73tiiDavidPA

Venting Exhaust Out of Garage ?

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First off, I know nothing about this, other then you shouldn't run your car inside.  I've also seen / been at plenty of shops that have various methods of attaching hoses to exhaust pipes and venting them to outside the shop (big dealer type places).  

 

Twice now I've run the tii through the warm up phase (@10 minutes) while inside the garage, garage door open.  My wife of course would like it if I didn't kill myself in the garage, as would I.  I attempted some very light / silver flexible duct hosing from the big box store.  All that did was move around like a snake and eventually blow off the exhaust end.  Should I be looking for heavier hosing?  Should I not be worrying about it for short 10 minute cycles with the door wide open?  For information, my garage is 24 x 36, 3 bay with a walk up attic, 3 large 9 x 10 foot doors.  Anyone out there find good hosing to fit over the exhaust pipe / or have other solutions?  

 

to give folks an idea about how much ventilation there is from an open door (when I'm working on the car its nose in, exhaust out towards the door)1134095840_2013Garagewithcars4.JPG.2cf9c54f0476b479aadf364a2a83bd83.JPG    

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Parking nose in shouldn't be an issue in my opinion. But I might be brain damaged.  Do you have a door out the back you could open and maybe run a box fan to help move the air?

I like the Citroen (if that's what it is). 

 

A section of that black correlated plastic drain hose may do the job. It's heavy enough not to move around.  I was thinking of something like thinking that it might quiet down the exhaust a bit in my congested alley.

 

 

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I've plugged gutter downspout onto mine, to get it out of the open carport. 

 

All you really need do is to move it out away from the opening, which is easy if the door is open.  If you are trying to snake it under the closed door, you'd need tight fitting flex, or some ninety degree fittings for the hard pipe. 

 

An added bonus is that the pipe makes it a little quieter, which the neighbors appreciate, when you are plotting your advance curve and such.

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I have a very similar, stand alone garage to yours with an apartment upstairs. I have CO detectors in both the garage and the apartment. You should too. I have the ones that show CO peak levels etc.

 

FWIW I routinely set off the garage detector by simply starting the cars and backing them out. Admittedly the building is well insulated with spray foam, but still....

 

I can't imagine the level of CO you're accumulating while warming up the Tii for 10 minutes! Death awaits. 

 

Get a detector or two and then worry about venting the exhaust. Personally, I wouldn't rig anything up. Back them out while they're warming up.

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Wish I had a garage like that!    Do you have room to install a ceiling fan in the garage?   Or have any windows in the back wall to help circulate the air inside?  I suggest pointing the rear end out and backing (rolling) it so the exhaust is past the door.

 

I have to pull the cars front-end first to limit the amount of exhaust captured by my (townhouse) garage.  A slight vacuum inside the house will pull vapors from the basement door when it is opened.  I installed a digital CO alarm inside the house 6 steps up from the basement to a landing.  If I back one car in, there is a greater chance the CO alarm will go off.

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First I wish I had the same problem.......what a great space for your toys.  

 

I am planing to  tackle the same issue once I get my car back. My garage is much smaller so I will be able to move a larger volume of air providing I can get a fan that will accomplish that.  I think I will need  to be in the 200 -300 cubic feet p/m range to be effective to draw and exhaust any gases or moisture in the air......I live on the wet coast , so it is more for the moisture problem as the car shares the space with the family car.

 

I currently have a 6" hard pipe vented thru my attic and roof, I simply have to find the proper fan and cut the opening in my ceiling and make the necessary  mechanical connections to complete it.

 

In your case and because of the volume of air you will need to move, indirect venting will not be that efficient.  IMO, you will need a large volume CFPM fan to do that. That said,  I would think you will need a direct system that is somehow fan assisted to draw the gasses from the tailpipe and push them out the garage effectively, if there is any distance involved.  A heavy magnet attached to the a metal collector would also ensure that it stayed secured.  As mentioned earlier, a flexible , heavy gauge pipe slipped under the door direct from the tail pipe would also work I guess but  slightly more obtrusive , not to mention it would certainly avoid cutting a hole in your doors.

 

A couple of other possibilities....you could fabricate a smaller door panel with the proper size fitting and place it in the door opening and  close the door resting on the fabricated panel. Not that appealing perhaps from the street but a decent fix if you want to keep out the cold air. Or,  you could vent it out the rear wall but likely to much work given the space looks finished.

