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Difference between 68 & 70 1602?


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I have a stock 1970 1602 that I’m starting to refurbish. It was a beater & running poorly when I parked it 30 years ago. So now it’s a beater that doesn’t run. I see an engine & transmission for sale locally from a 1968 1602. Do all 68 & 70 have the same engine/transmissions? Are these parts difficult to come by? Should I let it go & see what I need when I get into my repairs or should I buy it knowing I’ll need the parts at some point? 

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There are differences: the 70 uses an 8 bolt crank and flywheel while the 68 uses a 6 bolt crank and flywheel. Otherwise, the flywheel dimensions are the same. The pressure plate and clutch disk are identical. If you plan on using the same 200mm clutch disk and pressure plate, the 68 motor is fine. It only makes a difference if you plan on using the larger 8 bolt flywheel from a later 2002 along with the corresponding 215mm clutch disk and pressure plate. I wouldn’t recommend it, but some people do this because the 215mm clutch components such as the disk and pressure plate are much easier and cheaper to obtain vs. the 200mm stuff which is really getting expensive, especially the pressure plate. But, the 200mm pressure plate can be rebuilt while the 215mm is a throw away item. Both, the 200mm and 215mm clutch use the same throw out bearing, so if you ever plan on doing a conversion to the 5 speed overdrive, either of the clutch systems will work, but most people go the 215mm route for the 5 speed conversion because that is what was used with the 5 speed overdrive from the 320i.  As far as the transmission is concerned the earlier 68 trans will mate up to your block, but I don’t think it will work with your driveshaft. I believe by 1970 all 02s were equipped with the same driveshaft with the large 8 bolt Guibo and corresponding 4 bolt yoke on the transmission. This wasn’t the case back in 68 where the 1600s used the smaller 6 bolt Guibo coupled to the 3 bolt yoke on the transmission. The yokes are interchangeable, but the real problem is the length of the shift fork from the trans. The shift fork mates to the linkage just above the smaller guibo on the 68 trans while on the 70 trans it mates to the linkage aft of the larger guibo, otherwise the mating junction wouldn’t clear the larger guibo. The 70 trans can be adopted to fit the 68 driveshaft, but the 68 trans can not be adopted to fit the 70 driveshaft.

Edited by Slavs
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Wow, good info. This is what I was hoping to find out. Right now the goal for this project is to get it drivable & have parts to replace as needed. If the 68 transmission/clutch won’t be an equal swap, no reason to buy & stock parts that I don’t necessarily need. Thanks for the detailed response.

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The 68 trans won't work, but the clutch disk, pressure plate and throw out bearing are all identical. So, the clutch is the same. The flywheel dimensions are the same, but they are not interchangeable as one is a 6 bolt and the other an 8 bolt.

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If 1600 crankshafts follow the same setups between 6 and 8 bolt flywheels (other than the size, of course) the 6 bolt crankshafts use a different pressure plate and throwout bearing than the 8 bolt cranks.  On my early '69 (400 cars from the changeover to the 8 bolt crank) the pressure plate is a coil spring unit, vs the diaphragm pressure plate that is used with the 8 bolt crank.  This also means that the throwout bearing is also different.  

 

The factory changed over 2002s in March '69 at VIN 1665200; AFAIK the 1600s changed at the same time.  

 

Were that my '68 1600 I'd try to use the original, numbers matching engine if it's at all salvageable.  Not a lot of 68 1600s left, and an original one would be better than one with a replacement engine.  Failing that, at least keep the original engine with an eye to rebuilding it someday, or at least passing it along with the car when (someday) you pass it on to another caretaker

 

mike

 

 

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Yes, my 70 1600 has a matching engine & I intend to get it operable again, keeping it as close to stock as reasonable. At some point prior to my ownership, someone took a grinder to the transmission to allow more travel for the clutch fork. Not sure what that was about, but I when I saw the engine & trans for sale I thought a spare trans might be handy. But I’m not looking to complicate matters with parts that don’t match up easily. Thanks for the responses.

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2 hours ago, Mike Self said:

If 1600 crankshafts follow the same setups between 6 and 8 bolt flywheels (other than the size, of course) the 6 bolt crankshafts use a different pressure plate and throwout bearing than the 8 bolt cranks.  On my early '69 (400 cars from the changeover to the 8 bolt crank) the pressure plate is a coil spring unit, vs the diaphragm pressure plate that is used with the 8 bolt crank.  This also means that the throwout bearing is also different.  

Mike,

No, the 1600s don't follow the same setups between 6 and 8 bolt flywheels as the 2002. When they switched over from 6 bolt to 8 bolt crankshafts on the 2002, they also switched to a completely different pressure plate and throw out bearing, switching from coil spring to diaphragm. But, when they switched over from 6 bolt to 8 bolt cranks on the 1600, they kept the same three prong coil spring pressure plate with corresponding throw out bearing, which happens to be the identical throw out bearing also used on the later 215mm clutch of the 2002. I would also like to add that the early coil spring pressure plate of the early 2002 differs greatly from the coil spring pressure plate of the 1600.

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