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Whaledriver

M10 motor spark plug socket size and turn signal bulb # ? ?

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I for the first time tried to remove the spark plugs on my 1973 2002. I tried numerous deep sockets from my tool set of both standard and metric  but none would reach the plug without binding against the socket well! Do I need a thin wall deep socket and what size? Also when I went to buy a replacement blub for my left front turn signal, the parts salesman, after checking his catalog, issued me a blub with only one base contact, when  I can only assume since it must work as a parking light and a blinker it should have two base contacts. What is the proper bulb number and are install slots staggered or same level;?

 
 

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13/16" deep socket

 

dual filament bulb 21/5W double contact base with offset pins.

 

here is some helpful bulb information

 

 

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(edited)

NGK BP6ES are good plugs, if you're replacing yours.

I believe the recommended plug gap range is .024"-.028" and keep in mind that the gap grows as they wear.

 

I'll add that these plugs are often referred to as NGK 7333 


Tom

Edited by '76mintgrün'02

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25 minutes ago, Whaledriver said:

Do I need a thin wall deep socket

Std spark plug sockets work for me.

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The low profile euro front signal lights are mono filament and some of the early US cars had both the mono filament and a separate small driving light bulb, depends on the year of your car and whether it has been modified over time.

Standard plug wrench from a kit should be deep enough unless something is on the end of the plug, like a detached fitting from a plug wire. If you have a mirror and flashlight you can play gynecologist on your car

Sent from my STH100-1 using Tapatalk

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If you are having trouble with the standard deep 13/16" spark plug sockets it is possible that someone has used a non standard plug in your engine.  Try a 5/8" plug socket it might be one of the "small hex" style plugs (it's hard to look down in the pocket and see the plug without a bore scope) 

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I agree that it extremely difficult to see down the plug pocket. My particular plug position has a broken ceramic  plug contact. I'll borrow a bore scope to determine if maybe there is part of a chip lodged next to the plug preventing full insertion.  

 
 
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Evidently, there are at least 4 different sizes of Spark Plug sockets, 9/16, 5/8, 13/16, and 14mm. I have always used a 13/16 to remove the plugs in my 2002.


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This forum is great for finding solutions to weird issues. I went down to Harbor Freight  and bought a cheap borescope which highlighted the fact that I indeed had bakelight chips wedged deep beside the sparkplug preventing inserting a deep socket to fit on the sparkplug. I was able with some effort move the wedges around enough with a pick to finally get the socket to take hold of the sparkplug and remove it. I then used high pressure air to blow the broken chips out. The recommendation to use a 13/16ths deep socket was accurate as I verified the fit by trying it on one of the unobstructed sparkplugs. I assume the cause of a broken bakelight fitting was a bent sparkplug tip which the previous owner had tried to force the fitting on. Now all I have to do is replace the one  NGK R BPR 5ES sparkplug.  Thanks to all who responded. 

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1 hour ago, Whaledriver said:

Now all I have to do is replace the one  NGK R BPR 5ES sparkplug. 

 

I consider myself frugal, but I'd still take this opportunity to replace the plugs.  All four of them

 

BP6ES or BP5ES, but not BPR.  No need for resistor plugs.

 

Did you blow the chips out with the plug hole open?

If so, I'd be concerned about having blown some into the cylinder.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Whaledriver said:

This forum is great for finding solutions to weird issues. I went down to Harbor Freight  and bought a cheap borescope which highlighted the fact that I indeed had bakelight chips wedged deep beside the sparkplug preventing inserting a deep socket to fit on the sparkplug. I was able with some effort move the wedges around enough with a pick to finally get the socket to take hold of the sparkplug and remove it. I then used high pressure air to blow the broken chips out. The recommendation to use a 13/16ths deep socket was accurate as I verified the fit by trying it on one of the unobstructed sparkplugs. I assume the cause of a broken bakelight fitting was a bent sparkplug tip which the previous owner had tried to force the fitting on. Now all I have to do is replace the one  NGK R BPR 5ES sparkplug.  Thanks to all who responded. 

With regard to the turn signal bulb, the suggested P25-2 21/5W with offset securing pins was the right one. Previously the left turn signal was hardly noticeable when selected due to PO installing an incorrect model bulb. Now it is nice and bright. 

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40 minutes ago, '76mintgrün'02 said:

 

I consider myself frugal, but I'd still take this opportunity to replace the plugs.  All four of them

 

BP6ES or BP5ES, but not BPR.  No need for resistor plugs.

 

Did you blow the chips out with the plug hole open?

If so, I'd be concerned about having blown some into the cylinder.

 

 

I counted three chips with the borescope and when I blew it out, three chips came flying out. There wasn't much room to insert a plug without the possibility of shoving the chips in the hole. .Is there any disadvantage of using resistor plug?

 
 

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1 minute ago, Whaledriver said:

Is there any disadvantage of using resistor plug?

 

 

Y e s .

 

It'd also be  d i s a d v a n t a g e o u s   to put one fresh plug in with three old ones.

 

 

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