 

A big + for the  02 sensors too

 

That's my 2 cents worth.....let us know what you come up with. 

 

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I just put a cheap garage sale box fan about 6" from the exhaust outlet and run it on high  pointing out the door when the car is running this is of course only going to work with the car close to the door and parked nose in. Also experience has shown a post it note saying FAN on the steering wheel will greatly improve fan life😫

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2 hours ago, 7502 said:

I like the Citroen (if that's what it is). 

 

thanks, yes, a '66 DS21 (she's getting the hydraulic power steering rack rebuilt right now ($$$))

 

2 hours ago, 7502 said:

Do you have a door out the back you could open and maybe run a box fan to help move the air?

 

2 hours ago, jgerock said:

Do you have room to install a ceiling fan in the garage?   Or have any windows in the back wall to help circulate the air inside? 

 

no door in back, just 3 windows high up on both sides.  The ceiling is 12', so I have plenty of room for a fan, but hesitate at this moment because the overall grand plan is to get a 12' lift and I don't know which bay I would put it in.  So until I figure out where the lift goes, I'm holding off on ceiling fans.  

 

I did get the garage insulated and an AC / heat pump put in last year.  Its not duct'd to the nines, only one large duct upstairs and one downstairs.  The guy who quoted fully ducting the garage wanted an extra $1,500.  For my purposes, a single huge duct on each level works OK (I don't live out there).  

 

2 hours ago, NYNick said:

I have CO detectors in both the garage and the apartment. You should too. I have the ones that show CO peak levels etc.

 

Actually a great suggestion.  I (in my stupidity) never really thought of that.  I'll take a peak online and at the big box store.  

 

2 hours ago, NYNick said:

Get a detector or two and then worry about venting the exhaust. Personally, I wouldn't rig anything up. Back them out while they're warming up.

 

Detector, check, will get.  Not a fan of having the doors open.  In SC its either hot like Hades, and I want the AC, or it the mosquitoes will kill (year round) outside.  

 

43 minutes ago, joysterm said:

I would think you will need a direct system that is somehow fan assisted to draw the gasses from the tailpipe and push them out the garage effectively

 

44 minutes ago, joysterm said:

you could fabricate a smaller door panel with the proper size fitting and place it in the door opening and  close the door resting on the fabricated panel. Not that appealing perhaps from the street but a decent fix

 

A direct venting system sounds very cool, but way beyond ... well everything.  I'm more thinking your second suggestion - a simple exhaust pipe exit through the door / fabricated piece.  My garage is 300 feet from my house, about 400 from the street (it at the back of an acre plot) so I'm not too concerned about curb appeal.  Hell, to that point, I live next to a house that's been abandoned for 18 years, so we're looking good by comparison, lol.

 

31 minutes ago, Son of Marty said:

I just put a cheap garage sale box fan about 6" from the exhaust outlet and run it on high  pointing out the door when the car is running this is of course only going to work with the car close to the door and parked nose in. Also experience has shown a post it note saying FAN on the steering wheel will greatly improve fan life

 

2 hours ago, '76mintgrün'02 said:

I've plugged gutter downspout onto mine

 

Yes, I think that and an aforementioned more rigid exhaust extension pipe going through the door or a fabricated panel will be the answer.  

 

2 hours ago, jgerock said:

Wish I had a garage like that! 

 

51 minutes ago, joysterm said:

First I wish I had the same problem.......what a great space for your toys.

 

When we moved to SC about 8 years ago, we of course bought a 100 year old fixer upper with no garage.  Bonus is the house is historic, 9 foot ceilings, 5 fireplaces, and is across the street from the college where my wife works.  Her commute is 4 minutes, walking, to her office.  The downside was that we needed to clear the back 3/4 acre of jungle, and it had no garage.  Along with no basement or usable attic, we needed a place to put cars and all that crap you keep in the basement.  So building a garage was always in the cards, it just took about 4 years to get there, and another 2 to get electrical out there, lights, insulated, and AC / heat.  Now at least the space is usable, the lift will be the next big step.  (... and not to intentionally make anyone cry, but the whole thing came in around $25k, you gotta love cheap southern labor and materials)  

   

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Holy cats- the permit for mine was almost half that!

