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Determining clutch and flywheel help


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So I finally got around to pulling the 4 speed on my Frankenstein 68 1600. Will be swapping to a 245 5 speed. It had a manual clutch but the block is from a 73… It appears to my novice eye that the pressure plate belongs to a manual clutch car but they could not run the 1600 flywheel because it would be a 6 bolt flywheel. Anyway I digress… What flywheel do I have here??? I figure I will need a new clutch kit as I have no clue the mileage and I’m putting the 245 in. Thanks in advance everyone. I included the vin lookup for the block but the car itself is a 68 1600. FYI. 
 

Rocco

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When I put a 245 on my 6 bolt ‘68 car, I used a 6 bolt flywheel like yours with the later 228mm clutch bolt pattern machined onto it. 

I would recommend this route for superior operation and replacement part availability. 

 

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9 minutes ago, Lorin said:

When I put a 245 on my 6 bolt ‘68 car, I used a 6 bolt flywheel like yours with the later 228mm clutch bolt pattern machined onto it. 

I would recommend this route for superior operation and replacement part availability. 

 


So buy a 228 clutch disc and pressure plate just like I was hoping too, take the flywheel off and take it to a machine shop and have them drill and thread new bolt holes in the flywheel that match the new pressure plate? Thanks you by the way. 

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So I’m still confused as to what I have here… let’s assume that the original 1600 motor was dead… Someone had a 73 block lying around and used it in lue of rebuilding the 1600… but they took the time to swap the 1600 crank into the block of the 73 2.0L??? Or they found an early 2.0L crank with 6 bolts and swapped that into the 2.0L 73 block so that they could use the 200mm 1600 clutch?? That doesn’t add up…

 

would there be a benefit to fitting the 73 block with the 1600 crank? They would have had to have used 2.0L pistons and rods…???!!!… I’m confused… lol

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OMG a 48 year old engine block that doesn't have it's original crankshaft!!! I'm shocked!!

The easiest fix is to have the flywheel machined and fitted with either the 228mm or 215mm clutch disc and pressure plate.  As you can guess it is critically important to get it centered and get the proper step machined into the flywheel no matter what one you choose.  

 

Someone could have built a short stroke 1800cc engine using the 1600 stroke crank and the 2L bore and kept the 2L head as well. I'm guessing the last person to have that engine apart used what ever pieces were under the workbench and didn't spend any more $$$ than absolutely necessary.    Until you take it apart and measure it you will never know.   

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Well it’s more money than I want to spend but the JBR 6 bolt aluminum flywheel would work I guess. It’s set up already for a 228 clutch kit. Anyone want to take a stab at what I’m going to spend having this old flywheel machined and surfaced? Trying to weigh my options here…

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I'd first try to figure the displacement of the engine before buying anything.
Otherwise you'll find yourself with an 1800cc with a 2 liter head

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5 minutes ago, uai said:

I'd first try to figure the displacement of the engine before buying anything.
Otherwise you'll find yourself with an 1800cc with a 2 liter head


mother than tearing everything apart, how would I go about figuring out displacement? It’s a 73 block and a 6 bolt crank. Wouldn’t you have to have a 320i block to end up with 1800cc? Don’t kill me… I can turn a wrench but I’m not an educated mechanic…

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The 1600cc engines were a 84mm bore and a 71mm stroke

The early 1800cc engines were 84mm bore and 80mm stroke

Then BMW started making the 2 liter with a 89mm bore and the 80mm stroke,  they had to change the block castings to accept the larger bore.

They then used the same block with the 89mm bore and used the shorter 71mm stroke to make the later version of the 1800cc engine.  

 

They made 6 bolt crankshafts in both the 71mm and 80mm strokes.  Have you checked to make sure you have a 1973 2 liter block?  It is possible it is the small bore 1600 block (however by 1973 even the 1600/1800 cranks were 8 bolt) 

 

It is also possible this was Gene Wilder's car at some point. ( Tongue-in-cheek  Young Frankenstein reverence)  

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