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Rattle can alternatives...tried any?


Hodgepodge
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I'm still waiting on a few parts before I start tearing up/fixing my '75 2002, but of course, that doesn't keep me from thinking about things.....at the moment, it is paint.  

 

I'm planning on painting/repainting everything I can in the original 060 Polaris Silver metal flake except....unlike the original controversial paint, this stuff will actually work this time.   Apparently, the Polaris Silver rattle cans are no longer available from BMW so I need to come up with an alternative. I have a couple of air gun sprayers used with a compressor, but have developed pretty good skill with rattle cans (or have been really lucky) and have had nice results with bumper covers, truck bumpers and wagon rear hatches.  But I don't think using a rattle can with BMW Polaris Silver is an option here. (Unless somebody is away of an exact match 

 

I would probably just use a gravity feed sprayer, except these are tight spaces.  The fender wells in the engine compartment, for example, would be really tough to paint with a gravity sprayer because the hoses will get in the way. And there are areas were I will need to turn the sprayer at an angle or, when under the car, shoot straight up.   I also don't like to use the air gun sprayers for this kind of thing because there is so much set up and clean up.  With a rattle can, all you do is clean up the spot to be painted, spray, then turn the can upside down and spray to clear the paint from the nozzle and put the can back on the shelf.   I can already tell there are going to be a lot of little jobs here. 

 

Has anyone successfully used a pressurized bottle sprayer?   They seem fairly inexpensive and fairly easy but I don' know if they work.   Home Depot even sells one called Preval.    

 

preval-airless-paint-sprayers-0227-64_1000.thumb.jpg.c6e80aa560a7cb2686534cc26de929e7.jpg

 

The bottles can be reused or disposed of and tips, pickup tubes, propellant, etc. can be replaced.  I can buy a quart of the paint and that would be the equivalent of, what, 3 rattle cans?  OK, better buy a gallon.  Even THAT would be cheaper than buying the equivalent number of rattle cans from a BMW supplier. 

 

What have you used?   How well did it work?   

 

As always, I appreciate your input. 

 

Thanks,

 

Scott

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Since I received my race car back from paint.....and some things that needed painting that somehow didn't get painted (no comment) specifically the rear wheel wells and under side of car, I had to take care of myself before I could start re-assembly.  Personally, I would never shoot the exterior of a car with rattle can paint, although I have seen an example of where it was done and you would be hard pressed to tell the difference.  The main thing (from what I have learned) is the quantity of paint that comes out of the can.  Essentially you have to put down at least three good coats to get similar thickness (and some of that depends on how you paint).  Because of the propellant needed to spray the paint the paint is thinned...enough of that.

 

The Preval sprayers have worked really well for me. I used Eastwood Rust Encapsulator which is a matte black color, somewhere between flat and satin.  I really like the look it gives.  Also, it comes out of a quart can slightly thicker than stain so I didn't need to think it to shoot it out of the Preval.  I also used it inside the doors to seal those up and remarkably enough it has nearly the same sheen as the black paint my painter used on the interior (hell, who knows, maybe that is what he used?).  I have a good solid three coats on the areas I have painted and very happy, but then its just wheel wells and underside.... Whatever you shoot out of the Preval you just need to make sure the material is reduced/thinned enough for it to work properly.  It isn't expensive like you said and probably worth a go.

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 I haven't used the Preval system as I have several Badger air brushes bought over the years a garage sales you can get excellent results with the Badger and I don't see why the Preval system wouldn't work but I don't know if you can adjust the spray pattern with that system, but that being said their are company's that will mix and put factory matching colors into rattle cans and I've had good results using them under the hood although they are not cheap but any thing with real automotive paint in it will be somewhat expensive.

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8 minutes ago, Son of Marty said:

 I haven't used the Preval system as I have several Badger air brushes bought over the years a garage sales you can get excellent results with the Badger and I don't see why the Preval system wouldn't work but I don't know if you can adjust the spray pattern with that system, but that being said their are company's that will mix and put factory matching colors into rattle cans and I've had good results using them under the hood although they are not cheap but any thing with real automotive paint in it will be somewhat expensive.

+1.  No experience with Badger, there is no adjustibility with the Preval system (above).  They actually just did dome out with an air brush kit as well that has its own propellant, no personal experience with that but have read some reviews and apparently works pretty well.

