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another E30 question


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steve's changing the timing belt on our lasted addition, an 87 e30...he pulled off the camshaft sprocket to change the seal...he  chip out piece where the sprocket alignment pin fits...will this be a problem....we sure don't want to change the cam

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the sprocket seems to fit tightly and the pin does still fit far enough in the hole so it shouldn't spin

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please say this isn't a huge problem or it is

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Hi,

 

First off, I should mention that I have ZERO experience with the M20 engine so take this engineer's observations with as many grains of salt as you feel comfortable.

 

The torque on that M10 bolt is 65 Nm (48 lbs-ft), which is pretty substantial.  Because of that, it seems that the 8 mm dowel pin is not going to be bearing much of the torque load when the engine is running.  If you can torque the bolt to spec with a dowel in that cracked hole, my guess is that you will be okay.

 

Secondly, the way that crack is, you have more than half of the circumference still present.  That will keep the dowel from moving and therefore the alignment will be true.  The missing piece does not contribute too much to taking the torque load - a slot would have worked fine in that location instead of a hole.

 

If you can lock the camshaft from turning while you torque the sprocket bolt, you will be kinder to the broken portion.  Perhaps wedge some blocks of soft wood against the cam in a safe location?

 

$.02, but usual disclaimers apply :-)

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Is the surface that the shaft seal rides on all there?  if not the seal won't be there for long.  This engine runs with a negative pressure in the crankcase in an attempt to keep the oil in better.  Just loosen the oil fill cap with it running and it will be apparent.

Normal procedure is to leave the sprocket alone, remove the lower dampener and cover plus the tensioner and slide the belt off with crank on the TDC mark and cam sprocket on it's mark.

BTW the tensioner is set on it's spring and the engine rolled over several times to settle the belt then tighten the tensioner bolt.  It doesn't run on it's spring for tension.

 

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1 hour ago, Healey3000 said:

$.02, but usual disclaimers apply :-)

i think it will be good myself but we'd rather be safe than sorry...

 

jim, there's a seal & o'ring behind the sprocket recommended to be changed when changing timing belt...otherwise, we would not have removed the sprocket...the belt would come off with the sprocket in place...as it turned out, the seal is leaking

 

"There's a small O-ring that fits into the cylinder head (green arrow) and a spring-seal that fits around the rotating end of the camshaft (red arrow)."

 

Pic15-01.jpg.5c64894148ac446b2953709c5df8c44c.jpg

 

  

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6 hours ago, jimk said:

I always had more trouble with the valve cover leaking than the cam seal.  I eventually threw the gasket out and went to Ultra Black no leaks then.

Now if only that would work for our distributor flange to head surface.  I can't seem to get mine to stop dribbling.  Sorry, don't mean to hijack this thread!

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