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calw

Extricating windows from frames

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The roll up windows are mounted at the bottom in metal frames with  a rubber "U" strip lining between.  I've got several sets and want to remove the glass from the frames in order to refurb the metal frames. 

 

Great, except the glass is stuck to the rubber which is stuck to the metal frame.  Short of chemically eradicating the rubber strip with ?TBD?, there must be an easier way.  I couldn't find any previous posts about this situation.

 

Any ideas?

 

thanks!

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Maybe a single edge razor blade pushed between the glass and rubber would release the glass w/o damaging the rubber.

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You'll have to destroy the rubber part to remove the window.  I think they are both glued into the frame.  I've used some EPDM rubber sheet material to replace the rubber insulator.

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Destroy indeed, Hal.  it's old and tired, I've got the replacement rubber part, no problem there.  Just a question of how to get it out.  Prying gently between the rubber and the metal frame, no joy.  Prying harder, same.  Prying too hard - didn't try, the rubber is still soft enough to squish down and let the flat blade screwdriver press on the glass.    The metal frame is quite stiff. 

 

Jim's idea needs to be tried.

 

BTW, Jim, the two mystery parts that I showed you are "Distance rubber" 51326454169, and "Plate" 51326454325 and they go at the rear end of the bottom of the glass.  Not clear on their function until I disassemble one more door...

 

           

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3 broken single edge razor blades later (but no blood), the first one is starting to wiggle.  a combo of removing small bits of decayed rubber and separating the rubber from the glass from the metal track with the single edge may eventually do the trick.  for now, soaking sore fingers is in order.  Maybe a thin flexible knife will work better.  The inside is tough to get at with a razor blade due to the curvature of the glass.

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14 minutes ago, calw said:

Maybe a thin flexible knife will work better. 

 

These are nice blades (that typically fit into a scraper handle).  If you had a safe way to hold one, it would bend in against the glass nicely.  Adding water to the process might help the blade slip along.  Stay safe!  (common phrase these days)

 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/QEP-4-in-Wide-Replacement-Blade-for-Razor-Scrapers-and-Strippers-5-Pack-62901Q/100176483

 

QEP 4 in. Wide Replacement Blade for Razor Scrapers and Strippers (5-Pack)

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Red Devil paint scraper for paint on glass uses a razor blade.

Red Devil Scraper.jpg

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Heat. 

 

Try to get the metal clip as hot as you can.

 

But of course, be careful not to unevenly heat the glass...

 

t

<pop>

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Jim, got one of those, but the thickness of the tool overcomes the width of the razor blade, can't get it in the slot.

 

Thought of heat, Toby, but not sure how much is too much.  exploding tempered glass doesn't appeal.  I've got two sets, so I'm practicing on the newer blue tint glass before I try my precious clear windows.  If it becomes too mush stress (for me, not the glass)

I'm gonna mask off the glass and clean/paint the metal channel while still attached.  It lasted 50 years so far and isn't in that bad a condition.  Back on this tomorrow when it warms up, cold wet day here...

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If it’s the same “setting tape” that I have experience with with old cars I’ve found WD-40 softens it up quite nicely. It makes it easy to set tight glass and will help to release stuck glass. If it is indeed glued... acetone? 

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A thin wire used to slice between the rubber and metal like a cheese wire, then once out, a razor scraper to remove rubber.

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Final report... After trying every trick in my personal repertoire, I admit defeat.  Note to the next contestant- These did not work- single edge razor blades, painter's palette knife(2 sizes), thin ginsu magic steak knife, heat (as much as I dared), garrote wire, water, soapy water, alcohol, acetone (0vernight soak in a long tray).

 

These were tried on a windows removed from a '69 and a '76.  No difference, No effect, No fun. Both windows had minimal rust on the outside bottom of the metal frame and rusty cotter pins.  The rubber was mostly still a bit pliable. 

 

For anyone wanting to try, I can only suggest that you not do it dry- water is needed while digging between the metal/rubber/glass to avoid scratching the glass, as there is an accumulation of grit and grime down there.

 

My windows are clearly not going anywhere, so the tracks at the bottom have been cleaned, primed, and painted, with new cotter pins installed. 

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used the orange 4 inch wide tape they use for asbestos removal,tape the glass well where it meets the rubber  use a small hand sand blaster, blast the metal, etch prime the metal, prime and paint any color you want and call it good, some times you can screw up stuff that does not need to be done, are you going to see it in the door? no,  controlling rust is the goal    Bruce Mtuner

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