 

The only thing that REALLY worked was the sucker fan setup at

the auto electric shop next to us.  They had it plumbed to every bay-

but you could get one bigger blower, hook up one hose, and just vent

out the back.  The blower can be pretty simple- I have one out of an old furnace

that I put a smaller motor pulley on.  Pretty quiet, moves a LOT of air.

You DO need to make an external vent, if you're going to back in-

short distances work better.

Then you need the nozzles that hook properly over the

exhaust- they clip on, but let a bit of air suck in around them, so volume

stays up and concentrations stay low.  I'm sure you could buy them-

but I like to scrounge, so maybe $100 in Craigslist 'junk', repurposed?

 

Now, back to my first thought- most 2002's should be started.

idled for maybe 15-30 seconds, and then off you go. If it takes longer,

fix the choke! 

Even the race car gets 5 minutes (at most, first session, rock solid oil)

and then I get on it for an easy first warm- up lap.

The more revolutions it does cold, the more scuffing, ring wear, piston wear,

etc it does, so loading it gently to warm it more quickly is, in my overinflated opinion,

better than idling that long.

 

wow, second cup of coffee kicked in, huh?

 

t

(and yes, I would love a DeeEss...)

Edited by TobyB

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4 hours ago, 7502 said:

 

I like the Citroen (if that's what it is). 

BTW........what's behind Door #3?

 

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If your going to run the car in a closed shop you'll need to provide some form of fresh air intake into the building to replace the air your car is busy turning into exhaust, new construction (if it's built like a house with insulation and building wrap) is way to tight to count on air leakage alone. Maybe check out garage journal and see what they have done.

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Check out a company ACS they make crush proof hose that works well and is made for this application. We used an inline metal cone fan mounted to wall. I know ACS makes complete systems for home garages as well. Our home made system pulls enough vacuum that nothing gets by...even with a very loose hose over end of tailpipe, which you want so you are not pulling vacuum on exhaust and so it cools exhaust which will make your fan last longer.

Too much coffee as well!! Suprised I bothered with punctuation!! Be safe, CO detectors should be first thing. I am a contractor and do confined space work therefore I have all the measuring equipment, it is surprising what you measure even in well sealed/sorted cars!

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

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Yeah, don't follow my example stated above... and die or anything.

I've just done that a couple of times to run the fumes out under the blasting cabinet, that sits behind my car in the open poly tarp carport.

 

On a slightly similar note, I have noticed that it gets pretty stinky under the hood, with the air cleaner removed and the valve cover vent open.  I have even added a little section of hose, to carry it over to the carb intake, when I had a bit of fiddling to do with it running.

 

 

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1 hour ago, TobyB said:

and yes, I would love a DeeEss...)

 

love sometimes yes... much frustrated a lot of the time.... but I still love the goddess  

 

1 hour ago, joysterm said:

BTW........what's behind Door #3?

 

the project '74tii, been slow (actually dead stop) progress lately.  Need to install the Esty carpet set.  Will probably be on the market in the Spring.   (arrival)

IMG_2484.JPG.91a6c21b1344e73d4940b7923f41b7c6.JPG

(washed)

IMG_2509.JPG.3cf48d873cea16516922cc7bcda14d2e.JPG

 

1 hour ago, Son of Marty said:

If your going to run the car in a closed shop you'll need to provide some form of fresh

 

1 hour ago, TobyB said:

Now, back to my first thought- most 2002's should be started.

idled for maybe 15-30 seconds, and then off you go. If it takes longer,

fix the choke! 

 

Perhaps I'm not being clear / explaining correctly.  I'm really only looking to run the car a few minutes here and there - tuning, checking electrical, repairs, etc.  Perhaps my 10 minute running guess was too long.  I've just let the car warm up enough to watch the warm up regulator work / return the car from high idle to idle.  

 

@ Toby, no choke, it takes a couple of minutes for the warm up regulator to cycle.  Currently the car is running fine, but I need to fettle with it a bit (I'm not getting 10mm on the WUR) and there is a vacuum leak around the throttle body).  

 

 

 

 

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I've liked this idea for keeping flying insects out during the summer months

 

https://www.improvementscatalog.com/imp/408023?utm_source=connexity&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=cse&SourceCode=MM8XSZILLA&szredirectid=15406725427300385880510070302008005&CA_6C15C=120245390000326302

 

 

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