Jump to content
hnichols

Grinding in reverse

9 posts / 292 viewsLast Reply

Recommended Posts

Hello everybody,

My '76 (standard four speed) will sometimes (about a third of the time) grind if I carelessly push the lever into reverse (you can feel a bit of resistance before that happens, so I just go back into neutral, let out the clutch, then move the lever around with the clutch depressed and it will slide right into reverse. Not a huge problem, and has always been that way (I've owned the car since '10).  My question is:  does that sound like a problem internal to the gearbox or an issue with the shifter linkage that might be amenable to adjustment? 

Thanks in advance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I had to hazard a guess, it would be clutch hydraulics most likely, and internal to the gearbox least, with linkage in the middle.  The shift linkage isn't adjustable, so there would have to be a lot of wear for what you describe to happen.  And those 4 speed boxes are pretty reliable--the first thing to wear out is usually the synchronizers.   However if the clutch isn't fully disengaging, reverse is the first place that grinding would be noticeable, as it's the only gear that isn't synchronized.  It also could be a nearly worn-out clutch disk, but I'd investigate the clutch hydraulics first.

 

mike

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is hard to know who you are and what experiences you have had in your driving life.  Something we have become accustomed to over the last 30-40 years is manual transmissions with Synchronizers on reverse gear.  Not that the manufacturers were planning on you trying to select reverse while moving but more to stop the spinning gears inside the transmission when you try and select reverse.  With the engine running and the clutch engaged with the transmission in neutral just about everything inside the transmission is spinning right along with the engine, when you depress the clutch you disengage the drive but the gears inside the transmission are still spinning until friction and the drag of spinning in the oil inside the box bring them to a stop.  The 2002 transmission does not have a synchronizer so if you try and shift into reverse before the gears stop spinning you will have a "grinding" problem.  

 

As Mike said you may have a problem with the clutch hydraulics not completely disengaging the clutch, thus keeping the gears spinning.  Or a problem with the input shaft pilot bearing or clutch it's self.  

 

The way us old timers used to do it was depress the clutch and lightly try and put the transmission in 1st or 2nd gear (you don't have to go all the way in, just enough to have the synchronizer stop the gears from spinning) then go into reverse. You can always just wait 3-4sec for the gears to stop on their own.   I have gotten very lazy because all of my usual daily drivers have reverse gear synchronizers and when I jump into one of the 2002s I always rush putting them in reverse at least once.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The shafts are still spinning when you shift into reverse.  Depress the clutch, shift to a forward gear, then shift to reverse or wait after depressing the clutch for the shafts to stop turning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

+1 on both responders. Also clutch linkage i.e.: clevis pins,plastic bushings and attaching parts. There should only be about an inch of play at the top of clutch pedal movement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve posted this response several times before, but don’t think anyone has heeded my advice because it is so obvious.  Check your floor mat position. If it gets behind the clutch pedal, it could prevent full disengagement.

 

Most folks never bleed the clutch hydraulics so that’s another possibility.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, jgerock said:

Most folks never bleed the clutch hydraulics so that’s another possibility.

This is true and boy does it get nasty🤢.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everybody (it's been a long time since I've posted here, so it's nice to see some familiar folks responding!)  Anyway, as for Preyupy's question:  No, it's never a matter of me shifting into reverse on the move; just the opposite:  it's usually when I'm backing out of the garage.  I'm actually very old-school with my shifting, usually double-clutching by habit (even though I don't have to). 

 

I'll check the clutch pedal action, but honestly I doubt it's either a worn clutch (as I said, it's been an issue since I got the car 10 years ago, and it hasn't gotten progressively worse) or deferred maintenance on the hydraulics (I've been bleeding and replacing fluid for brakes and clutch every two years).  It could indeed be worn synchros, but if that's the case, why does it slot in most of the time without any notchiness whatsoever?

 

Two years ago I replaced the plastic bits in the shifter mechanism, but that didn't have any effect on this particular issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/12/2020 at 6:17 PM, coloincaalpine said:

+1 on both responders. Also clutch linkage i.e.: clevis pins,plastic bushings and attaching parts. There should only be about an inch of play at the top of clutch pedal movement.

I'm favoring the hypothesis that the problem lies in the clutch pedal hitting the floor before its work is completely done.  I'm wondering if someone could post a picture or a good description of what I should be looking for when I crawl under the car -- i.e. the parts mentioned in coloincaalpine's post above.

 

Many thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.