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MikeD

1973 2002 on BAT

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I was just about to start a thread on this one!  All I can say is uhh...Damn...

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(edited)

It belonged to an faq'er until the flipper bought it a month ago.  Car was a regular at the Vintage.

Edited by mlytle
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(edited)

VIN 2588828

 

This car looks gorgeous. Great color combination. Factory sunroof — well, we’ll get to that. Someone dropped a boatload of money and/or effort on this car. But aren’t any of you concerned about the following fact:

 

“A donor car was sourced at that time for body repairs, and the chassis stamping for the donor is present on the passenger fender.”
 

Uh...uh...what?

 

So either (a.) the right inner fender from VIN 2534320, with chassis VIN, was transferred to VIN 2588828, or (b.) the entire shell of VIN 2534320 was loaded with the “accoutrements” of VIN 2588828 — a classic “rebody”.

 

This is disclosed, sort of. So kudos for that. But you’re left with a car that wears two VIN’s, and your chassis VIN — the most important one in my opinion — is not the VIN on your title. That’s a problem.

 

So is Agave the original color for VIN 2588828, for VIN 2534320, or neither? We know from the window sticker that VIN 2588828 had a factory sunroof. Did the current car’s sunroof come from VIN 2588828, or from 2534320? The engine block appears to have a casting date of February 2, 1973 — which could potentially fit with VIN 2588828’s February 1973 manufacturing date — but I’m not immediately finding a photo of the engine number.

 

The car’s beautiful. It wins awards. But this should not be a record-setting sale if buyers are focusing on this very “awkward” fact!

 

Call me a fuddy-duddy — and you’ll likely be right — but “I like me a good single-VIN car”... 😋 

 

Regards,

 

Steve

 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by Conserv
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Steve,

you hit the nail on the head.  I think bidders are focusing on the paperwork, and the trophies.  That said, that kind of stuff sells cars.  His presentation on BAT isn't hurting him either.  Lots of great photos, including closeups of problem areas, a great write up and a posting from the previous owner who did the work in the comments.  All that helps.  Marshall pointing out that a flipper bought it doesn't surprise me considering the presentation.  He's ticked all the marks to make a big $ sale on BAT.  Good for all of us I guess, but someone's gonna pay a premium for the car.  It won't approach what the guy the flipper bought it from has in it, but that's how this game works..sadly.

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(edited)

Agreed.  Seller might think the timing is right after the Inka car that sold recently for high $'s, but that's a quick jump.  Shenanigans?

Edited by Tdh

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Maybe the Inka buyer is on this one too LOL, Cornering the market  A jump like that is just stupid with 5 days to go

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I agree with Steve, the stamped VIN on the inner fender dictates the car's VIN. The plate VIN & the one on the steering cover can be easily removed/swapped. Whilst I realise the stamped VIN can be changed, it's a lot harder to do.

 

So, if the authorities look at this car's stamped VIN & compare it to the VIN on the title...…..what then?

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Well, there was a big stink in the Series/Defender Land Rover community over this same issue.  Old Rovers have riveted on number plates, and a matching stamping on the frame.  Later Defenders were being imported as early Series trucks and the authorities were none the wiser...until they were.  A guy in North Carolina got popped with a whole bunch of trucks like this.  Now imported Rovers are watched pretty closely.  To make things more interesting, aftermarket galvanized frames are a popular upgrade to older Series trucks (original frames on old farm trucks rust).  You guesses it!  A new galvanized frame won't have a stamping on it anywhere.  That can make things interesting at the port.  

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Get out your flashlight boys. This one would take quite some time and effort to verify the welding and body work. Kudos to the seller disclosing the double VIN fact, but I'm with Steve. Seam sealer can hide a lot of shoddy body work. The original car must've been some rusty mess to have to go through this process. 

 

Saying that, the owner had to be in it for over $30K to get it to where it is today. So....I'm guessing even at $30K, it'll be RNM. which means, we're staring at mid-high $30's for non tii cars. I'll also go out on a limb and throw the 'shill bidder' theory out there.

 

I GUESS that's good for all of us. High tide floating all boats and everything....but geez louise.

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There are no shill bidders on BAT. Bids are binding. BAT has bidders' credit cards so if they don't pay, they are charged $500. Sometimes people think the bidding works like Ebay and overbid.

Simplest answer is usually right-- someone has money to spend and likes a pretty car.

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3 hours ago, mccusername said:

There are no shill bidders on BAT. Bids are binding. BAT has bidders' credit cards so if they don't pay, they are charged $500. Sometimes people think the bidding works like Ebay and overbid.

Simplest answer is usually right-- someone has money to spend and likes a pretty car.

Not necessarily.

 

Let's say you and I are friends. I tell you the reserve on my car and ask you to bid it to below my reserve just to get things going.

 

In this case, the reserve could be $31K. The $30K bid would be RNM. Shill.

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Yeah, that's probably what happens at least half the time... and the reason prices are so high... it's all BAT's fault 🙄

In your example the shill bid still below reserve, so someone-- a real buyer-- still has to decide the car is worth the price. Maybe a shill bid has such a powerful psychological effect... or maybe some people have money, like shiny cars, and don't care/research enough. 

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