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Tar sound deadening removal “trick”


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I removed the majority of the tar sound seasoning sheets on my 1600... little trick that might help someone. My posts always end up too long so I did a stupid video... Hint,

BFH FTW!!! Videos are about 1 min each. 

 

https://youtube.com/shorts/yquZ93XI5kM?feature=share

 

https://youtube.com/shorts/2qHaozKmbcw?feature=share

https://youtube.com/shorts/RiDrcp9ZXsg?feature=share

 

Edited by RoccoGilroy
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  • RoccoGilroy changed the title to Tar sound deadening removal “trick”

I'm not sure the hammering did much, I think you just got lucky that the old tar was already loose.

 

Your floor was looking pretty nice until you showed the "little rust" lol. Looks like your car had a bad windshield leak at some point or a previous owner had really sweaty feet lol.

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2 minutes ago, 2002iii said:

I'm not sure the hammering did much, I think you just got lucky that the old tar was already loose.

 

Your floor was looking pretty nice until you showed the "little rust" lol. Looks like your car had a bad windshield leak at some point or a previous owner had really sweaty feet lol.


lol I know right... I’m just going to wire wheel it out real good and maybe try to put a patch in... then POR-15 everywhere... It’ll never be a show car. It’s already modded a bunch and the 1.6 motor is long gone... it’s got a short neck diff so

someone already swapped the rear subframe. It is what it is. As long as it runs and drives it’s all good... it’s already making memories for the family and that’s why I bought it...

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Looks like you got those tar mats out of there just in time!  Nice work.

 

I'll bet the hammer helped loosen it up.  It might reshape the pan a bit in the process though.  I'd be sure to spin the four plugs out of the floor, so you can clean them up along with the opening.  I painted mine separately and then spun them back in with some body caulking in the joint.

 

It is not too hard to hammer out patches for places like that rusty corner.  Using a propane torch to heat where you shape it makes it move really easily. 

088.JPG

089.JPG

 

I patched my floor with two pieces and put the joint on top of the frame rail.  This was the first piece.

 

095.JPG

 

POR15 is tough paint, but be sure to use their prep products.  Especially the one that etches the metal.


Tom

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8 minutes ago, '76mintgrün'02 said:

Looks like you got those tar mats out of there just in time!  Nice work.

 

I'll bet the hammer helped loosen it up.  It might reshape the pan a bit in the process though.  I'd be sure to spin the four plugs out of the floor, so you can clean them up along with the opening.  I painted mine separately and then spun them back in with some body caulking in the joint.

 

It is not too hard to hammer out patches for places like that rusty corner.  Using a propane torch to heat where you shape it makes it move really easily. 

088.JPG

089.JPG

 

I patched my floor with two pieces and put the joint on top of the frame rail.  This was the first piece.

 

095.JPG

 

POR15 is tough paint, but be sure to use their prep products.  Especially the one that etches the metal.


Tom

I like your DIY fix, the welding looks good. What gauge steel did you use?

 

The only thing I see that might be a problem with your torch and hammer method is when you heat the steel it makes it easier to bend because it's making the metal weaker. Also beating it with a hammer stretches the metal making it thinner too. I would be worried about the parts you hammered being weak and/or rusting. Maybe try heat treating the patch panel after you finish hammering on it.

 

I would definitely recommend cleaning up all the surface rust and any other debris. Then use a good self etching primer and then a couple coats of POR15 on both sides.

 

For @RoccoGilroy I think you need to do some more investigation into that rusty front floor pan and front a pillar with a wire wheel on a grinder or drill. You may find the hole gets bigger and might require a more serious work and/or patch panels. Remember these are unibody cars so that's part of your chassis.

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33 minutes ago, '76mintgrün'02 said:

Looks like you got those tar mats out of there just in time!  Nice work.

 

I'll bet the hammer helped loosen it up.  It might reshape the pan a bit in the process though.  I'd be sure to spin the four plugs out of the floor, so you can clean them up along with the opening.  I painted mine separately and then spun them back in with some body caulking in the joint.

 

It is not too hard to hammer out patches for places like that rusty corner.  Using a propane torch to heat where you shape it makes it move really easily. 

088.JPG

089.JPG

 

I patched my floor with two pieces and put the joint on top of the frame rail.  This was the first piece.

 

095.JPG

 

POR15 is tough paint, but be sure to use their prep products.  Especially the one that etches the metal.


Tom


That’s nice clean work my friend. I actually used POR15 and the associated prep products on the engine bar of my old car. Worked great! I followed the directions to a T... when you put that much energy and time into prepping you don’t wanna skimp... 

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3 minutes ago, 2002iii said:

I like your DIY fix, the welding looks good. What gauge steel did you use?

