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halboyles

NK Factory Production

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Meet NK Hans and Franz--when they actually built the cars.  

 

See if you can spot the 2002 toward the end of the film.  It has a flat tire!

 

 

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(edited)

At least some of those parts being stamped around 1:08-1:20 are 2002 parts--front fenders, rear inner fender arches and quarter panels...floorpan welding  up at 2:04, roof-less shell at 2:25.  At 3:27 you can see why those big holes in the front floorboards are there...then just after that "rustproofing" paint segment they switch to NK sedan production for the remainder of the film.  Even the engine production shots are (probably) NK as they all have three finger clutches, which were superseded on 2002s in March 1969.  Neat film.

 

mike

Edited by mike
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I'm surprised at how automated that process was. I always assumed there was a lot more hand-fitting on these cars, just based on BMW's relatively small size and limited means in the '60's. 

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10 hours ago, Sahara said:

I'm surprised at how automated that process was.

All those automated machines that took the raw block castings and bored, milled drilled and tapped them for assembly--and did them without any human handling.  The block was transferred from one machine to another robotically.  That entire transfer machine operation was invented by Renault for engine block production on the 4CV back in 1947.  

 

10 hours ago, Sahara said:

I always assumed there was a lot more hand-fitting on these cars,

There was a lot of hand fitting--did you see the cars being painted by people (wearing pretty basic masks!), the hand-sanding, and installing the seats by hand?  All that is automated now, even installing windshields and seats.  If you get a chance, tour a modern assembly line; it's fascinating to see how much of the build is automated.  I toured the BMW plant at Spartanburg back in 2000, and again in 2013, and the added automation just in that period was amazing.  

 

mike

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1 hour ago, mike said:

All those automated machines that took the raw block castings and bored, milled drilled and tapped them for assembly--and did them without any human handling.  The block was transferred from one machine to another robotically.  That entire transfer machine operation was invented by Renault for engine block production on the 4CV back in 1947.  

 

There was a lot of hand fitting--did you see the cars being painted by people (wearing pretty basic masks!), the hand-sanding, and installing the seats by hand?  All that is automated now, even installing windshields and seats.  If you get a chance, tour a modern assembly line; it's fascinating to see how much of the build is automated.  I toured the BMW plant at Spartanburg back in 2000, and again in 2013, and the added automation just in that period was amazing.  

 

mike

You're right - but I guess I was thinking in terms of some pics I've seen of 356 and early 911 production which is literally a couple of guys with toolboxes sitting/standing around a shell and putting together a car. 

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i liked the shot of the slide rule. I still have mine somewhere.

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Agree, almost all of those body parts going by are 02.  Including this left quarter with fuel opening.  I don't think I've ever seen a 2002 with left side gas cap.  Flipped negative maybe?

 

Gotta remember the 60's weren't exactly caveman days.  We were building 747s and going to the moon in 1969.

LHGAS.JPG

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This video is terrific.  Too bad I don't understand German, but that doesn't really matter.  I will mention just a couple of things: 

1) balancing the driveshaft seemed to be very carefully done in a fairly long process with small balance weight plates being welded onto the shaft guided by three balance sensors.  I want to see if the driveshaft on my car has any of those balance plates welded in place. 

2) Seeing the head coming down the fairly steep roller ramp at a pretty good clip then crashing into another head waiting in front of it was a surprise.  Doesn't seem like a good practice, but it's probably OK since these guys sure seem to be very careful with their processes.

 

Thanks for posting this.

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