Hodgepodge

Interior padding/insulation question...

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I started to take out the interior tonight and was surprised to see that the stick on padding/insulation is in trememdous shape so far and just needs a good vacuuming to get the horsehear and old yellowjackets out of the crannies and a wipe down.    So I'm inclined to just leave it since I wasn't planning on painting the inside of the car anyway.   Is there any other reason why I would want to remove it?   I know it is a real PITA.  

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I have not pulled up the carpet yet, so I guess the real test will be under the driver's seat carpet.  

 

Anybody else have a similar situation?   

Edited by Hodgepodge

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I removed mine totally with a few pounds  of dry ice,  then replaced it with Dynamat after it the floor was bead blasted and epoxy primered.

 

I wanted to insure there was absolutely no rust lurking and undiscovered.

 

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Edited by joysterm

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It depends on what your goal is.

 

Many vintage car owners view “restoration” as an opportunity to perfect a mass-produced car, in effect, a chance to build a better version of the car than the factory could, and/or to modernize the car by installing modern sound deadening, modern technology, stainless fasteners, etc.  This is their prerogative as owners and this was my viewpoint 30 to 40 years ago.

 

But vintage cars also have a distinct charm and feel in their original state: imperfect, limited by mass production methods, and limited by the technology of their time.  And not every old car is rusted and requiring complete disassembly and reconstruction.  My viewpoint today is to repair that which needs repair, re-paint that which needs re-painting.

 

My ‘76 had extremely limited rust and rather than tear it apart to make a better ‘02, I left all the original insulation in place, the original headliner in place, and anything else that was in very good condition or better.  Could rust be hiding under some of those items?  I suppose so, although there were no traces whatsoever in exposed areas or underneath the car.   If there is rust hidden under these components, it’s moving mighty slowly!  And if the car ever shows evidence of rust, we’ll dig in and address it.  But even then, I’ll probably fight to preserve whatever original materials can be salvaged.

 

Regards,

 

Steve

 

 

 

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Edited by Conserv
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Steve, we think alike on the don't do it if it doesn't really need to be done factor.   The car already has a Weber and I'm removing the smog stuff, but the car will be a modern equivalent of what it might have been in '75.  I am keeping the headliner, which is almost perfect. Engine rebuilt to stock.  Keeping the 4-speed.  Different wheels.  Different shocks. Some minor suspension changes.  The idea is to make it as fun, good looking and reliable as it was in '75.  

 

I'll continue to peel carpet and cards back but right now I think this is all going to stay.   

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If it ain't broke......... or something along those lines 😜

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I left the rear trunk insulation in place but 'dry ice ice baby'd' the floor and tranny tunnel. I needed to take care of some rust and once I got started just did the whole floor and firewall area. I felt MUCH better getting a clean, unobstructed look at the floors and what needed to be done, but will be pretty conservative about sound proofing/insulating those cleaned up areas. I'm not convinced the 'beer cooler' effect even works or is necessary. I'm also on Steve's page about an old car staying like an old car, even though I'm making some pretty drastic improvements to certain areas.

Edited by NYNick

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With respect to one’s philosophical approach to vintage cars, and other vintage items — I’m an old house guy — I believe there is a broad continuum that stretches from:

 

(A.) examining, questioning, and improving on every piece, every last nut and bolt, to

 

(Z.) repairing solely items in need of repair, using period-appropriate materials, finishes, methods, and tools.

 

Each of us falls somewhere along that continuum, for reasons that lay in our pasts, our presents, and, critically, our pocketbooks.

 

In 1980, as the ‘76 was passing 75,000 miles, I was clearly close to (A.) philosophically, but I could never have afforded the money or time required for that approach. And perhaps that was, in the long run, a good thing as, nearly 40 years later, I wound up with a fairly-original, and amazingly-stock 1976 car: a rarity in 2018.

 

Today, I am much closer to (Z.) than to (A.).  But I am certainly not at (Z.). For instance, I would never consider putting Glasurit “PVC-frei” two-stage metallic paint on my ‘76 — if you could find someone to mix that miserable crap — so that I could re-live the heartbreak of paint that fails within 2 to 4 years. And I regularly powdercoat items that were originally painted. And I didn’t encourage my painter to make paint runs in the engine compartment to duplicate the factory finish. And my exhaust manifold and downpipe have Jet-Hot coatings. And I generally re-plate in yellow zinc items that were originally plated in yellow cadmium. So, particularly in the area of finishes, I have embraced modern technology or, in the case of re-plating, ease of accessibility and reduced cost.

 

Based on my experience, I thus believe that each of us chooses our own place on that philosophical continuum, and that location on the continuum, like mine, moves over time, sometimes materially. Mine really moved; but, then, a lot changes over 40 years!

 

Regards,

 

Steve

 

Edited by Conserv
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9 minutes ago, Conserv said:

With respect to one’s philosophical approach to vintage cars, and other vintage items — I’m an old house guy — I believe there is a broad continuum that stretches from:

 

(A.) examining, questioning, and improving on every piece, every last nut and bolt, to

 

(Z.) repairing solely items in need of repair, using period-appropriate materials, finishes, methods, and tools.

 

Each of us falls somewhere along that continuum, for reasons that lay in our pasts, our presents, and, critically, our pocketbooks.