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44 minutes ago, Son of Marty said:

 I haven't used the Preval system as I have several Badger air brushes bought over the years a garage sales you can get excellent results with the Badger and I don't see why the Preval system wouldn't work but I don't know if you can adjust the spray pattern with that system, but that being said their are company's that will mix and put factory matching colors into rattle cans and I've had good results using them under the hood although they are not cheap but any thing with real automotive paint in it will be somewhat expensive.

Son of Marty, 

 

I used to have a couple of badger systems also but they are long gone.  I think it would be difficult to get three consistent, even coats with a badger even with the fine controls they provide. To misuse the analogy, just too fine of a brush to be doing relatively broad brush work.     The companies that put factory paint into rattle cans typically charge about $25 a can for it.  I've used them before.  One problem is that Polaris Silver seems to be a fairly rare color and I've only found a few places that will mix it, usually in quart or gallon cans.  I haven't found anyone that will put it in c can.  And by the time I get there, I think I'm already at the level of this Preval system.    

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1 hour ago, markmac said:

Personally, I would never shoot the exterior of a car with rattle can paint, although I have seen an example of where it was done and you would be hard pressed to tell the difference.  The main thing (from what I have learned) is the quantity of paint that comes out of the can.  Essentially you have to put down at least three good coats to get similar thickness (and some of that depends on how you paint).  Because of the propellant needed to spray the paint the paint is thinned...enough of that.

 

 

Marcmac,

 

That wheel well looks great! 

 

I understand what you mean about shooting panels. Fortunately, that's not what I'll be doing here. When most people think of rattle cans, they think of graffitti or really crappy paint jobs.  I've done a few body panel paint projects with them and, after putting down primer, 3 coats of color and 3 coats of clear, you really could not tell it was a rattle can job....or even a respray in some cases.  It's all about doing it in a professional way. Here's the back hatch of one of my previous E39 wagons that I replaced and sprayed with factory color in paint cans.  It isn't a great image, but except for the missing 528i badge, you really couldn't tell it isn't original.   

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And here is the front of my old '99 E36 convertible.  I missed a deer and hit a berm, ripping up the front bumper cover, lights and grill.  Took the huge insurance check and did the work myself. The front pumper cover requires different prep and paint and in this case I did not clear coat it, but it still looked like a pro job when I was done.  

 

DSC_1382.thumb.JPG.b20d71c13194542c558f91b7411a4717.JPG

 

I'm not suggesting that rattle can painting is ever the best way to go, but in a pinch or in tight quarters, especially in areas that don't require clear coat, it is a good option.  (I only used cans here because my big compressor was broken.)  I'm really hoping these little spray bottle kits work. 

 

Thanks,

 

Scott

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Hodgepodge
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12 minutes ago, Hodgepodge said:

Marcmac,

 

That wheel well looks great! 

 

I understand what you mean about shooting panels. Fortunately, that's not what I'll be doing here. When most people think of rattle cans, they think of graffitti or really crappy paint jobs.  I've done a few body panel paint projects with them and, after putting down primer, 3 coats of color and 3 coats of clear, you really could not tell it was a rattle can job....or even a respray in some cases.  It's all about doing it in a professional way. Here's the back hatch of one of my previous E39 wagons that I replaced and sprayed with factory color in paint cans.  It isn't a great image, but except for the missing 528i badge, you really couldn't tell it isn't original.   

SCH_2636.thumb.JPG.1c60f9b67952014d42abd1daf357f48e.JPG

 

And here is the front of my old '99 E36 convertible.  I missed a deer and hit a berm, ripping up the front bumper cover, lights and grill.  Took the huge insurance check and did the work myself. The front pumper cover requires different prep and paint and in this case I did not clear coat it, but it still looked like a pro job when I was done.  

 

DSC_1382.thumb.JPG.b20d71c13194542c558f91b7411a4717.JPG

 

I'm not suggesting that rattle can painting is ever the best way to go, but in a pinch or in tight quarters, especially in areas that don't require clear coat, it is a good option.  (I only used cans here because my big compressor was broken.)  I'm really hoping these little spray bottle kits work. 

