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BarrettN

Inspecting a car while on trip - what to do\take? cheap 6v?

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OK, I'm going to be checking out a 02 that has not run for a long long time (~30 years) while on a trip. I'm limited by weight and bulk as to what I can take with me as I'm flying. The car is 6 volt, and I'm not sure that I'll be able to spin the engine to do a compression test on the motor. I'm kind of at a loss as to what to do besides just look at it.

 

Any suggestions on where I can buy an inexpensive 6 volt battery (is there such a thing?) just for testing it once I'm there (Arizona)

 

The car is sitting on jackstands. I'll have 5-6+ hours available to look at the car, so I don't think time will be a factor.

 

A big focus will be looking for rust - I've personally dismembered a 76 that had more rust that metal, so that along with my upbringing as child labor in my parent's body shop I think that I have that area pretty well covered. My 74 was pretty clean when I got it, so it hasn't taught me much yet about rust (hooray)!

 

Any suggestions as to what tools to bring with me, and what to do when I'm there?

 

So far:

 

Really strong LED flashlight

strong magnet to check for bondo

my el-cheapo Harbor Freight plastic case toolset - sockets, rachet, wrenches, pliers etc.

my big adjustable jaw wrench to see if I can turn the motor

compression tester in case I get lucky

borescope

 

On the way there I'll stop at an auto parts store and buy some spray engine cleaner, and shop rags to be able to clean off parts. PB Blaster also, some transmission fluid and acetone to dump down into the cylinders to start freeing up the rings so that eventually I can turn over the motor if I end up buying it.

 

To do:

 

use the borescope to take a peek inside the cylinders

I'm told it has a lsd, check that's true

pop the valve cover and look at the valve train for obvious problems

aside from all the visual inspection just looking at condition...... my list is waaaaay to short 

 

Help me out, I need suggestions!

 

Thanks,

Barrett

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Wow Barrett, that sounds like a nice find and a fun trip especially during these pandemic days. My ‘74 sat for over 30 years in a climate that was neither  particularly dry nor  particularly wet, but it was stored indoors ( Watertown, MA). It went 33 years between inspections.   I think the best thing I did was to resist the temptation to try and crank the engine after all that time until it could be soaked a bit.  I’m curious as to what somebody like Toby thinks as to how much you can accomplish in a six hour window regarding the engine.. I took a leap of faith, but I am happy that it really needed very little in the way of engine work, amazing how durable these machines are, even with that amount of neglect.  Keep us posted!  Tom

 

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(edited)

i would not try and spin the engine...if the rings are rusted you could damage something...knowing nothing about the car, i would bet that when you get it home and do some lubing the engine will turn with a 30mm socket on the crank bolt and a long ratchet

 

BTW..take what i say with a grain of salt...i'm an avid watcher/learner and not so much a doer

 

 

Edited by esty
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Honestly, Barrett,

 

If it hasn’t been run for 30 years, I’d be much more concerned whether the engine is frozen than whether it’s got good compression. When you jack up a rear wheel to determine whether it’s got an LSD, stick the car in gear and see if you can turn over the engine a hair. If so, stop there. If not, stop there.

 

The 6-volt cars are somewhat challenged in the engine cranking category anyway: my ‘67, many years ago, had to be on a charger overnight — even with a new battery — in order to crank the engine when temperatures dropped to 20-ish degrees. I picture most 6-volt portable batteries running out of juice before they get that engine to turn over after 30 years!

 

A 6-volt ‘02 (i.e., a 1600-2 before VIN 1533868) came originally with a long-neck 4.11 open diff. I’d bet that if this car has an LSD today, the rear subframe and diff have been swapped to short-neck versions.

 

For a 1966 or 1967 1600-2, I’d focus on rust and the rare early 1600-2 goodies, the ones that are hard to find today: embossed front hood molding, “football” windshield washer reservoir, aluminum interior rear view mirror, chrome-trimmed dash, two-spoke steering wheel, swan’s neck outside rearview mirror etc.

 

If you’re not particularly familiar with the 6-volt cars, I’d recommend you read Anders’ excellent ‘66 Bible, from the UK forum.

 

https://02forum.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=35&t=8603
 

Indeed, there are differences between ‘66 and ‘67 models, but they also share much, besides those 6-volt generators!

 

Best regards,

 

Steve

 

 

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I'd look at the body and take my chances with the motor. 

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33 minutes ago, Hans said:

I'd look at the body and take my chances with the motor. 


my thoughts as well. If it’s priced high enough that a good motor is a deal breaker then make the owner prove the motor is good. Otherwise offer what you think the body is worth and if you get a serviceable motor that’s a bonus. 

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(edited)

If it hasn't been mentioned I recommend you take a good inspection mirror to go with your strong LED flashlight.

Unless seller took some specific steps to preserve the engine, I would assume a 30 year old engine to be a "core"  and proceed from there. I wouldn't try to turn it over since it would be coming apart anyway.

Edited by tech71
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What they said.

 

Assume the engine needs a rebuild unless the seller can prove otherwise.

 

Don't put too much faith in the gearbox, either :)

 

Cheers,

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A friend and I inspected a '75 that had been sitting outside in Ohio for 15/16 years with no preservation done...We wanted to see if the engine was free, so removed the spark plugs but had to pull the radiator to get a socket on the crankshaft.  When the fan was in the way of the socket, I grabbed the fan belt to move the fan a few degrees, and as I did, realized I was actually turning the engine over!  A year or so later, after the brakes were rebuilt and the whole fuel system gone through, the engine started right up with a new battery and gas.  Still running fine.  

 

So take a spark plug wrench, pull the plugs squirt some light oil down each cylinder and try turning the engine over by hand with the fan belt (presuming it's tight).  In a dry climate like AZ, you may be pleasantly surprised.  

 

Good luck and keep us posted...unmolested 6v cars are pretty rare these days.

 

mike

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9 hours ago, Mike Self said:

A friend and I inspected a '75 that had been sitting outside in Ohio for 15/16 years with no preservation done

. . . and provided lots of great fodder for some Self-Propelled columns if I'm not mistaken! ;D

 

OT, what others have said, body >>> engine!

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For me it's all about the Rust and straight body, I don't care about the mechanicals at all, You haven't mentioned price so can't say to buy or not

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5 hours ago, AustrianVespaGuy said:

and provided lots of great fodder for some Self-Propelled columns if I'm not mistaken! ;D

Yep, Doc Fjord is alive and well, has taken several 100+ mile trips and is doing just fine.  A successful rescue!

 

mike

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Go to the TSA website and look what you can and cannot bring on a flight.  When I flew to Tampa (FL) to buy and drive my e30 home last November, the local TSA folks inspected the tools in my carry on bag. I used a gallon size ziplock bag.  Think you cannot have anything longer than 7”.  

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Arizona- the plastics and rubber will be completely rotten, most likely, if it's been in the sun or in an unvented building.

 

https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/traveller-1-6v-heavy-duty-battery

 

You can  buy a heavy truck or tractor battery once you're there,

and some jumper cables, since

anything readily available won't fit in the battery compartment.

 

But I agree, I wouldn't bother.  Put it in 4th, and see if you can

get the crank to wiggle, but don't count on it.  Likewise,

hydraulics will be shot, clutch rusted stuck,

and likely, the head will be corroded to

swiss cheese, if it wasn't drained before storage.

Figure the engine's a pig in a poke- if it turns out to be

salvageable, winner, but don't count on it.

 

Sheet metal and chrome and aluminum trim would be my concerns.

 

Actually, I'd just buy it, because I'm impulsive, but I get that some people are not.

 

t

 

 

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