Hodgepodge

What to do once the engine is out...

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Howdy,  

 

I'm slowly working through the massive list of things to do to my '75 2002 and have finally decided to pull the engine so I can appropriately clean up, refresh and paint the engine, the engine bay, the front suspension, the drive train, etc.   I have all new auxiliary components (i.e. alternator, starter, water pump, fuel pump, intake manifold, header, a new valve cover, and new gaskets for valve cover, oil pan, timing chain cover and oil filter housing.) for the engine as well as all new suspension components, brakes, wheel bearings, etc.  I will also replace the clutch, slave cylinder and throw-out bearing since I will have the gearbox out.  Maybe the clutch master if it is leaking.  And will also repalce the guibo and maybe the center support bearing if appropriate.    

 

Here is the other info you may need to answer the question:  My car has about 128,000 miles on it.  The engine ran well when last run (although it leaked a lot of oil) and I did not plan on a rebuild because I wasn't going to pull it.  I was only going to replace gaskets and leave the head intact.  I have not yet run a compression or leakdown test although I still plan to do that on the stand. I also was planning on adjusting the vaves as needed once on the stand. (I have a pushbutton starter tool and a compression test set but no leakdown test kit.).     

 

Thanks for reading up to this point.  Here are the actual questions: 

 

1. Since I will have the engine out of the car, are there any absolute requirements in terms of maintenance beyond a thorough inspection of the valves, rockers, crank, etc.?  (I will re-evaluate if I see any issues,a broken tensioner, or scoring.)    

2. What about the freeze plugs?  Mine look awful.  Does it make sense to replace them while the engine is out or am I better off leaving them alone?   

3. I am guessing that there will be some sludge in the crank case, what are your ideas for cleaning it out without dissassembling everything?   

4. What else should I look for once I get the engine out?   I try to be thorough, but I would not bet that I have a complete list of things to check.   

 

There are a few pretty good machine shops near me, but I don't want to pull the head off unless consensus (or the inspection) says that it is necessary.  I rebuilt a 4-cylinder BMC wet-sleeve engine for a TR-3 about 20 years ago, but am a little apprehensive about  taking this one apart and don't really want to add another $3-5k to the rebuild budget.   My take is that these engines are generally very reliable and there are no major headaches (ullike, say, the Porche 996 IMS bearings or the BMW N54 fuel injectors/High Pressure Fuel Pump) that need to be addressed to avoid a future disaster.  

 

Your thoughts?  As always, they are welcome and appreciated.  

 

Thanks,   

 

Scott

 

 

 

 

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Assuming it was running acceptably well, I would keep it simple. Less is WAY more sometimes. Until you are ready to get down and dirty.  But we all know things tend to suffer project creep.. so if you want to look at in stages, this would be my, off-the-cuff breakdown.

 

Stage 1. Reseal for leaks. 

New timing cover, oil pan, valve cover, rear seal holder gaskets. (Careful not to bugger up the head gasket.)

New front and rear crank seals. 

New Freeze plugs. Because they are easy and cheap.

Clean the pan while its off. 

 

Stage 2.  Bolster oil pressure.

All of the above.

Pull and polish the crank.

New crank and rod bearings. 

New oil pump gear and chain.

 

Stage 3.  Bolster compression 

All of the above.

Pull head for basic valve job and new valve seals. (add a 284 cam if you're bored)

Pull pistons and add new rings.

Ball hone/deglaze the cylinders.

New Timing chain and gears.

Head gasket.

 

Stage 4.  Do it up.

All of the above, omitting lines where appropriate.

Complete disassembly and hot tanking of parts.

Proper bore and hone of block.

New cast pistons and rings.  OE flat tops or aftermarket 9,5:1 compression. 

New rocker shafts and rockers.

New cam. 284 for good torque on the street.

New valve springs.

 

Stage 5.  Hop it up

All of the above.

Forged 10.5 pistons 90mm bore.  (91+ octane fuel)

H beam rods.

292 cam.

HD rockers and springs

38/38 Weber Carb.

Header.

 

 

That was fun. !

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Building on Jason’s excellent advice, if it is truely running well then pulling the head should bring no fear. It is perfectly fine to hone and slap on some new rings to the bores that you find or even leave well alone and just address the head. 

 

The engine is out, it’s really only a small increment to pull the head. 

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OK, all good info.  I'm going to need to farm out at least a little of this.   Can anyone recommend a good machine shop or rebuilder in the Pittsburgh, PA area?    

 

 

 

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I've considered but not used VAC and in Philadelphia. While not Pittsburgh somewhat nearby.

 

They gave me me a quote for an S38 rebuild, unfortunately I didn't have a kidney to sell to afford that price.

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I'm closer to Columbus than Philly, which is 4.5 hours away.  Pittsburgh is a very isolated city, at least 2 hours from the next major city....if you can call Cleveland major.  Columbus is 2.5 hours away.  This is why car prices are so high here.   All the dealers are brand monopolies and they know you can't just go up the street to the next city.      

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While the engine is out you can reinforce the driver side engine mount on the subframe if it hasn't already been done.  If it isn't cracked now it will eventually so might as well get ahead of that.

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FunkyLane0,  Thanks for the tip.  I read about that wlsewhere and plan to pursue it.  

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I just got of the phone with a local rebuilding shop that was recommended by a few shops I use.  I called with the idea of doing stage 1 and 2 and possibly 3 from Eurotrashes list above.  The guy I spoke to there said that the biggest problem is that there are no aftermaket wear parts for the M10 engine (primarily rings and bearings) and that things that should cost $10s of dollars end up costing $1000s of dollars.   We all know the insane markup on BMW parts, so I thought I would just ask if anyone has found any viable aftermarket sources for M10 rings and bearings that can be trusted.  I already have most of the gaskets.   

 

Thanks,

 

Scott

 

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Before making plans on rings and bearings, buy or borrow some measurement tools and check your bores.  You may find pistons are necessary, which will change your plans.

 

If the bores are good, check the crank journals.

 

Your machine shop guy is just feeding you BMW stereotypes.  Parts for the M10 are plentiful and not that expensive.

 

I bought a lot of stuff from https://www.fcpeuro.com/  Gasket sets, bearings, rockers, etc, etc.  Rings were out of stock at the time, but then I found I had to buy new pistons, so it didn't matter.

 

Between FCP, Blunt, and IE, you should be able to get every part you need.  

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I'd scratch that shop off the list. All the wear parts are available and not over priced as these things go if you need new pistons they are a bit more costly then they were but rings, gaskets and bearings aren't bad.

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Sounds like that guy was just making a blanket statement about old Euro cars he had not worked on.

 

Rings can be had from Goetze (I consider them a good manufacturer) for around $20 per cylinder. Rod and crank bearings are no more expensive than other engines. I believe you can get both the rod and crank set for under $100 from Glyco (once again I consider them a reputable manufacturer).

 

Maybe he was talking about Lamborghini parts from the 70s???

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