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sam1904

Help me understand front suspension 'spacers'

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(edited)

OK, So starting to put the front suspension back together.

I bought the IE fixed front camber plates because...well.. I was just buying other stuff and they sounded cool...

Image 1. shows an image I found on this site as to what the standard assembly should look like and how to assemble these magic plates.

Image 2. shows what I found including an additional spacer (maybe 10 mm from memory) that was in place and looks stock.

 

I assume that the IE plate is to lower the suspension assembly a little, however if I was to remove the aluminum spacer and then add the IE plate it would actually raise the assembly (IE plate is thinner).

 

Thoughts?

 

Right now I am thinking of just rebuilding with those stock spacers, new upper strut bearings and returning the IE plates?

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Edited by sam1904

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The aluminum spacer was meant to raise the front of the vehicle to get the bumper to the required height. Most people remove it to lower the front for appearances. Early cars didn’t have that spacer. The fixed camber plate from IE adds 5/8’ of camber to improve handling. You’ll need to knock the studs out of your new strut bearings to install the camber plates. I don’t think you’ll be able to reinstall the aluminum spacer with your new strut bearings as the studs don’t look long enough. 

 

Id install the camber plates, leave out the aluminum spacers. If the nose looks lower than the rear go to a thinner spring pad in the back. They have dots to determine thickness, less dots are thinner so if you a two dot go to a one dot, etc. 

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The fixed camber plate will give you 0.5 deg. more negative camber, which is probably a little better turn-in than stock for street use. I used the IE camber plates on a new build, so can’t give an opinion over the stock camber. I did not use the stock spacer you pictured. The IE plate is thinner than the stock plate when it’s placed between the strut bearing and the fender, will lower the car a few mm. l’m using Eibach pro springs, everything is good height-wise.

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Thanks so much. I am definitely going to have to add some longer studs as I am also putting a brace above which requires an additional quarter inch of stud up top.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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32 minutes ago, sam1904 said:

Thanks so much. I am definitely going to have to add some longer studs as I am also putting a brace above which requires an additional quarter inch of stud up top.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

If you use the fixed camber plates you won’t need longer studs. I’m using them with a brace and have plenty of thread, the longer threads go up. 

99ED0E6B-6184-4A99-9362-EDD44D299B37.jpeg

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you have the plate upside down in your pics, the short bolts go through the top strut mount (pointing down), the long bolts go up into the engine bay

 

They should be long enough for a strut bar.

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2 hours ago, Mike G said:

If the nose looks lower than the rear go to a thinner spring pad in the back.

I doubt you'll have this problem though, most 2002s I've seen tend to have a bit of a saggy ass compared to the front and generally benefit from thicker rear spacers to get rid of the German Shepard stance (mine included).

OT, but @Mike G +10 for painting your valve cover though! I always love me some extra color in the engine bay.  Looks Taiga-ish, albeit on a Mint car, yes?  I think I went with Mopar's 'Grabber Green' as the closest to Mint I could find for my intake manifold.

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2 hours ago, sam1904 said:

IMG_4806.jpg

 

25 minutes ago, xr4tic said:

They should be long enough for a strut bar.

 

Hmm, strut bar vs stock air cleaner...

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Easy choice for me.  The strut brace I bought was an easy sell too.  A lot of people really like them.  I really really like my air cleaner.

 

I've gone back and forth with long and short studs in my mounts.  Medium-long ones are in them now. 

 

I have the aluminum spacers back in, on top of some H&R springs and three dot rear pads.  It is sitting level at the rockers, which I thought was ideal; but   now   I   hear   a little high in the rear might be better after all.

 

I figure lowering springs with spacers installed puts me right around stock height (minus spacers).

I may shim the rear up a bit... when I feel like it.

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FYI at least the '69 US cars had the front suspension spacer, and I think the '68s did too.  Anyone on the board have a '68 with evidence of the front spacers?  That would be original long stud upper strut bearings, or the old spacers in a dark corner of the trunk.

 

mike

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Thanks all. You are correct that the studs are long enough!


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13 hours ago, '76mintgrün'02 said:

 I   hear   a little high in the rear might be better after all.

 

Try to achieve a 1" higher rear measured between the two jack points, or 1 Degree of rake.

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New issue - with IE Stage 1 springs and Koni struts the springs are loose enough to move around...

After doing some reading I guess this is a common issue. I plan on:

  1. Putting a bead of silicone between the spring perches and metal to hold them in place
  2. Drilling a small hole in each metal 'receiver' at the end of the spring.
  3. Putting a zip tie through the hole and around the last coil to stop it moving too far out of position (metal zip tie)

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