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I have a stock speck early 2L motor with single barrel Solex in my 67 1600-2. The car also has a 245/5 trans and a limited slip long neck 4.11 diff.

When I attempted using an early cast distributor for a 2 liter (numbers ending in 045), the car just stumbled and fell flat on its face. I thought something maybe wrong with the distributor, so I pulled out another identical distributor from my parts stash, but the car did the same thing.

 

Then I pulled out an early 1600-2 distributor, also cast but numbers ending in 048. The car runs perfect with it. The 1600 distributor has a different curve, and it seems that my car shouldn't be running as nice with it. But, why are my distributors for the 2L not working ? What are the chances that both of my 2L distributors are defective ? Does my car still think it's a 1600? I though it may be crying back for a 1.6L motor. So, I started building a spare 1.6L with NOS parts, just to have as a spare.

Edited by Slavs
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I would think the first step is to have the 2 failed distributors spun to check function and curve specs, they could easily be worn out or have a sticky advance. Remember these were set to spec for gasoline that was very different from todays gas.

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2 hours ago, Slavs said:

why are my distributors for the 2L not working ? What are the chances that both of my 2L distributors are defective ?

 

Based on your story, I'd say chances are around 96%.

 

I wish you lived closer, so you could bring them by for a spin on the distributor tester.

 

Did you connect the vacuum pod to ported or manifold vacuum?

 

Tom

 

 

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1 hour ago, '76mintgrün'02 said:

 

Did you connect the vacuum pod to ported or manifold vacuum?

Yes, I connected the vacuum. I'll take a closer look at them. I've never had distributors tested or rebuilt. I have a box full of them. including mechanical advance variants. If anybody knows of somebody who does this type of work in the vicinity of Los Angeles, I'd greatly appreciate it.

 

Slavs

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Does the single barrel Solex have a ported-vacuum nipple?

 

I prefer to use ported vacuum, since it doesn't bring in any advance at idle, but it does come in during light acceleration/cruising.

 

If you connected the pod to manifold vacuum, it will pull in all 12 degrees or so at idle. 

 

 

 

Did you disconnect the vacuum pod while setting timing?  That's an important step.

 

 

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Yes, the single barrel Solex has a vacuum nipple. It’s on the body of the carb. I always check the vacuum advance diaghpram pot on the distributor by removing the small vacuum hose and sucking on it while observing the advance lever for movement in the distributor. I never set the timing dynamically with a timing light. I always set the timing using the static method. It’s always worked for me. 

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14 minutes ago, Slavs said:

I never set the timing dynamically with a timing light. I always set the timing using the static method. It’s always worked for me. 

 

I'd be interested in hearing more about your method.

 

If you're interested in learning more about how your distributors are behaving, the Innova 5568 timing light has the variable advance feature (as well as a dwell meter, volt meter and a tachometer) which will allow you to see how much advance you have at idle and what the total advance setting is.  You can plot the whole advance curve with that light, if you're so inclined.  It is basically like a $100 distributor tester that you hold in the palm of your hand. 

 

Combine that tool with an AFR gauge and it takes a lot of the mystery out of tuning.

 

I appreciate these cars for their lack of modern exectronix, but I'm happy to use modern tools to diagnose them.

 

Tom

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Thanks for the input , Tom. That timing light seems to be really practical, as it has the tachometer built into it. For 100 Clams, it sounds like a good deal, getting rid a lot of the guess work and headaches.

 

Slavs

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I expect Slavs ahs access to this, but for those wishing to follow along:

In the Engine Electrical section are advance curves and I believe the static method explained. Good for getting the engine running in order to use timing light.

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On 4/2/2021 at 11:31 AM, Hans said:

In the Engine Electrical section are advance curves and I believe the static method explained. Good for getting the engine running in order to use timing light.

Yes, I'm aware of that.

 

I've tried both methods, and I had less luck with the timing light as it is dependent on an accurate and steady tachometer reading. Over the the past 40 years I've almost always exclusively timed my cars using the static method. And, my engines idle and run flawlessly. They usually start on less than half a crank. It's "Old School", but very simple and effective. I'm willing to bet that my statically timed stock engines idle and run smoother than a lot of motors set with a timing light.

 

The issue I'm having with the distributor is completely unrelated to timing. I set the timing in the same manner using both, the 1600 specific distributor and the 2002 specific distributor. It's just that both of my 2002 specific distributors give the same result, stuttering. These distributors are the old style, cast, vs. the newer ones with alloy bodies. They came off 1968 2002s. The 1600 distributors also came off 1967-68 1600s. Next, I'll try a newer 2002 distributor.

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32 minutes ago, Slavs said:

Yes, I'm aware of that.

 

I've tried both methods, and I had less luck with the timing light as it is dependent on an accurate and steady tachometer reading. Over the the past 40 years I've almost always exclusively timed my cars using the static method. And, my engines idle and run flawlessly. They usually start on less than half a crank. It's "Old School", but very simple and effective. I'm willing to bet that my statically timed stock engines idle and run smoother than a lot of motors set with a timing light.

 

The issue I'm having with the distributor is completely unrelated to timing. I set the timing in the same manner using both, the 1600 specific distributor and the 2002 specific distributor. It's just that both of my 2002 specific distributors give the same result, stuttering. These distributors are the old style, cast, vs. the newer ones with alloy bodies. They came off 1968 2002s. The 1600 distributors also came off 1967-68 1600s. Next, I'll try a newer 2002 distributor.

I had a quick peak at 1600 vs 2002; didn't seem too far apart. Odd coincidence that both would be bad.

I have a 2000CS, static timing at zero per spec is a little shy on advance with replacement tii style dizzy and Webers. But yes, I used static for years with original 033 dizzy and twin Scolexes.

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On 4/4/2021 at 4:07 PM, jp5Touring said:

       I have this light, problem is it's smarter than me.

 

The variable advance feature is really fun to use.  Is that the smart part you're referring to?

 

Take Slavs' three distributors being discussed, for example.  He could install each one using his static timing method and then use the timing light as a measuring device to see what they're doing.

 

Once the distributor is installed and it's idling, he could point the light down the bell housing hole and bump the advance feature/button up until the OT line is lined up with the driver's side of the opening and that is the number of degrees of advance at idle.

 

Then, he could rev the engine and see the mark move and watch to see that it comes back down to the same spot ( repeatedly/consistently ).  The early style distributors with the tiny little springs that rub on lobes on the underside of the center post have a tendency to not return as they get worn/dirty/old.

 

It'd be interesting to compare the idle advance numbers for those three distributors after using the same static timing procedure.

 

It'd also be interesting to compare the total advance for all three.  As well as the RPM that all-in advance happens... and when the advance starts to come in... and where that puts the BB, just for shits and grins.

 

I like to use the BB for the high rpm testing, by simply adding advance to the 25 degree BB.  If I want to set total advance to 36, I'd just set the variable feature to 11 degrees and rev it until the BB appears; then rotate the distributor so that it does not go any higher than that and clamp it there.  After that, it's fun to go back and see where that leaves the idle rpm.

 

Often times, the idle rpm will be lower than desired, due to the worn parts causing it to give too much advance.  That's when you have to open the distributor up and shorten the curve.

 

The variable light will let you diagnose how the distributor is behaving and you can even plot the whole curve.  Then you can decide how to set the timing, based on that information.  Once you see where that puts the BB, then you could reset the timing with a standard light.  Although, I don't bother with standard lights anymore.  The 5568 has spoiled me.

 

Did you buy one yet, Slavs??  I'm on the edge of my seat!! :) 

 

Tom

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