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flagoworld

Post windshield removal cleanup

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(edited)

I did a thing... Came out really easily with the help of a blade. Now I am looking for recommendations on cleaning up the leftover tar-like adhesive and some other things:

 

  • Best way to remove all the schmoo from the edges of the glass?
  • How important is prep before putting the new seal in? Does it need to be completely smooth and free of inconsistencies?
  • Does it matter how much I scratch at the paint when removing the leftover tar? Should i sand it down consistently all over and paint back over it or something?
  • There's some rust along the top where I'm guessing some water got trapped. I'll want to really clean that up and paint over it thoroughly, I'm guessing?
  • When refitting the new seal, is there some kind of adhesive I am supposed to use?

 

 

windshield.jpg

Edited by flagoworld

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2 minutes ago, flagoworld said:
  • How important is prep before putting the new seal in? Does it need to be completely smooth and free of inconsistencies?

ideally yes, the rubber (if supple) can seal well on a slightly uneven surface but you will get better results if it’s all smooth and even

  • Does it matter how much I scratch at the paint when removing the leftover tar? Should i sand it down consistently all over and paint back over it or something?

I doesn’t matter as long as you don’t break the film down to a lower level. It sounds from your next bullet point that you need to do some painting anyway. 

  • There's some rust along the top where I'm getting some water got trapped. I'll want to really clean that up and paint over it thoroughly, I'm guessing?

Use something abrasive, I like the Rolloc / Stripit discs on a angle grinder for this. Take it down to shiny bare steel. I would then mask off the opening and the surrounding bodywork and spray some 2 part epoxy primer on it to seal. Hopefully the hard edge will be under the rubber and therefore hidden. If the damage goes above the rubber then you will need to do a better job in matching in the repair with the surrounding paintwork. This may be a professional job. If you don’t have any spray equipment then still try and use 2K epoxy but brush it on (be prepared that this may not be the prettiest painting you have ever done but it should seal things up well. 

  • When refitting the new seal, is there some kind of adhesive I am supposed to use?

In theory, with a new factory rubber, it shouldn’t need an additional sealant  In practice,  it’s not a bad idea to fit the screen and then insert the nozzle of the specialist windshield sealant under the lip with the body and squeeze a small bead in all the way around. When the rubber is released it will distribute it under the seal. I wouldn’t bother with the lip to the glass unless you find you have a leak afterwards.   

 

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Awesome thanks! So when you say specialist windshield sealant... Is there a certain kind you are referring to or will any stuff work? Well... surely any stuff for that purpose will work, but if you are referring to a superior substance... 

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Taking the windshield out is the easy part. I just put my windshields back in after paint. I would clean up and paint or treat your surfaces as best you can. It's unlikely they will see the light of day again in your lifetime.

 

My son and I put the windshields back in. There is a Tech Article "How to". It's a two person job, so I'd have someone help who has done it before. And the Tech Article suggests caulking. I did.

 

Then there's the lock strip. Holy bejesus that thing gave me a hard time. Use a LOT of lube as you go.  A LOT! I still have to do the rear lock strip when I get back from vacation and I'm not looking forward to that either. I'd get somebody to help with that as well.

 

BTW, OEM seals aren't cheap. Good luck.

 

Nick

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-  Clean off old rubber sealant with "contact cement" thinner or Toluene, available at most hardware stores.  Won't effect cured paint.

 

-   Re-finish rusty areas as best you can.

 

-   My recommendation is to use a professional installer to install your glass and lockstrip.  They are very fast and not expensive.  It's worth the money to save aggravation and potential mistakes leading to damage.  Plus, they have suction handles to tweak the position of the glass.

 

-   ONLY use OEM seals.

 

-   My installer showed me the way...lockstrip inserted BEFORE installing glass.  His reasoning "BMW wouldn't do two jobs when they could do the installation in one job."  Putting the lock strip in after is difficult and problematic.   Service manual shows the combined glass and lockstrip installation.  Funny, they say install separately on the Touring.  Not sure why.

 

-   IMHO, no sealant required.  If everything is clean and smooth the rubber "gasket" will act as a seal.  Use sealant if you'd like. 

