2002#2

Rear Wheel Bearings and 64 mm

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Renewing Rear Wheel Bearings (WB) During Rebuild of Rear Suspension 

 

Are my following interpretations/assumptions re: correct rear WB spacing?

 

1.  WB should be separated by 64 mm (+/- 0.1 mm). 

2.  64 mm (+/- 0.1 mm) should provide the required ~0.1 mm of play between the WB. 

2.  Ideally, a 64-mm (+/- 0.1 mm) spacer (A in diagram]) will do the job.

3.  Shims of various thickness serve three purposes:

     a.  adjust distance in case spacer is <64mm, shims/sides are accidentally switched, starting from scratch, etc.
     b.  take up the space (black part of space in C in diagram]) between the outer WB seat in the trailing arm (TA) and the outer race of the outer WB (see NOTE), and

     c.  accept torque and provide preload prior to final tightening.
4.  B in the diagram is the distance between the TA WB seats.

5.  If old bearings have worked well over the last many thousands of miles, (i) the current spacer and shims are correct and are in correct positions/order and (ii) there is no need to remeasure.

NOTE:  This one (#3b) seems extremely important to me.  Maybe it is not.  Without that shim there appears to be a small space between these two.  Therefore, no inner support for the outer race of the outer WB.  

 

Thanks.

 

Larry 

 

ccs-32029-0-04225800-1382972224.png.a67029f80043034e595dd312091afe86.png

 

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You have it right. If there is no shim you risk over tightening the hub nut which can damage the stub axle. 

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Note 6: inspect the spacer contact area on the hub carefully- if there are any signs of wear or galling,

check bearing spacing carefully.

 

Note 7:  when in doubt, assemble dry without seals.  Snug the nut, make sure the stub spins

freely.  Add a little torque, repeat.  Add full torque, repeat.

 

hth,

t

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