hankeester

Grill slat options

37 posts in this topic Last Reply

Recommended Posts

I took off the two grill sides and the kidney thinking I wanted to do a minor restore on them and found that they had these black aluminum slat covers over them which used to be black but are pretty faded. The

covers weren't on all the grill slats leaving a couple on each side the original chrome color. Now I'm trying to decide whether or not to paint the slat covers or use striping black tape like I've heard many of you doing here

on the forums. I'm also curious as to if these slat covers were original to the car or an afterthought. My other dilemma is that there is a build up of glue on the chrome grill slats from the covers and have tried

everything from rubbing alcohol to mineral spirits to remove it but nothing is working to remove the residue. If anyone has any suggestions I'd be open on the glue removal. I've seen many pics of 

front grilles on 2002's turned racing cars or non-racing cars with some of the horizontal slats blackened and some in the middle being left chrome color. I'm curious if there's any pattern per year

of car or if the different black/chrome slats combinations are just personal preference.

grill with glue on it.jpg

grill with slats.jpg

slat covers.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the factory, all round taillight 2002’s (1968 through 1973) had seven of the nine slats “blacked out”. Starting at the top of the grilles, the 3rd and 6th slats down were left silver (anodized aluminum). The 1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, 7th, 8th, and 9th slats from the top were blacked out. 1968, 1969, and some (?) 1970 models used simple paint to black out the slats. It failed...really fast. From 1970-ish through 1973, BMW used black anodized slat covers to black out the seven slats on each side.  They work much better, but after 40 or so years, even they will fade.

 

Given how badly paint adhered to the slats on the early 2002’s, you might want to at least try the tape method.... 😗

 

Regards,

 

Steve

 

531E8094-99CE-42F0-81B8-E55DCD93C3B7.jpeg

E102845E-321A-46BB-9C1B-446067A42F27.jpeg

Edited by Conserv

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Conserv,

 

thanks for that, good to learn a bit more on the history of these cars. I will go with the tape method given I can get that stubborn glue off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I purchased a set of grilles with faded/missing slats to put on my 1968.  I decided to paint them black to maintain originality (that's how they came in 1968).  Removing the glue was difficult and tedious.  In the end, soaking them in acetone worked for me.  There are a few threads in this forum that discuss other methods- you'll find them if you search. I used Direct to Metal (DTM)  paint.  There as a definite paint pattern, as Steve described above.  This is the paint I used:  https://www.amazon.com/POR-15-45908-Chassis-Black-Coat/dp/B00SI7B9CU    Worked out well for me,  I would think that applying black tape can be a tedious process as well, as the glue would still need to be removed so it applies smoothy..  You did not mention the year of your car, but if its a 1970 to 1973, you may consider purchasing new slats, which are available from several vendors.  I think the cost is in the neighborhood of $100 - $110 per side. 

Have fun!

Sal

Edited by Sal Savino
Correct link to purchase paint on Amazon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can attest from experience that the painted grilles used in '68 and '69 started to chip after about 6 months of use.  I had a friend who worked in the Ford design studio; he sent me a roll of 3M "blackout tape" (no ordinary electrical tape, much sturdier stuff)  that the designers used to simulate black trim on clay models.  It was still sticking 25 years later when I cleaned it off and repainted to take the car back to original.  My careful aluminum self-etching primer followed by SEM black trim paint....started to chip after about a year.  So now I just touch it up as necessary.

 

Permanent marking pens will do a very nice job of darkening the appliques, but you'll need to re-do every few months.  Quick and dirty fix, though.

 

mike

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My '72 slats came painted and were quite chipped.  I cleaned all the paint off with acetone.  It took about an hour to soften and remove the paint.  I used 1" wide 3M striping tape to redo them.  They came out great and will hold up way better than paint.  If you don't make any mistakes... well maybe one mistake, a 20 foot roll will get it done.

 

IMG_0364.thumb.jpg.174ca957c32d4615713f24c8bc928756.jpg

 

IMG_0368.thumb.jpg.eca75bc9e0e1df49a14567bef384f166.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Sal Savino said:

I purchased a set of grilles with faded/missing slats to put on my 1968.  I decided to paint them black to maintain originality (that's how they came in 1968).  Removing the glue was difficult and tedious.  In the end, soaking them in acetone worked for me.  There are a few threads in this forum that discuss other methods- you'll find them if you search. I used Direct to Metal (DTM)  paint.  There as a definite paint pattern, as Steve described above.  This is the paint I used:  https://www.amazon.com/POR-15-45908-Chassis-Black-Coat/dp/B00SI7B9CU    Worked out well for me,  I would think that applying black tape can be a tedious process as well, as the glue would still need to be removed so it applies smoothy..  You did not mention the year of your car, but if its a 1970 to 1973, you may consider purchasing new slats, which are available from several vendors.  I think the cost is in the neighborhood of $100 - $110 per side. 

Have fun!

Sal

Mine is a 71'.  I like the idea of the tape and have some on order, and seems a bit cheaper than purchasing the new slat covers. From NY Tranplant's pics, the tape job looks very nice.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, hankeester said:

Mine is a 71'.  I like the idea of the tape and have some on order, and seems a bit cheaper than purchasing the new slat covers. From NY Tranplant's pics, the tape job looks very nice.

 

NY Transplant did a particularly tidy job with his taping, angling the tape ends to match the radius of the headlight surround! The factory could only dream of such perfection but I’ll bet the car’s designers wished for that level of perfection!

 

Regards,

 

Steve

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Conserv said:

 

NY Transplant did a particularly tidy job with his taping, angling the tape ends to match the radius of the headlight surround! The factory could only dream of such perfection but I’ll bet the car’s designers wished for that level of perfection!

 

Regards,

 

Steve

 

 

That's what I was looking at, his attention to detail at the tape ends...

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, hankeester said:

That's what I was looking at, his attention to detail at the tape ends...

 

What can I say, I'm an engineer by training 😉  

 

Actually, it did work out well to cut the tape to the correct length and angle first.  That took the most time, but once cut, they go on with no trimming once applied, other than a little bit on the reverse side of the grille.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so ...

i have two 1600s ... born in July and October of 1969 ...

both are full chrome/silver slats ...

is that a subtle distinction between the 1602 and the 2002?

full chrome versus black slats?

 

i like both looks ... and the tape seems a fabulous (and low entry) way to test out if the look is right for each particular car ...

 

cheers!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Geoff Raynak said:

so ...

i have two 1600s ... born in July and October of 1969 ...

both are full chrome/silver slats ...

is that a subtle distinction between the 1602 and the 2002?

full chrome versus black slats?...

 

 

Yes, that is precisely how you could originally distinguish a 1600-2 from a 2002!

 

Over the last 50 years, however, owners have both knowingly and unwittingly used 1600-2 grilles on 2002’s, and vice versa, making that once-easy tell-tale much less dependable... 😉

 

Below are a July 1967 1600-2 brochure and an April 1968 2002 brochure.

 

Regards,

 

Steve

 

Oops. David already answered the question!

 

3EF6CC8B-C57A-45B5-838E-165DB1B493A2.jpeg

908793C7-0ECC-46A6-A49D-655DF413A6F6.jpeg

Edited by Conserv

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now