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Finally got to the bottom of my slave cylinder problem


Guest Anonymous

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Guest Anonymous

... It was my mechanic. He ordered the wrong slave cylinder twice, which is why I have now replaced my slave cylinder three times and my master once since November.

Parts + labor = $1,000 + in expensis :\

grr. European specialist nothing! :P

/endrant

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Guest Anonymous

My "specialist" thinks that a rocker cover gasket for an M10 costs $31.00.

They also have various "pat answers" that subtly inform me that they haven't got an idea as to what's wrong...only that if I mentioned it, that CAN'T be the problem.

Current Favorite? "That (connector, sender unit, servo, relay, solenoid, pump) rarely goes 'bad'."

P.S. I use "guys" as a collective term. I could be referring to a woman.

It's the same as when other board members and I provide information or assistance to someone and they say "thanks, guys." I assume that they also include me.

D

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Guest Anonymous

they are everywhere, it is amazing how people that are

supposed to know, don't think. Also the stereotype that only

women don't know anything about cars, doesn't apply

anymore. It is kind of a loss art accross the board. Just

yesterday I was recruited by my son's friend to change his

headlamp bulb (he had gotten a fix it ticket), he couldn't

figuer out how! He gets in the car turns the lights on (to show

me which side was off) I bang on the headlamp with my palm

and the light goes on. He gets out of the car thinking I am

sort of wizard, magician, genious, he just couldn't believe it.

Anyway, sex has nothing to do with it. I have ordered

thousands of parts in the bodyshop, and the best parts

persons - most accurate (nicest and most professional too)

have always been women! It is true, I swear!

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Guest Anonymous

I went to the only BMW independent garage in town to ask about some spark plug wires, he said that he didnt got any kind of spark plug wires for my engine, but he have some for 320i/318...how can one explain to him that all those older bmw have a m10 in?? he dont know what is a m10 anyway...

Pat Allen

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Guest Anonymous

In that reference, I believe it means a "standard" answer they would give without spending the energy to research and find a more correct answer.

To have something "down pat" would be to have it perfectly mastered! But that is not related to your question! ;-)

Cheers,

Ray

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Guest Anonymous

..I thought you were joking.

"Pat," in this case, means "contrived."

A mechanic, who is considered an "expert" by his definition and (at least some) others, is rarely challenged by knowledgeable customers. Further, he or she doesn't like to be questioned about his or her competence, ability or God forbid, be offered suggestions by his less knowledgeable and unworthy customers, no matter how capable the customer may be.

"Contrived" or "pat" answers to a customers inquiry may be a way for the expert mechanic to dismiss the customer's question or complaint to keep their ego and reputation intact. By saying something like, "They RARELY go bad," there is an air of superiority, long term expertise and confidence, that, as soon as the car owner is out of sight, sends them right over to try the customer's theory.

While the customer may or may not be right, the "pat answer" is a worthy "contrivance."

:)

D

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Guest Anonymous

I bought a rebuilt steeering rack for my E30 yesterday from a place in California.

The parts person, a woman named Rhea, was refreshingly competent. She also handles all of the returned cores for the company - that assures that I will get my refund when the time comes.

The local British expert (MG, Triumph, Bentley, Riley, Wolsely, etc.) shop has been in business for thirty-five years. The parts manager, Lisa, is an absolute walking encyclopedia of parts, part numbers and information. Further, she remembers names of customers past and present with amazing clarity and accuracy.

Delia

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Guest Anonymous

I had a bad experience of a similar nature with my first 02. After a number of return trips to the local "experts" I finally bought a Haynes manual and some tools and started doing my own work. In reality, there are very few experts, but a lot of people who pretend to know more than you do and are happy to take your money.

I even had a time when I asked a local shop to test/replace the alternator on my E28 because it had displayed signs of impending doom. They said it was fine, but the following week I found myself stranded by the side of the road with a dead battery & alternator. It was the time I wasted that day pissed me off the most because it could have been easily prevented.

On a positive note, I have a fantastic relationship with the service people (Wagner Subaru in Fairborn, OH) that work on my Subaru. Now I don't think of my next new car in terms of what CAR I will buy but what SUBARU I will buy. Mind you, Subarus aren't the best cars in the world, but a good service department can encourage brand loyalty.

Whew... sorry to get so long-winded, but customer service is a sensitive area for me.

Karl

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