BimmerBouk

multiple wheel bearing fail front

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Hello dear 02friends,  I am looking for some hints.

 

My 02 failed MOT on the front wheel bearing on the right side. Therefore I replaced both hubs with new bearings. After the fix the right side was ok, but now the left side immediately made soft rumbling noise, so a fail on the other side. Replaced that bearing again, with a new bearing, but now the profi workshop replaced it with the same type of bearing... fail again, immediately made a soft rumbling noise.

 

Statistically I think it is almost impossible that I was supplied twice with wheel bearings which where not good from the beginning (remember I fixed the right side with the same type of bearing)

 

I am really puzzeled. Please help, I need some tips what to look for. Is it maybe possible something is wrong with the hub? Could it be the shaft? Both backing plate and brake shoes where not replaced when hearing the rumbling noise.

 

Anyone has some clues? Thanks!

 

Best regards,

Bouke

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what year is your car - very early struts had smaller inner bearings (although if it's the car in your sig then probably not as you've got a long rear bumper, but anything can happen over the years)

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What criteria does MOT use to asses if a bearing has failed?

 

In my opinion, bearing "failure" cannot be assessed by sound alone, you must look at the bearing and race to determine that.

 

After replacing the bearing races, the proper replacement of front bearings is to pack each bearing with grease, fill the cover cap with grease, and add 35 grams of grease into the hub, generally toward the "outside" where the bearings sit.

 

Install big bearing, then seal, then pack the space between the bearing and the seal with grease, with a little going into the groove of the seal. Install the hub and outer (small) bearing. Insert the washer and nut and tighten to 1.0 mkp / 7.2 lb. ft. Then back off 1/3 turn and check that the washer can be moved back and forth by a large screwdriver....with resistance. The runout should be about 0.006" if you can measure that.

 

The grease, by the way should have a recommended drop point of 500 deg. F / 260 deg. C. On a street car, I have never seen that the hub has ever reached that temperature where the grease "melts".

 

HTH

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2 hours ago, NickVyse said:

what year is your car - very early struts had smaller inner bearings (although if it's the car in your sig then probably not as you've got a long rear bumper, but anything can happen over the years)

 

+1 ... I had a car arrive with wobbly wheel bearings as you describe, was a result of what @NickVyse describes. -KB

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8 hours ago, BimmerBouk said:

My 02 failed MOT on the front wheel bearing on the right side. Therefore I replaced both hubs with new bearings. After the fix the right side was ok, but now the left side immediately made soft rumbling noise, so a fail on the other side. Replaced that bearing again, with a new bearing, but now the profi workshop replaced it with the same type of bearing... fail again, immediately made a soft rumbling noise.

 

I am really puzzeled. Please help, I need some tips what to look for. Is it maybe possible something is wrong with the hub? Could it be the shaft? Both backing plate and brake shoes where not replaced when hearing the rumbling noise.

 

Anyone has some clues? Thanks!

You do not offer any salient details regarding the MOT wheel bearing failure.  Were they found to be worn, or perhaps not snug?  In either scenario, a quick shake of the wheel would likely have indicated a problem.  The sound would likely have been a symptom of secondary importance, unless it was very loud.  This might also suggest the bearing was dry or poorly lubricated.  One also suspects that failing wheel bearings could be indicated by vibration transmitted though the steering and possibly even brakes.

 

It is improbable but not impossible for the so-called new replacement bearings to have been defective when purchased, but it would seem that you could have easily examined them for anything unusual prior to installation.   This also includes examining the bearings for improper handling, i.e., a dented cage, which can easily occur from dropping.  That leaves installation as the more likely culprit.

 

First, did you replace the bearing as a unit with the race that came with it?  Was the race properly seated?  Using a race that was used with the old bearing could easily account for premature bearing failure as could a race that was not properly seated in the rotor hub.

 

Second, not knowing anything about the replacement bearings, did you install them directly from the plastic or waxed/greased paper, or did you clean them and carefully repack them with appropriate wheel bearing grease?  If, for example, you installed a new wheel bearing without proper lubrication, it is destined to premature failure.  SImilarly, if you did not thoroughly remove the old bearing grease and it was contaminated with debris from the old bearings, same result.