 

In 1980, as the ‘76 was passing 75,000 miles, I was clearly close to (A.) philosophically, but I could never have afforded the money or time required for that approach. And perhaps that was, in the long run, a good thing as, nearly 40 years later, I wound up with a fairly-original, and certainly very-stock car: a rarity in 2018.

 

Today, I am much closer to (Z.) than to (A.).  But I am certainly not at (Z.). For instance, I would never consider putting Glasurit “PVC-frei” two-stage metallic paint on my ‘76 — if you could find someone to mix that miserable crap — so that I could re-live the heartbreak of paint that fails within 2 to 4 years. And I regularly powdercoat items that were originally painted. And I didn’t encourage my painter to make paint runs in the engine compartment to duplicate the factory finish. And my exhaust manifold and downpipe have Jet-Hot coatings. And I generally re-plate in yellow zinc items that were originally plated in yellow cadmium. So, particularly in the area of finishes, I have embraced modern technology or, in the case of re-plating, ease of accessibility and reduced cost.

 

Based on my experience, I thus believe that each of us chooses our own place on that philosophical continuum, and that place, like mine, moves over time, sometimes materially. Mine really did; but, then, a lot changes over 40 years!

 

Regards,

 

Steve

 

steve...i don't even know what that means....i'd leave the original padding alone and waste time, energy and money on something that needs to be fixed....

 

Z (x3pi sq) + A-v6

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16 minutes ago, esty said:

steve...i don't even know what that means....i'd leave the original padding alone and waste time, energy and money on something that needs to be fixed....

 

Z (x3pi sq) + A-v6

 

Clearly too much time on my hands, esty.... 😋

 

Best regards,

 

Steve

 

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If you don't see the beginnings of rust where the reinforcements for the rear subframe mounts are welded to the floorpan under the back seat, you're most likely rust-free there.  You can markedly reduce road and differential noise by filling  the area under the back seat with foam (flexible or rigid styrofoam) packing, or even some sturdy plastic bags filled with styrofoam peanuts.  They really do make a difference.  

 

And I'm with Steve about conserving our '02s...whenever I've added something to the car, I try to do it in such a way that when I remove it, I don't leave extra holes (like clamping driving lights to the bumper brackets vs drilling holes in the bumper itself).  Works for me...

 

mike

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2 hours ago, Conserv said:

With respect to one’s philosophical approach to vintage cars, and other vintage items — I’m an old house guy — I believe there is a broad continuum that stretches from:

 

(A.) examining, questioning, and improving on every piece, every last nut and bolt, to

 

(Z.) repairing solely items in need of repair, using period-appropriate materials, finishes, methods, and tools.

 

Each of us falls somewhere along that continuum, for reasons that lay in our pasts, our presents, and, critically, our pocketbooks.

 

In 1980, as the ‘76 was passing 75,000 miles, I was clearly close to (A.) philosophically, but I could never have afforded the money or time required for that approach. And perhaps that was, in the long run, a good thing as, nearly 40 years later, I wound up with a fairly-original, and amazingly-stock car: a rarity in 2018.

 

Today, I am much closer to (Z.) than to (A.).  But I am certainly not at (Z.). For instance, I would never consider putting Glasurit “PVC-frei” two-stage metallic paint on my ‘76 — if you could find someone to mix that miserable crap — so that I could re-live the heartbreak of paint that fails within 2 to 4 years. And I regularly powdercoat items that were originally painted. And I didn’t encourage my painter to make paint runs in the engine compartment to duplicate the factory finish. And my exhaust manifold and downpipe have Jet-Hot coatings. And I generally re-plate in yellow zinc items that were originally plated in yellow cadmium. So, particularly in the area of finishes, I have embraced modern technology or, in the case of re-plating, ease of accessibility and reduced cost.

 

Based on my experience, I thus believe that each of us chooses our own place on that philosophical continuum, and that place, like mine, moves over time, sometimes materially. Mine really did; but, then, a lot changes over 40 years!

 

Regards,

 

Steve

 

 

Wow Steve. That's what we used to call in the late 60's, "heavy man, heavy."

"Far out" too.

I love it. 

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Hodgepodge,

I was pondering the same thing, my interior pans and rear seat compartment are as dry as a good martini. So I was thinking why take it out.  I have a carpet on its way from our infamous you know who.  Think I'll do what Mike suggests, just put some foam under the back seat and not worry about it until the Federales gets suspicious.

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19 minutes ago, NYNick said:

Wow Steve. That's what we used to call in the late 60's, "heavy man, heavy."

"Far out" too.

I love it. 

 

I used to just “fix my car”, Nick. Now I spend more time contemplating what it all means, and how it will affect the “historical record”. Yeah, man, it is far out!

 

Best regards,

 

Steve

 

Edited by Conserv

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You need help. Historical record? For the love of all that's petroleum related, our kids won't even be allowed to drive these cars after we're gone.

4 hours ago, Conserv said:

 

I used to just “fix my car”, Nick. Now I spend more time contemplating what it all means, and how it will affect the “historical record”. Yeah, man, it is far out!

 

Best regards,

 

Steve

 

I'm 50 minutes on the Harlem line from GC. Let's have a beer.

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