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Totally random here.. but! I could use a brainstorm of ideas if anyone wants to spare some while having a laugh at this absurd dilemma..

 

I bought my second ‘76 2002 about a month and a half ago. There was a bit more rot hiding than I was able to tell at first sight but nothing a little (more) work (than I’d like to do) can’t fix. 
What I did find, however.. was someone had the brilliant idea of filling the space between the fenders and foot wells with Great Stuff, as well as well as the frame rails via the holes in the floor pans, and the space in the body behind the rear “door” cards or whatever you’d call em back there. Not for the life of me can I figure out why someone would do this, but it is virtually a sponge as this point and just brings water right into the car.. crazy. 
 

Anyway, it’s gotta go. Frame rails are a sort of easy fix-ish.. but any ideas on how the hell I can get this Stuff out?😅

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Yes, but it would float like a pool noodle.

Nuthin to it. - way easier than the TR-4 that I mighta coulda (but didn't, wheew) bought many years ago.  All low hanging sheetmetal with cavities were partly rusted out and had portland cement mortar

Great Stuff is a closed cell foam, and it’s insoluble in water. You must have pockets of trapped water within it…   Be very careful removing it. Dried it’s flammable at 240F ( cels contain o

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Aughhhhh! What a mess.

There must be some kind of solvent that will melt the "Not-So-Great Stuff" back into a liquid form that could then harden and act as a sealer....without being a sponge.

Just a thought..... That stuff is nasty!

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2 minutes ago, John76 said:

Aughhhhh! What a mess.

There must be some kind of solvent that will melt the "Not-So-Great Stuff" back into a liquid form that could then harden and act as a sealer....without being a sponge.

Just a thought..... That stuff is nasty!


literally the worst! And it’s impossible to even cut through for the most part. Why anybody would put it in any part of a vehicle is mind blowing to me lol. 

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Man that sucks.  Hate to say it, but its a popular thing amongst "new" old car owners.  I've seen it a ton over the years.  So, it may or may not make you feel better to know you aren't alone.  The place I see it the most is with cars on frames where someone has filled the entire frame with it.  

 

Having removed it several times myself, I think you'll find you're gonna be stuck with "mechanical" strategies like wire wheels, box cutter/knife, or even a spoon.  I'm not aware of anything that will easily dissolve cured spray foam.  At least anything that you'd feel safe using.  

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The foams used by the manufacturers in frame supports etc. are closed cell foam that doesn't absorb water, they can add a lot to the strength of a chassis or roof. I agree Tdh post you'll have to dig it out, sharpened spoons of various sizes help.   

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40 minutes ago, Tdh said:

Man that sucks.  Hate to say it, but its a popular thing amongst "new" old car owners.  I've seen it a ton over the years.  So, it may or may not make you feel better to know you aren't alone.  The place I see it the most is with cars on frames where someone has filled the entire frame with it.  

 

Having removed it several times myself, I think you'll find you're gonna be stuck with "mechanical" strategies like wire wheels, box cutter/knife, or even a spoon.  I'm not aware of anything that will easily dissolve cured spray foam.  At least anything that you'd feel safe using.  


I will say I thought maybe I’d found the only idiot out there to do this to a car lol so I am glad to hear this isn’t a total first for people! I’m thinking this is going to be a slow and gruelling process unfortunately!

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1 minute ago, Son of Marty said:

The foams used by the manufacturers in frame supports etc. are closed cell foam that doesn't absorb water, they can add a lot to the strength of a chassis or roof. I agree Tdh post you'll have to dig it out, sharpened spoons of various sizes help.   

Actually yeah, a sharpened spoon is a solid idea. Good call!

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Nuthin to it. - way easier than the TR-4 that I mighta coulda (but didn't, wheew) bought many years ago.  All low hanging sheetmetal with cavities were partly rusted out and had portland cement mortar fillings.  they had smoothed the raw edges of the rust-thru spots, spanned the gap with some sort of tape, and poured in the cement from above.  Gentle sheet metal curves turned into flat surfaces with tape joint lines visible.  After painting, you could hardly see it, at least with your eyes closed.  Lower center of gravity for sure...  I always wondered if there was rebar inside.

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33 minutes ago, calw said:

Nuthin to it. - way easier than the TR-4 that I mighta coulda (but didn't, wheew) bought many years ago.  All low hanging sheetmetal with cavities were partly rusted out and had portland cement mortar fillings.  they had smoothed the raw edges of the rust-thru spots, spanned the gap with some sort of tape, and poured in the cement from above.  Gentle sheet metal curves turned into flat surfaces with tape joint lines visible.  After painting, you could hardly see it, at least with your eyes closed.  Lower center of gravity for sure...  I always wondered if there was rebar inside.

This is a first for me. Using cement as body filler!

 

Thats amazing...

 

JasonP

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11 minutes ago, esty said:

try spraying with acetone
 

 

I was thinking that, just not sure how well I can get it in there as there’s like virtually no access it seems other than the oval vent holes..

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Great Stuff is a closed cell foam, and it’s insoluble in water. You must have pockets of trapped water within it…

 

Be very careful removing it. Dried it’s flammable at 240F ( cels contain original propellant.  And don’t sand it, it’s particulates are toxic.

 

The Safety data sheet:

GREAT-STUFF™-Insulating-Foam-Sealant-The-Dow-Chemical-Company.pdf

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26 minutes ago, JsnPpp said:

This is a first for me. Using cement as body filler!

 

Imagine driving down the road when some rocker filler drops out you run over it and flatten your rear tire..........HERES YOUR SIGN...... 

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Yes, dig it out.

Mixing with a solvent that is capable of dissolving it will create a gooey, flammable, toxic mess that will end up everywhere.

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