 

Bearings that are either too loose or too tight can suffer premature wear, even with the best grease and bearing materials since this can result in uneven and overstressed bearing loads beyond the bearing's design parameters.  It may be uncommon but bearings that have seen heavy use when examined closely can show signs of "bluing" indicating excessive friction/heat.   Another poster stated never having observed temperatures reached on a street car's hub and bearing that would reach the 500 degree F melting point of the recommended grease.  However, that presupposes that everything was installed correctly and functioning under normal circumstances.  If the bearings are too loose or too tight, or a caliper is dragging, or the grease has been allowed to degrade or become subject to contamination, overheating can and will occur.

 

 

IMG_5566-1024x768.jpg

 

 

760-Dented-Cage.jpgpc010042.jpg

 

 

 

old-bearing.jpg

 

 

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Perhaps you forgot to grease bearings before installing 

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3 hours ago, avoirdupois said:

That leaves installation as the more likely culprit.

When I worked as an engineer for the navy in nuclear submarine overhaul/refueling, I read a report on bearing failure and the leading cause was dirt contaminated grease!  Dirty hands are a big source of dirt.

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Hello Friends, thank you for all the leads and answers. Still I am puzzeled, i did the installation according to the books, and with new and enough grease and wearing plastic gloves while pre greasing the bearings. 

 

I will try to swap the hubs to see if that gives some clues. Could a hub failure be the source?

 

Other thing is I did not rotate the wheel slightly with torqing, maybe that could be a problem?

 

The slight noise which it makes is a failure for MOT in the Netherlands, even without play... or I just bumped in the wrong workshop...

 

I will try tomorrow to find some answers based on all your answers. 

 

Thanks people! Any idea still welcome 

 

 

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22 hours ago, NickVyse said:

what year is your car - very early struts had smaller inner bearings (although if it's the car in your sig then probably not as you've got a long rear bumper, but anything can happen over the years)

 

1972, the bearings are the correct type for my car, thank you!

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6 hours ago, BimmerBouk said:

i did the installation according to the books, and with new and enough grease and wearing plastic gloves while pre greasing the bearings. 

 

I will try to swap the hubs to see if that gives some clues. Could a hub failure be the source?

 

Other thing is I did not rotate the wheel slightly with torqing, maybe that could be a problem?

 

The slight noise which it makes is a failure for MOT in the Netherlands, even without play... or I just bumped in the wrong workshop...

 

I suspect that only a small minority used plastic gloves for grease packing, let alone general mechanical operations when these cars were new or when the manuals were first drafted.🤨 

 

I tend to think that the plastic gloves function more to protect your hands than to minimize cross-contamination.  In fact,some might argue that vinyl/latex gloves might limit your tactile sense making it easy to miss extraneous grit, even in new grease.  (I do not think this is related to your problems, but it may be worth considering.) 

 

You mention following "the book," which is generally a good thing.  However, whatever book you are using, may not spell out each and every mundane step, or it may take certain steps for granted.  When you replaced the "old" grease, is it possible that you failed to remove all of it from both the spindle and the hub?  Simply wiping old partially-liquified grease from inside the hub may not be as effective as flushing it out with parts cleaning solution.  That also raises another question, did you remove, clean and replace both the inner and outer bearings, and the grease seal - or just the outside bearings?  (Naturally, if somehow the the hubs are ever submerged in salty Zuiderzee runoff,or your car is used to ford rivers, grease suitable for that purpose should be employed.)

 

At this point, you might consider posting some photos of the replaced bearings, with their matching races, that you suspect "failed."  It might be interesting if you had every thing clean and dry and rotated each assembly to determine whether the action is smooth and uniform or rough and uneven.

 

As a parting thought, wheel bearing "noise," as you characterize it, might not be bearing noise.  If you replace pads on either an unturned or poorly surfaced brake rotor, this might result in a growling noise.  Loose pads, due to any number of factors, including failed or poorly installed retainers, could result in noise, especially in conjunction with slightly loose lug nuts or even loose wheel bearings.  And then there is the friction material itself .  .  .  etc.

 

 

 

1E7B62E7-15C9-412F-8EED-B3A3ED41C600.jpe

 

nautilus-4.jpg

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