 

Thanks,

 

Scott

 

 

 

 

 

Nice work.  Lost the clear coat on my LR Disco and thought about rattle canning it myself, unfortunately ran out of time and real estate with the weather, we had 80's and 90's here in the SF Bay last week, pretty sure that is gone now so it will be our relatively mild winter pattern (lets hope), still not suitable for painting a hood or any other substantial part of a car.  I am guessing someone (somewhere) will fill a custom can with Polaris (no ideas on who that might be but I am sure someone would do it).  I had a Polaris tii once upon a time, great color.  Good luck with your project.

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The biggest problem with rattle cans is the paint formulation. You should be using  2 pack, catalysed paint on car bodies and that is tricky (but not impossible) to get in aerosol form. Regardless of paint, refinishing your car is a lot of work. It would seem a waste to do all of that but be held back by the paint and the delivery method. Definitely OK for out of the way bits and a choice between that, or staying unpainted but there is no way I would take on major paintwork with rattle cans. 

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I've used the Preval system more than a few times--the main advantage is that you can spray touchup paint taken from a can (and thinned, of course) without the expense of having it specially packaged in a rattle can.  You will get the same results as you would with a rattle can, so the quality of your work will depend on your skill and experience with a rattle can.  

 

When I was repainting my Bugeye--changing the color from white to red, I used a Preval to paint the shift lever housing and a lot of the interior where it was partially hidden by rubber mats and upholstery panels.  Worked just fine, and even the shift housing (which is very visible on a Sprite) came out looking very nice.  It's not a substitute for a proper spray gun or even an airbrush, but it's a lot more economical than pre-packaged special colors--or when you can't find the color you want in a rattle can.

 

mike

 

 

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21 minutes ago, mike said:

I've used the Preval system more than a few times--the main advantage is that you can spray touchup paint taken from a can (and thinned, of course) without the expense of having it specially packaged in a rattle can.  You will get the same results as you would with a rattle can, so the quality of your work will depend on your skill and experience with a rattle can.  

 

When I was repainting my Bugeye--changing the color from white to red, I used a Preval to paint the shift lever housing and a lot of the interior where it was partially hidden by rubber mats and upholstery panels.  Worked just fine, and even the shift housing (which is very visible on a Sprite) came out looking very nice.  It's not a substitute for a proper spray gun or even an airbrush, but it's a lot more economical than pre-packaged special colors--or when you can't find the color you want in a rattle can.

 

mike

 

 

Agree on all of that 100%.  My car was shot in epoxy primer, the only places I used it were in the wheel wells and underside and really I was pleased + its a race car so those areas are going to take something of a beating over time.  My experience was/is that it has just a bit of 'texture' to it which you don't get with a typical rattle can or obviously with an air brush or gun.  Again , perfect for a wheel well and the little bit of sheet metal underside (my car has no undercoating or anything like that on it).

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I've used the preval sprayers for lacquer touchups on cabinets quite a bit and have never really been super happy with results. My new lacquer supplier has an omni fill machine and now for $8 I can have any paint put into a spray can for touchups. You could probably call around to a few Woodfinishing suppliers and find someone with the machine. ab9daf0f1a8222332fe4e315bc08d37a.jpg

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Personally, I just hate the nozzle.  There's no airflow, so no control over anything other than

'splort of material'.  I tried a similar thing with solids, and by the time I was done, it looked OK,

but for the hassle and expense, just dragging out the paint gun would have been better.

 

I painted a door latch with an airbrush.  It took forever.  I never tried that again.

 

For metallic, I wouldn't attempt anything but a proper gun. That's me.

 

And yes, I have an ancient, 1st gen HVLP Sharpe gravity feed.  It works fine for things like that.

Sometimes you spin the air horns 90 degrees, and do all the 'side' stuff, but as long as you don't try

shooting upside down, or on your side for more than one short pass, it does fine.

 

Esty's paint supplier in San Diego is a very good place to buy material for things like this-

their better stuff handles fine, looks good, and costs a fraction of what a comparable material/system

would be over the counter.

 

whut I got,

t

 

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What about an inexpensive HVLP turbine based painter?

 

There's a thread on JalopyJournal were a bunch of folks had good luck with the $450 set here: http://www.turbineproducts.com/hvlp-systems/

 

Never mind - I just reread the original post and it sounds like you're looking for painting in tight spots and upside down.  

 

 

 

Edited by g_force
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