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roman.lysiak

Cracked tii header

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I knew the engine sounded crappy on full throttle. Here it is. Has anyone ever had the header welded as a repair? I have another one but not sure if it’s a tii. So many threads about them but still not sure. Here’s a photo of replacement option.

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Let me know your thoughts.

Roman

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Just use the replacement. Looks good. 

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If you can find a local shop that specializes in welding cracked engine blocks (i.e. cast iron), they should be able to weld up your cracked manifold properly.  Before re-using it after welding, I'd run a straightedge along the mating surface with the cylinder head to make sure it wasn't warped during the welding process.  If it's not flat, it's a simple process for a machine shop to plane it flat.

 

Since it's a tii manifold, and they're not common but are desirable, it's worth the effort to repair.

 

mike

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It seems like you should be able to compare them side-by-side and see whether they are both Tii manifolds.  It might be fun to tape the inlets shut and fill them both up with water, then measure it, to see if they hold the same amount.

 

The 'two barrel' design of the manifold means that the crack may be 'complicated'.  Meaning, the crack you see on the outside is only part of the problem.  When I removed the stock manifold from my car I found this crack. 

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It'd be interesting to see what the inside of yours looks like. 

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I don't see how you could get a weld in there and the extreme heat cycling makes me a bit pessimistic about the longevity of the repair.

 

As for flattening the surface, I had good luck removing pitting from the one I bought, using a belt sander, followed by a mill file.

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(edited)

Roman,

 

Your spare looks like a common tii manifold to me: casting number “120 142 01 80 1”. There were at least three different versions of the tii manifold, so this is not the only “tii manifold.” As a double check, make certain the manifold has no injection nozzles and no tapped ports for an air pump fitting: this version should have neither.

 

But, following Mike’s point. Don’t trash a tii manifold just because it’s cracked. Get it repaired and keep it as a spare!

 

Regards,

 

Steve

 

Edited by Conserv

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Ok, gonna swap it out for what I have and look for a shop to weld the cast ( fist assess if its a complicated crack).

 

Does anyone know if napa carries the 5 exhaust gaskets and 8 nuts. Want to get this done before Thursday. Heading down to the PVGP.

 

Roman

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Nice that you have a spare there. 

 

I enjoy that thread where everyone questions whether a Tii manifold makes any perceptible difference.

 

Have you considered using the e21 exhaust gasket with the built in heat shield?

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here is an image taken from Roger's Tii

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http://www.rogerstii.com/bmw-2002-320i-318i-exhaust-manifold-gasket-heat-shield/

 

Seems like NAPA ought to have copper clad nuts for the manifold's studs.  Might as well get three new ones for the downpipe attachment as well.

 

Make sure the upper studs are seated/sealed, so that they do not allow oil to seep through.  I pulled mine and cleaned the threads, installed studs with red loc-tite, that sat overnight.  Then tightened the nuts.

 

 

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I'd say weldable. I've got a Tii manifold I need to clean up, weld, then find a home for (I run headers).It's doable with a MIG if you preheat and then slowly cool (bury in sand post welding)

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(edited)

I have only had luck nickel welding and brazing cast-

 

any of the steel processes just cracked at the fusion line.

 

That said, nickel welding's done just fine on several manifolds-

it's kind of like hot- melt glue, and you chamfer the heck out of

the crack.  Drill the ends, too, if you're sure where they are.

Then pre and post- heat pretty carefully, to something pretty warm

(600f has worked for me)

A lot of times the weld takes the stress off the ends of the crack, so that

it stabilizes.

 

Occasionally, it doesn't work.  The stresses keep working at the

ends, and the crack continues, often to break everywhere BUT
the weld.

 

Doing it myself, it's always

been worth the pound of rod (heh) just for the learning experience.

And often, I get a usable manifold in the process!

 

t

runs headers

Edited by TobyB
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One of the hardest parts of welding cast exhaust manifolds is the contamination from the carbon deposits inside the cracks.  Like Toby I have found pre/post heating and nickel filler rod to be what works for me.  I had a Turbo manifold repaired many years ago by a guy that pieces old Hemi blocks back together and it has stood up very well (they are cast stainless !!) 

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