Jump to content
  • When you click on links to various merchants on this site and make a purchase, this can result in this site earning a commission. Affiliate programs and affiliations include, but are not limited to, the eBay Partner Network.

Rear Wheel Bearing Sleeve Wear and Measurements


2002#3

Recommended Posts

I have read service manual (SM) info posted FAQ info on the subject of using shims to space rear wheel bearings; however, I want to make sure I understand.

 

Status:

-- Replacing stub axle, bearing, and seals, one side at a time.

-- Both ends of the wheel bearing sleeve have flat-bottom 0.2-mm-deep grooves. 

-- Sleeve measurements:  unworn rim-to-unworn rim, 64 mm; groove-to-groove, 63.6 mm.  Bearing stop-to-bearing stop, 60.7 mm.

-- no wear on hub or stub axle contact points

-- The only shim in place is the standard 3 mm shim.

-- Following SM guide for calculations.

 

Q:  How does one take into account sleeve wear when calculating appropriate shim thickness - simply follow SM and use whatever shim results in 0.1 mm of play?

Q:  Use the 64 mm or the 63.6 mm for the sleeve measurement?

Q:  Should calculations indicate an increase or decrease in shim thickness with sleeve wear?  My calculations indicate decreasing shim thickness to 2.8 mm (63.6 - 60.7 - 0.1 = 2.8).

Q:  0.2 mm wear on each end is OK, so reassemble with new parts, carry on with the 3 mm shim, and have a G & T?

 

Thanks,

 

Larry

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Larry,

 

Fairly sure your calculations of 2.8mm are correct. As you recall I put 90K on Vern before he was restored. Afterward I was replacing the passenger side rear every 7K miles. VSR measured 6 ways to Sunday, measuring a dozen times and found my bearings had zero play and were way too tight. Think the overall shims on the passenger side are 2.5 mm. I recall they had to mill one shim in half to get 2.5.

 

Drove all 2019 with zero noise or bearing issues. So they nailed it!.  

 

Andrew Wilson
Vern- 1973 2002tii, https://www.bmw2002faq.com/blogs/blog/304-andrew-wilsons-vern-restoration/ 
Veronika- 1968 1600 Cabriolet, Athena- 1973 3.0 CSi,  Rodney- 1988 M5, The M3- 1997 M3,

The Unicorn- 2007 X3, Julia- 2007 Z4 Coupe, Ophelia- 2014 X3, Herman- 1914 KisselKar 4-40

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quote

A: Both ends of the wheel bearing sleeve have flat-bottom 0.2-mm-deep grooves. 

II.Sleeve measurements:  unworn rim-to-unworn rim, 64 mm; groove-to-groove, 63.6 mm.  Bearing stop-to-bearing stop, 60.7 mm.

3: no wear on hub or stub axle contact points

 

A: you need new sleeve(s).  They aren't supposed to be worn at all.

   In fact, they should present a flat surface to the hub and inner bearing race, as their unit loading is

     already nearly too high for what they are, statically assembled.  Put some cornering load

     in there, and it's even worse.

 

II. see A, above.

 

3- Well, huh.  Are you dead sure?  Then someone's been in there, and replaced

all the expensive parts, and forgot the easy one.  Get new sleeves, and measure again.

And put up pix of your mating surfaces.

 

iiii. I've cut, ground, re- surfaced and re- shimmed stubs in 3 or 4 ways, and as long as the 

    bearings are not preloaded hard against each other, it all works pretty well.

    The only thing that really matters is that the space between the inner race and the outer race

    is the same.  Everything else can move (a little, you do want the brake shoes to hit the drum)

 

t

Loose Balls Last a Long Time.

Edited by TobyB

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I find the challenging part about the job you’re doing is finding a method/tool to accurately measure the distance between the ‘bearing stops’ inside the trailing arm. I finally made an almost-bearing-size device I can slide into the trailing arm, which makes it easier to plunge a caliper tip and get a reading.

 

And when it doesn’t all work, shim-zies. -KB

 

A54ACFE9-ABF7-4871-9474-A0EF347AFC20.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, kbmb02 said:

I find the challenging part about the job you’re doing is finding a method/tool to accurately measure the distance between the ‘bearing stops’ inside the trailing arm. I finally made an almost-bearing-size device I can slide into the trailing arm, which makes it easier to plunge a caliper tip and get a reading.

 

And when it doesn’t all work, shim-zies. -KB

 

A54ACFE9-ABF7-4871-9474-A0EF347AFC20.jpeg

Is the table on that surface grinder magnetic?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Upcoming Events

  • Supporting Vendors

×
×
  • Create New...