 

 

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9 hours ago, PaulTWinterton said:

-  Clean off old rubber sealant with "contact cement" thinner or Toluene, available at most hardware stores.  Won't effect cured paint.

 

-   Re-finish rusty areas as best you can.

 

-   My recommendation is to use a professional installer to install your glass and lockstrip.  They are very fast and not expensive.  It's worth the money to save aggravation and potential mistakes leading to damage.  Plus, they have suction handles to tweak the position of the glass.

 

-   ONLY use OEM seals.

 

-   My installer showed me the way...lockstrip inserted BEFORE installing glass.  His reasoning "BMW wouldn't do two jobs when they could do the installation in one job."  Putting the lock strip in after is difficult and problematic.   Service manual shows the combined glass and lockstrip installation.  Funny, they say install separately on the Touring.  Not sure why.

 

-   IMHO, no sealant required.  If everything is clean and smooth the rubber "gasket" will act as a seal.  Use sealant if you'd like. 

 

 

 

Interesting bit about putting the lock strip in first. I will try that. Hopefully I don't break it :):):)

 

 

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29 minutes ago, flagoworld said:

 

Interesting bit about putting the lock strip in first. I will try that. Hopefully I don't break it

 

 

 

I tried this after reading it in the shop manual but I had no luck and resorted to running it in afterwards. This was likely to be because my new lock strip was still twisted from being supplied coiled up.

 

After being installed for a number of years, I suspect that I would have more luck with that approach now as it has taken on the correct shape and wouldn’t fight as much at the same time you are wrestling with the rubber.  If you have a new strip, get it good and warm to avoid this (as previously stated). 

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1 hour ago, Simeon said:

likely to be because my new lock strip was still twisted from being supplied coiled up.

 

Good point.  Made me remember. The installer put the strip in a pan of hot hot water to straighten it.

 

While it was heating he applied the gasket around the windshield on a glass stand.  Then he laid in the lock strip starting at the bottom (center) and fed it around the gasket.  Next he wrapped the "pull cord" around the outside of the gasket.

 

He and a partner positioned the entire unit into position.  With his partner pulling the cord inside the car he coached from the front to guide the gasket into position inside the car. There's the magic.

 

Once the gasket was properly in place, he and his partner nudged the windshield sideways to center it perfectly.

 

Last step, the cosmetic cover over the lock strip ends.

 

Start to finish 20 minutes.  That's why I love professionals. 

 

But I have a heap of respect for DIY warriors. Go for it!

 

 

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Tried really hard to get the window installed this weekend. Could not get the window and rubber to seat far enough for the rip cord to pull it over the metal seam just before the corners. It would pull over the seams on most of the horizontal and vertical flat, but around the corners it's tough! I think I don't have the technique right. Debating whether to pay someone to come do it or keep trying. Pretty annoying so far. :(

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You need to insert the screen as low down into the seal and the seal over the panel lip as low as you can and then apply pressure to the top of the screen to push the top into position. Someone on here used a ratcheting strap around the pillars might not work so well on the rear screen or a large suction cup from the inside to pull the screen inwards while you pull the cord out to get the lip over. A double wrap of string around the screen gives you two bites at the cherry as well. I think I remember pressing from the outside while pulling the cord out by leaning in the rear quarter windows (obviously with no glass in place). 

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So the glass should be basically completely seated in place before pulling the rip cord to bring the rubber lip around the seal? That may be my issue then, because i thought the glass seated into place as the rip cord was pulled. So the top was basically sticking out an inch while doing this. I may have been a little too gingerly with my application of pressure. I'll try to put a little more umph... that is, if I'm understanding you correctly.

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The bottom is seared into position and you need to be pushing the top as hard as you can (without breaking it!) so that the top is as close as possible. If your cord is wound so that it starts coming out from the centre bottom, then this first run up until about the 1st third up the screen should almost be in its correct position and the cord just pulls the inner lip over the frame. As the pressure is applied at the top it should allow the screen to pivot closer to the frame as the seal is pulled over the frame from the bottom of the sides. 

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(edited)

Pulling the rope pulls the gasket lip into the interior of the opening.

 

 

Edited by John_in_VA

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