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Just changed wheel bearings on all 4 corners of my '74 tii t


Guest Anonymous

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Guest Anonymous

MAN...what a difference!! The car literally feels like a Caddy in comparison to before. Before, there were all these moans and groans at highway speed, and they got worse around high speed sweepers...Now: Ahhh! The beautiful sound of SILENCE! I recommend this fix to anyone who is experiencing this type of resonating noise at freeway speeds...HUGE improvement!

Coop

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Guest Anonymous

bearings out would make a noticeable difference. Now I know...Now give us the bad part..if you please. What did it cost?bose2002.jpg

Have fun, Bose

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Guest Anonymous

When I did mine, I had to chesel one of the castellated nuts off. It was no fun at all b/c it's a special hardened nut.

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Guest Anonymous

Having just been through this on my '76 with the big brake upgrade here's a few tips...

1. Get a 36mm impact socket to remove the castellated nut. Soak with liquid wrench and go at it HARD with the impact wrench, these don't wanna come off. The nut-whacker VW tool doesn't work soo well, as it interferes with the wheel studs. Napa will have the socket you need.

2. Make sure and ziptie/wire the hanging stub axel up to the spring and out of the way once you disconnect it.

3. Have a really big drift to drive out the old bearings, be carefull not to scracth up subframe when you drive them out.

4. A hub puller may be required to get your hubs off. Mine came off easy, but most dont.

5. Have a big ass hammer, and something soft to pound on. You'll need it to drive the spindle bits out.

6. Make sure and have something to drive the new bearings in wiht. I used an old one ground down slightly, and an old timing chain sprocket to bang on.

7. Make sure to pay attention to all the spacers, which way the go in and in which order when you take it apart write it down!!!

8. LOTS of bearing grease, I used Kendall Super Blue.

9. New cotter pins.

10. Drive for a hundred miles, and re-check the castellated nuts, they "will" be loose...

11. Speaking of tightenign nuts, you'll need a huge ass breaker bar to apply the right amount of torque to these, see the FAQ torgue specs.

That's all I can think of now, the bashed fingernail I have from this operation is still growing out weeks later.

-------------

BigDog

'76 2002 Big Brakes, New Wheel Bearings

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Guest Anonymous

16-8540914.JPG

the rear wheel bearings are not as easy a job as the fronts . The fronts are very simple interms of fitting parts , adjusting taper roller bearings.

The rear are ball bearing and if you manage to beat and pound all the bits out of the swingarms, measurement is crucial to correct reassemble. Many cars molested have the incorrect adjustment shims, or , worse, no shims . installation is crucial , great care not to damage the new bearings . not a day job. and not for the casual knucklebanging-spanner twister.

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Guest Anonymous

pull the trailing arms and have a machine shop do the press-work on the stub axles and bearings. Good idea to remove the big castellated nuts on the stub axles, unbolt the outer CV joints, and pull the rear hubs before unbolting the trailing arms.

Certainly not necessary, but it's not a bad idea to repack the CV joints and replace the boots while everything's apart and access is easy, then drive secure in the knowledge that everything's fresh.

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Guest Anonymous

I've used this method in the past to install headset races in bicylcles...

Get a really long carriage bolt and an assortment of washers in the right sizes. eg. same size as bearings, bigger to fit outside where hte bearings fit in, and several smaller ones for spacers...

Then use it like a press, thread it through the middle and tighten, this can drive the bearings in. I wasn't patient enough to go through the parts accumulation to build one of these 'home made' bearing presses for this job, but it should be straight forward.

Good luck!

--

BD

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Guest Anonymous

Hypothetically: If I took this to a BMW dealer or specialty shop would they know how to do this. IOW; is the procedure for a newer BMW the same as it is for our "antiques"? What is the "standard catalog" price for this job - assuming everything comes apart normally?

-Jerry

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Guest Anonymous

the spacer sleeve blocks any attempt at a real puller.

The biggest BFH you can reasonably manage makes a big difference- I whalloped hell out of 'em with a 1 lb on Jenn's car, but the 4lb made light work of 'em on mine.

Also check your center sleeve. If the center nut's come loose in past, the center sleeve can wear, making the tolerance wrong. THis'll cause noise and premature bearing failure.

fwiw,

t

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