the odometer! Of course, the ‘76’s factory-screw-up speedometer/odometer overstated my speed by 9% for 100,000 miles (indicated), so maybe my cheatin’ on the broken cable was more than offset by BMW’s speedometer screw up on the odometer gearing! 👍

 

Best regards,

 

Steve

 

 

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7 hours ago, Toga said:

I've heard that after a full restoration like the one I did (engine,gearbox, rear drivegear rebuild + total body restoration), it is "common sense" to reset the odometer to O km....

That appears to be a common practice in Europe.  Vintage American muscle cars are imported, totally refurbished and listed with 0 miles, at least in Germany that was the case. But as imports with no "brief" they probably receive a brand new one (brief)

Not sure what hoops you must jump through with TUV (German DMV) to make that happen but its probably many.

In Germany, cars all have a "brief" issued, this document remains with the car  its entire life. Specs, all owners, mileage, history, its all there. Perhaps Belgium is similar?

 

Cars are not tracked like that in the states, no brief, mileage is not tracked and altering odometers is pretty much frowned upon and considered a shady, sharp business practice. 😉

 

But you are in Belgium, it may be an accepted practice there, so check it out with Belgian TUV equivalent.

No idea how to actually reset an odometer to zero but on and 02 its probably not too difficult.

Edited by tech71
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Most of these cars have only the body that went the total miles.  The rest of the mechanicals and suspension parts have been replaced at various times, I see no importance in the odometer reporting the true mileage unless the car is being sold as a low mileage (less than 100k).

Change the diff ratio and the speedo needs changing anyway for the correct ratio.  When I changed from a 3.64 to a 3.90, I bought a new speedometer and started over at 000.  The original speedo has 83K in the box.

Edited by jimk
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If I bought a complete car and fixed something, I would not change the odometer.

 

When I stripped a shell to bare metal and made a car out of 3 total cars and

various other mechanical parts found at garage sales, I picked

the speedo I liked best, fixed the broken gear, and started out at 0.  

 

That was possibly illegal.  But the statute has run out on it, I'm sure.

 

t

 

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Thank you all for your opinions.  Tech 71 you pointed to a specific topic I didn't think about! The legal side of it! And that's right that in Belgium we have what's called "carpass". This a record of the different "kilometrage" noted by the different places where you went for a service : new tires, engine maintenance etc. Each time you enter a garage, the first thing they do is taking note of the km. And when you sell the car, the carpass follows the car. All this to avoid the cheaters paradise that existed in the past. I'll check that particular point with our Belgian "controle technique" and see what is possible. They will may be note on the pass that the car was fully restored...The aim is not to make believe anyone that this is a new car, but to have an easy reference to her full restoration. I have no history documentation at all about the car and the capass gives only 3 dates in 2009 and nothing before or since then! So not really reliable either. I contacted BMW Germany and I have the exportation date to Paris. But BMW France is not answering to my different e-mails.
At least now for a new "0", I have a full detailed documentation, bills and pictures on what has been done... ...

Important to add that I'm not a professional, and anyway will probably keep the car or transmit it in the close family.
 

Edited by Toga
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