deschodt

The one time my wife borrows the 2002

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(edited)

She suffers total hydraulics failure. At the worst intersection in town. I mean that literally, absolute messiest busiest place, middle lane, bam... Clutch pedal to the floor, brake warning light, though brakes still worked... Fluid dripping under, brake fluid reservoir is low but not empty.... 

I went to retrieve it, I'd have driven it home w/o the clutch but given the mega traffic, I wasn't sure how many stops would be required and how much abuse starting in first gear would cause to get to my house... So I got it towed, after all that's why i have AAA -  first time in 11y of ownership. She looks good on a flatbed too, except that bumper end I need to tweak !  

IMG_8693s.JPG

Edited by deschodt
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Any breakdown without injury or paint damage is merely an inconvenience. Happy to hear it wasn't worse.

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Ugh! That is the WORST! Glad no one was hurt - including your pretty orange baby!

 

FYI: I've experienced a similar failure on two different 2002s over the last 30-somethingsomethinggrumblegrumble years. The rod that connects the clutch pedal to the master cylinder can break in half - naturally in the worst intersection on the worst day possible. 

 

Whenever I replace a clutch master cylinder, I ALWAYS keep the old push rod as a spare, since the new cylinders come with one, and purchasing the rod by itself is a ridiculously spendy event.

 

Spare parts like this fit within my hoarding guidelines of a) it's not greasy b) it's not heavy c) it doesn't take up a bunch of space and d) it doesn't smell bad. 

 

Here's an illustration showing where / how they break. Different rods have the taper in different places (depending on model BMW but you get the general idea)...presumably to shear off for safety in the case of an accident (?) ...but it introduces a natural failure point after a few decades of use. And check those nylon/plastic top hat bushings once in a while! Always use a new lock nut on the bolt that passes through them, too. Cheap insurance!

Part number on bushings: 35 31 4 640 116 ($1.52 ea.)

Part number for M10 lock nut: 07 12 9 964 672 ($1.62 for Genuine BMW but commonly available anywhere)

 

 

master cylinder rod.jpeg

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9 minutes ago, wegweiser said:

 

Here's an illustration

 

 

Did you draw that?

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1 minute ago, Jimmy said:

 

Did you draw that?

Yep. I even have a degree in Fine Arts (illustration)....which is why I'm a BMW mechanic and sell parts, to pay my rent. :D

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3 minutes ago, wegweiser said:

Yep. I even have a degree in Fine Arts (illustration)....which is why I'm a BMW mechanic and sell parts, to pay my rent. :D

 

 

You could do a skitz von bimmerhead cartoon!

 

:D

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(edited)
4 minutes ago, ray_ said:

 

 

You could do a skitz von bimmerhead cartoon!

 

:D

I occasionally write for "Roundel" but Satch needs to pay me more, if I'm going to do THOSE too! ;)

 

Edited by wegweiser
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2 minutes ago, wegweiser said:

Yep. I even have a degree in Fine Arts (illustration)....which is why I'm a BMW mechanic and sell parts, to pay my rent. :D

 

I'm really impressed. Do you ever do commission work? 

 

Also, a John Muir-style (How To Keep Your Volkswagen Alive) book for the 02 using your artwork would be amazing.

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In the interest of accuracy (I had drawn that previous thing from memory) I have stumbled upon my spare 2002 push-rod showing the more accurate location of failure. :D

 

Commission work? Ha! *maybe*? 

master push rod.jpg

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(edited)

Paul, your drawing is really cool, I dig that style. I wish I could draw at all, let alone like you. 

 

Thanks for your incredibly helpful post, although I'll freely admit that once I had the car delivered to a shop on a fltbed, I'm not going to do that myself anymore. I would have, had I managed to get home but with limited brakes, a steep hill and that traffic, I did not risk it.... 

 

Curious, a breakage of this part would explain the "dead fish" floppy pedal, but would that break explain the loss of 1" of brake fluid on the reservoir and dripping hydraulic fluid on the floor ?  (I'm clearly not familiar with the clutch MC, though i did replace a pipe there once...) I sense a hydraulic circuit inspection / revision in my future.

 

Anyway, my wife has an amusing record... 20y ago my 356 died near the GGBridge and she was at the wheel  (starter)... Later my Alfa GTV died and she was driving (electrical contact, I fixed that one before AAA showed up). Now the Bimmer mid town, blocking buses and 3 lanes of traffic (no pressure then!)... She's just not lucky with old cars. The 02 has been rock solid for me for over a decade. No biggie...

Edited by deschodt

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If Deschodt's car peed hydraulic fluid all over the ground, chances are good that it could be a slave cylinder failure--or even the hose that connects the two.  If it was the clutch M/C, don't forget to get every last molecule of brake fluid out of the pedal box, the clean with solvent (and repaint while you're at it).  Otherwise you'll end up with a Swiss Cheese pedal box (ask me how I learned this!)

 

Now you know why the takeoff nipple that supplies hydraulic fluid to the clutch is an inch or so off the bottom of the fluid reservoir.  That's why you still have brakes.

 

Glad no one was hurt/no sheet metal was dinged.

 

mike

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Sorry to muddy the waters. My post was simply mentioning that there is ANOTHER type of failure that can affect the driver's ability to engage / disengage the clutch. 

 

When I worked for Maximillian Importing back in the early 1990s, I made a lot of illustrations that I could fax to customers, to better explain parts placement / installation. I plan on reviving that part of my brain now that I;m working with them again. 

 

I haven't really draw'd in years, til this week!

 

Here's one from about 20 years ago... stay tuned for many more and many new ones in the coming months!

ventglass.jpeg

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9 minutes ago, mike said:

If Deschodt's car peed hydraulic fluid all over the ground, chances are good that it could be a slave cylinder failure--or even the hose that connects the two.  If it was the clutch M/C, don't forget to get every last molecule of brake fluid out of the pedal box, the clean with solvent (and repaint while you're at it).  Otherwise you'll end up with a Swiss Cheese pedal box (ask me how I learned this!)

 

Now you know why the takeoff nipple that supplies hydraulic fluid to the clutch is an inch or so off the bottom of the fluid reservoir.  That's why you still have brakes.

 

mike

 

Thanks Mike, that was my first guess too. A pipe or the slave cylinder. Hard to see with traffic around but mucho fluid on the ground...  I’ll report later! 

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Total hydraulic failure would have been no brakes.

 

Your clutch hydraulics peed out.  The brakes still were fine, as they have

a reserve for just this sort of thing.  Had you filled it and tried it, there's a pretty

good chance you'd have been able to get some clutch function.  It IS pretty disconcerting

to have the clutch self- engage, though...

 

And Mike, I gotta disagree here- for brake fluid, water- based cleaner is

best, as brake fluid is water soluble.  Solvents may or may not work,

but soap and water is always a winner.

 

Ok, I'll stop now

 

t

hee

 

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Man, sorry to hear that it happened when wife borrowed it. Can’t imagine the sheer terror in her when it happened in the middle of a busy intersection. Glad you didn’t attempt to drive it back without a working clutch engagement. That can’t be good for a transmission, any transmission regardless of how good a driver you are. 

Similar thing happened to me and it was the slave cylinder. All the best.

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