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Question for those who have gutted an '02 for parts


Guest Anonymous

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Guest Anonymous

I'm about to embark on this and was wondering what pointers anyone may have for keeping things orderly and organized. The "Rot Bucket" is coming this weekend and I want to be ready for her arrival and gutting. It's a '69 and structurally, potentially a mess. But there's lots of goodies on her. I know what I do but how about the rest of you?? Any tips or tricks you've found that work on completely gutting an '02 or anything to watch out for?? Any suggestions or advice is welcome. Or if you're in need of something, and I don't need it, I may be willing to part with "things".

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Guest Anonymous

rustmonster.jpg

Oh yeah..mechanix gloves too.

I learned a great deal about our cars by tearing one apart. I put in an hour or two each evening stripping stuff out and putting it in a pile. On the weekends I took a blank spreadsheet out to the garage and logged everything as I put the parts in numbered boxes. The 4 large boxes are under the deck.

I nearly wore out one set of stanley mechanic gloves. They were a worthwhile investment, as I could see the damage to my skin that was averted by the gloves.

Take your time on the glass. I cracked my windshield when I got in a hurry.

The engine and transmission fits perfectly on one of those hand dollys that can be put flat. I put it in the flat position and can roll it around (my son thinks it would make a cool go-cart). I pulled the engine and tranny together.

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Guest Anonymous

I used alot of ziploc bags of varying sizes for smaller parts. the ones I use have an area where you can write in marker a description of the contents.

pictures! I take lots of digital pics I can refer to later on in case I can't remember how a part went on the car.

documentation - as previously suggested a text file or spreadsheet accounting for your parts.

rubber gloves are always good to have/use

patience is key. don't tear anything out as you will most likely need that very same part you tore later on.

drain all fluids prior to disassembly of related parts.

keep nuts and bolts together with removed parts. If you need to separate nuts/bolts from items use a cardboard box (or cardboard flap), poke holes in it and place your bolts in those holes using it as a "holder" with a description on the box of what the bolt is for.

keep like parts together. don't mix under dash screws with headlight screws, etc. as later on it may not make sense to you.

good luck.

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Guest Anonymous

wouldn't hurt to give bolts and other loose metal bits a smear of grease to prevent/slow down rust if they sit for a while.

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Guest Anonymous

with virtually no rust, even on internal engine parts (it was dismantled) 'cause the PO had smeared grease on the cylinder bores,crank journals, pistons and rods etc., then wrapped in newspapers, plastic or waxed paper.

Ziploc bags are also good--put rust-prone parts in the bag, squirt with a little WD40 and seal up.

Cheers

Mike

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Guest Anonymous

I'll have to drop in at Costco some time soon and look for these. I think I know the ones your talking about though.

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Guest Anonymous

Someone was mentioning for the glass, hit up one of the glass shops that may be throwing out the cardboard that the replacement windows they stock come in.

How about dash storage, seats, etc, etc??

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Guest Anonymous

I have a bucket of shifter parts, a bucket of alternators, bucket of carbs and fuel pumps, bucket of belts hoses and thermostats, etc. The soap isn't bad either.

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Guest Anonymous

They come in convenient 20, 40, and 53 foot legnths.

Of course your neighbors might complain, so be ready to build a garage...wait, maybe THAT is not a good idea.

Actually had a friend who stored all his parts UNDER his parents house. They did not have a basement, just a crawlspace. Trannys, seats, fenders, hoods, trunk lids, etc... All under there.

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Guest Anonymous

....bag with a Sharpie. I then place bags in boxes and then label the boxes. Take your time. Be neat, methodical, and document. You'll thank yourself later when you're looking for a specific part and know right where to go. Store in a cool dry place. Larger objects like glass go in the attic over my garage as do things that won't be damaged by heat such as bumpers, body panels, gas tanks (cleaned), metal trim, old seats that need re-upholstering, etc. Dashboards, consoles, electronics, et. in basement-clean and dry. Heavy parts such as trannys, diffs, motors, etc go on a very stout rack made from 2x4s along the wall in my garage. Engines that were running well are left intact and still mounted on the front subframe and then placed on a cart for stability. I like to label the bags with the year, color, and vin the car came from. Use a sawzall and cut unusable body parts away from good parts-i.e. don't pull the motor-remove body from around it. Don't go under the car-cut car away to expose parts. This is very easy and fast. I use a Sawzall with a Milwaukee "Cutting Torch" 8 inch blade. Multiple dumpster (check construction sites) runs disposes of cars without the hassle and expense of having the car hauled by a scrapper.

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