Scottjeffrey

Heater valve question

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When I purchased my car recently, it required some WD40 to get my heater valve working from in the car. I am waiting on some grommets and a defroster cable to put my heater box back together. I would like very much to save the $90 for a rebuild kit of the valve.. I have been working the lever back and forth and dosing it with more WD40. 

My question is this, when operating properly, do you still feel some 'drag' when moving the lever back and forth? Or should it feel super easy. Mine is smooth but requiring a little effort, say from 1-10 with ten being a lot of effort and 1 totally effortless, mine is maybe a three and a half lol. Any opinions are welcome and much appreciated.

Scott

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There will always be some drag, but get some non-dirt gathering lubricant and apply to the cable where you can and cycle the lever.  It may loosen up a bit if it hasn't been used much lately.  Regular oil works for the short term, but gums up after the dirt collects on the wire.

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Thanks Jimk for responding. The cable's movement in its jacket is great (now disconnected from the valve, heater box out of the car at this time) and I will add some lubricant as well. My main concern was the lever on the water valve itself. I have it out of the car and am 'working it'. If as you say, some drag is normal with the valve's lever itself, I should be good to go and $90 the better for it. Thank you!

Scott

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If you're used to the water control valves on new(er) cars, they're mostly solenoid controlled, so are pretty much effortless.  These '02 have direct cable control (kinda like a manual choke cable), and the valve itself has pretty close clearances to keep it from leaking.  Both cause some drag when operating the dash lever.

 

Bottom line is that they were comparatively stiff even when new.  A small detail--make sure that the little bolt that holds the valve end of the control cable in place is free to rotate on the end of the bellcrank (the arm that's attached to the rotating valve itself).  If it doesn't or can't move, it will quickly cause the end of the cable to break off, making it a few mm too short to use.  It also makes the valve's operation much stiffer it it's frozen.

 

mike

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Did the cable ever work before? If it's not turning the valve inside as you pull it, you might want to remove the valve and test it. 

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Try a real lubricant rather than WD40. I suggest Triflow. Sprays on wet, then evaporates and leaves a dry lubricant behind. However, it is hard to get the lubricant into the bowden cable. If it is corroded inside, you may need to replace it. These things are pretty crude by modern cable standards and will never work as smooth and effortlessly as a newer throttle cable.

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(edited)

I like Triphlow too.  With Tephlon.  

 

You can add some weedeeter fuel line for those hard to reach jobs... like heeter valves that have not been remooved... or heeter fan bearings that have neVer been loobed.

001.thumb.JPG.1fd70a5b2f7e50c02a8631575f2c436e.JPG

 

I like WD-40 for remooving sticker residoo and cutting/drilling aloominum. 

Edited by '76mintgrün'02
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Thanks gentlemen. Much appreciated. I have the valve working very well now along with the cable too. Thanks for the Triflow with teflon information. Buying some today. Wishing everyone a great weekend.

Scott

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11 hours ago, Chris_B said:

Try a real lubricant rather than WD40. I suggest Triflow. Sprays on wet, then evaporates and leaves a dry lubricant behind. However, it is hard to get the lubricant into the bowden cable. If it is corroded inside, you may need to replace it. These things are pretty crude by modern cable standards and will never work as smooth and effortlessly as a newer throttle cable.

Get one of these, it will get the lube right down the cable 

 

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B0774YJS81/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

Thanks to Mustie1, great show on youtube. 

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Hi Dudeland. That looks very cool and cheap. I will try it. Thank you and hope all is well. My water valve after repeated doses of WD is now moving beautiful. I will try your suggestion for my cables however. Have a great weekend!

Scott

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(edited)

I’m not real sure why the $90 kit is necessary.  You just take it apart, clean it, grease it liberally with silicone grease (silglyde), and replace the o-rings with some appropriately sized ones from the hardware store for about 50 cents each.  Err a bit toward the tight fitting ones, and put some silglyde on them too.  

In my case I also had a busted plastic pin on the inside rotating part, preventing it from turning it at all.  I replaced it with a nail and epoxied it in place.  Been working fine now for probably 10 years or more.

Edited by KFunk
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