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Cold Start Wiring Harness

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Today I finished fabricating a cold start wiring harness for my '74 tii.  It was quite an enjoyable and satisfying project.  The most interesting and educational part was learning how to crimp open-barrel connector pins.  I had to buy a special crimping tool (mandatory for this job: $100) and learn how to crimp open-barrel pins (wasted many pins in the learning process).  I used Ant's Wheeler Dealer technique of layout and fabrication (see WD rebuild of a 510 Datsun [Google]).  I installed the harness and it worked.  Go figure.    

 

I fully realize you many FAQ experts in FAQ Land have done this project many times, more efficiently, and with better results; however, first time for me, and I enjoyed it immensely.

 

Larry

 

Photos:  old harness; finished harness; layouts WD layouts (old and new); assembly; crimping masterpieces; Land of Confusion; O'Reilly alternator post boots on temp and thermo time switches (a long way from OEM; best I could find)

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It looks like you used new black sleeves. What was your source? And diameters? Did you have cracked sleeves in the cold start harness? I’m starting to refurbish my 73tii’s harnesses. 

Dan

 

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Dan,

     The old harness was functioning well; however, it was looking shoddy and displayed a few spots of bare wire.  In addition, it looked like a fun project.

     The old sleeves were not in good condition:  hard, cracked, and brittle -- so much so, I "cracked" them off.  I purchased the new sleeves from Einspritz here on FAQ.  Two sizes:  one holds four wires nice and snuggly, and one holds two wires loosely (__?__mm and _?__mm flattened width, respectively).  I will measure the widths today and post results.  As you probably already know, these sleeves are not heat-shrinkable. 

Larry

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Looking good, I would probably take the time to solder the wires to the crimp on connectors since you have it all so nice and new. Belt and suspenders.

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Thanks, 7502.

Yes, indeed.  You are correct.  A good idea and extremely easy to do.  I soldered the ground eye crimped terminal, then forgot to solder the other 13 connections.  I should have done so.  I hate when that happens.

Larry

 

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5 hours ago, 7502 said:

Looking good, I would probably take the time to solder the wires to the crimp on connectors since you have it all so nice and new. Belt and suspenders.

 

If crimps are completed properly then there is no benefit in soldering them. The solder, as it wicks into the wire strands, actually cause a hard spot and increases  the chances of a fatigue failure of the wire outside of the crimp. 

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ibid

 

That's why you spent so much on those fancy crimp pliers that crimp the insulation too. That relieves the stress on the conductor, and allows the wire to bend freely without breaking the strands.

 

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Perhaps the only harness terminal that does not move at all and is OK to solder is the only one I soldered:  the ground eye terminal screwed to the firewall.  It is so snug in place it probably will not move until the car goes to the crusher.

 

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4 hours ago, Einspritz said:

That's why you spent so much on those fancy crimp pliers that crimp the insulation too.

 

😲

 

Where and what is this tool?

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The tool is an (automotive) terminal crimping tool.  You can purchase individual tools with jaws/inserts which crimp one type of terminal or kits (as shown below) which include inserts to crimp several types to terminals.  Do some research in the internet and check Google videos re: its capabilities and how to use this type of tool.  I purchased the one below on Ebay (~$93) and like it.

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/S-G-Tool-Aid-18980-Master-Ratcheting-Terminal-Crimper-Set-/191305543811

 

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I bought that kit directly from the manufacturer..tool aid.

 

The value in that set is that it includes the spark plug wire die whereas the others do not.

 

So, support your local tool manufacturer.

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+1 to soldering.  40 years from now, and perhaps even sooner, IMHO and in deference to my Australian beer-drinking pal, a secure electrical flow path will be of greater importance than considerations of fatigue failure.

 

Cheers,

 

Carl

 

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