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Crash513

Testing the waters: Re-imagined early grill sets for 2002's

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3 hours ago, Mike G said:


yeah, basically the looks of stock but with the durability of billet. I know it’ll be more expensive than a printed plastic version but I think if he turned out a quality product there would be a market for it considering NOS sets are around $1500. 

Thank helps, Mike.  I think I'm getting your vision.  We will discuss it.  Anything is possible if there is a market!

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On 12/2/2019 at 11:31 PM, MKINNA said:

I would love to have a couple sets for my racecar, seeing the prices on the rise for original parts would make a lot of sense for a few of us that race


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

Nothing better than tire marbles taking out the aluminum grilles on early 02’s while on the track....I was always missing a few slats!

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(edited)
13 hours ago, Crash513 said:

I don't see why not. 

Sorry, don't want to be a naysayer.  But, most 3D printer filaments have relatively low melting points.  Also, not much is known about their flame, smoke and toxicity properties.  The engine bay environment with the high heat and various gasoline/oil fumes will be very hostile to many of the available 3D filaments.  Structural integrity and chemical resistance would be problematic.  What if one of these 3D printed fuse blocks catches on fire or failed while in operation?

Edited by Tsingtao_1903
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1 hour ago, Tsingtao_1903 said:

Sorry, don't want to be a naysayer.  But, most 3D printer filaments have relatively low melting points.  Also, not much is known about their flame, smoke and toxicity properties.  The engine bay environment with the high heat and various gasoline/oil fumes will be very hostile to many of the available 3D filaments.  Structural integrity and chemical resistance would be problematic.  What if one of these 3D printed fuse blocks catches on fire or failed while in operation?

 

Definitely good points to be considered.  In my novice opinion, this would have to be researched fully before you start making components to go under the hood.  I suppose if 3D printed parts were that tolerant to heat and chemicals, people would be re-imagining things like intake manifolds by now.   

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2 hours ago, Tsingtao_1903 said:

Sorry, don't want to be a naysayer.  But, most 3D printer filaments have relatively low melting points.  Also, not much is known about their flame, smoke and toxicity properties.  The engine bay environment with the high heat and various gasoline/oil fumes will be very hostile to many of the available 3D filaments.  Structural integrity and chemical resistance would be problematic.  What if one of these 3D printed fuse blocks catches on fire or failed while in operation?

Good points, I have no experience with 3D printing, so I guess a little naive. Would be nice though, tired of those torpedo fuses.

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