 

The only thing I see that might be a problem with your torch and hammer method is when you heat the steel it makes it easier to bend because it's making the metal weaker. Also beating it with a hammer stretches the metal making it thinner too. I would be worried about the parts you hammered being weak and/or rusting. Maybe try heat treating the patch panel after you finish hammering on it.

 

I would definitely recommend cleaning up all the surface rust and any other debris. Then use a good self etching primer and then a couple coats of POR15 on both sides.

 

I did mine almost ten years ago.  I just dug up the old photos for this thread, since he might be shaping some patches. 

 

I don't recall what gauge the patches were, but the steel was quite a bit thicker than the floor panels.  Steel gets softer when heated, but I don't understand what you mean about making it weaker as a result of having heated it up.  Stretching would have had a minimal effect on thickness in this case. 

 

It is just mild steel, so I'm not sure what you mean by heat treating it after hammering on it.  I treated it to some heat before hammering on it.  :) 

 

POR 15 is not made to go over epoxy primer.  I recommend following their instructions and using their prep products.

 

Tom

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Yes metal either thickens or thins when you bend it but it's the same using a hammer or a 100 ton press it still repositions the steel to meet the bends, as for heat treating our era BMW's and most European cars are built out of mild steel so no heat treatment was used on the steel, to harden steel it's more how the metal is quenched than the heat if it's air cooled it shouldn't get harder. 

 

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3 hours ago, joysterm said:

Good to know but I would have tried dry ice first. Less fuss

no hammering


only place I know to get dry ice is a party store... Not a big fan of clowns... lol J/K... I just went at it because the floor pans were wrinkled already. Maybe someone tried to jack it up from the floor instead of the frame? Who knows.... either way I got most of it out. The purpose was to see how bad the rust was... Overall it’s not that bad from what I can tell... The drivers side front is the problem area but after some wire wheeling the pan looks decent enough. Only place it went through was the hole I showed, left of the pedal box. I’m thinking patch it in and por15 everything... can’t do much else with it. $$$$$$$$$

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2 hours ago, '76mintgrün'02 said:

 

I did mine almost ten years ago.  I just dug up the old photos for this thread, since he might be shaping some patches. 

 

I don't recall what gauge the patches were, but the steel was quite a bit thicker than the floor panels.  Steel gets softer when heated, but I don't understand what you mean about making it weaker as a result of having heated it up.  Stretching would have had a minimal effect on thickness in this case. 

 

It is just mild steel, so I'm not sure what you mean by heat treating it after hammering on it.  I treated it to some heat before hammering on it.  :) 

 

POR 15 is not made to go over epoxy primer.  I recommend following their instructions and using their prep products.

 

Tom

The fact that the steel was thicker than the original to begin with means what I said doesn't really matter.

 

When you heated the steel and formed it and then let it cool slowly you made it softer and weaker.

 

So to put the strength back and make the steel less brittle you could heat treat or temper the metal.

 

I've never used POR15 so I didn't know.

 

2 hours ago, Son of Marty said:

Yes metal either thickens or thins when you bend it but it's the same using a hammer or a 100 ton press it still repositions the steel to meet the bends, as for heat treating our era BMW's and most European cars are built out of mild steel so no heat treatment was used on the steel, to harden steel it's more how the metal is quenched than the heat if it's air cooled it shouldn't get harder. 

 

 

From the factory the panels where cold drop pressed, that's very different then heating with a torch and repeatedly hammering/stretching.

 

Sorry for the confusion, I was trying to keep it simple but failed. If its air cooled then its getting softer and should be heated and normalized or quenched to restore the strength. 

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19 minutes ago, 2002iii said:

When you heated the steel and formed it and then let it cool slowly you made it softer and weaker.

 

So to put the strength back and make the steel less brittle you could heat treat or temper the metal.

 

What you're saying would be true, if the body/patch panels were high-carbon steel; but mild steel doesn't behave the same way due to the low carbon content.  It is soft on purpose and tends to stay that way, despite heating/cooling/quenching/etc..

 

That's my understanding anyway.  Thank you for looking out for me.

 

Tom

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All this is too technical for me... his patch looks great to me and I’ll bet my car it’ll last a heck of a lot longer than whatever rusty medal used to be there... I respect the science of metal but give credit where credit is due! Dude made a patch and formed it himself with hammer and heat! Welded said metal into his car... and is driving said car with no rust, where rust once existed... 76mintgrün02  if you’d like to patch my car up, your welcome to come over any time! 
 

2002tii, I respect your science knowledge... and for a restoration, you have valid points and I understand that there are “better” ways to go about this job... thank you for your input.

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