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Strange old trim damage. Theories?

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The attached picture is from the driver’s side B pillar. The weird scratches have been there forever, they came with the car. I’m curious as to what you guys think might have caused them. It doesn’t look like it’s from doors bumping into it. I suspect it’s from a theft attempt back in the day. It has no bearing on the car, really, just an interesting historical puzzle. 

3D482BA3-ECE7-4C66-A504-660FA33C2DCB.jpeg

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1)  Seat belt buckle flailing around while driver unbuckles with the door open.

 

2) Window mis-aligned contacting the trim.  This seems to happen more on the upper edge.

 

3) Coat hanger marks from a previous auto theft (or lock out) attempt, although inserting the coat hanger from the TOP to pull up on the door release handle would most likely work better.

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(edited)
2 hours ago, andyleonard said:

Keys locked in car.

 

+1

 

I don’t have the ‘76 around, but I think this piece of trim has noticeable damage on my car as well. I chose to leave it as is!

 

Regards,

 

Steven

 

 

0EEF8884-679E-48D8-B36B-63F56331809B.jpeg

Edited by Conserv

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Sharp rings or someone who leans on the B pillar with keys in hand as they get in?

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Rear seat passengers trying to claw their way out, convinced that they are surely going to die when the little car careens off a cliff.

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  • Haha 2

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2 hours ago, jgerock said:

1)  Seat belt buckle flailing around while driver unbuckles with the door open.

 

2) Window mis-aligned contacting the trim.  This seems to happen more on the upper edge.

 

3) Coat hanger marks from a previous auto theft (or lock out) attempt, although inserting the coat hanger from the TOP to pull up on the door release handle would most likely work better.

jgerock nailed it. Poorly aligned door glass will do this, as will seatbelt clip. Worn plastic/nylon parts inside the door is the usual culprit. Can often be adjusted to compensate for this, since the plastic parts are NLA, I believe.

 

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Too irregular for misalignment..

 

I vote dawg.  Or pet ferret.

 

t

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Rear seat passengers trying to claw their way out, convinced that they are surely going to die when the little car careens off a cliff.
SteveJ nailed it.

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What? None of you have tried to open a locked door with a coat hanger??

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(edited)
10 hours ago, SteveJ said:

Rear seat passengers trying to claw their way out, convinced that they are surely going to die when the little car careens off a cliff.

All of the suggestions made in this thread are plausible, but hardly complete.  Consider how many times the window has been left down to allow cabin access for loading and unloading of:  packages, tools, tables, welding tanks, ski equipment, medical supplies, construction equipment, outboard motors, floor tiles, drive line parts, parachute, landing gear or other items better suited for a truck bed.  How about any front and rear seat removal and re-installation?  Has someone reached through the window area to turn the ignition key, unlock the steering, adjust the radio, move a chair back, move gear shift or grab a baby?  Ever clean the inside glass, especially the easily accessed rear glass?  Or try to ensure that a rear quarter window hasp is actually in the closed position?    Add a rhinestone, buckle, ring, squeegee or zipper and voila - instant character.

 

While the A pillar generally gets the shoulder treatment when pushing the car forward, the B pillar is clearly the choice of hands (and items they might carry or wear)  when pushing the vehicle rearward.

Edited by Roland
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Quote

welding tanks

 

Guilty.  The o2 tank is too tall to fit in the trunk safely.

 

The only problem with the unlock theory is that you can't unlock

a 2002 that way- no nub on the top to pull on.  You go for the

doorhandle instead, and it's not there.

 

 

But they're too regular for everyday life.  The o2 bottle leaves a skudge, my keys leave

small scratches, the ferret chews very regular patterns, and the seatbelt makes dings.

 

I reassess- a very dumb car thief.

 

t

 

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My '73 has a few of those marks, but a little higher up, and I'm pretty sure of the origin (they're actually on both sides).  Previous owner made several cross country (CA to NC) in the car--with wife and two kids.  They had a trunk rack and a roof rack, and I think the marks were from a loose tiedown strap with a metal buckle.  At highway speeds it wouldn't take long for the noise to make itself known inside the car (even with two kids in the back) but the damage had been done.   I consider it just part of the car's patina.  

 

mike

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