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Which head gasket set?


2double02
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My 2002 is seeping a little oil at the head gasket near the front timing cover. I'd like to tackle it this fall. It's a 1976 but it has a rebuilt engine not original to the car. Head is stamped E12 72. There seem to be a few head gaskets depending on chassis number. Can someone point me to the right head gasket kit based on the stamping on my head?  Is the Victor Reinz product decent?

 

Many thanks!

 

Brad

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...but this is not something you need to pull the head for, if the rest of the gasket is

working ok.  You can pull the upper cam sprocket cover, lift the edge of the head gasket,

get sealant under it, push it back down, and seal above it.  That almost always does it.

 

If it's really bad, I've even cut the thing- it's tough, so you have to mean it.

 

Often, it'll really be leaking at the valve cover, as Andrew says- you can have the cam sprocket

cover recut- measure carefully- or just use rtv.  Oil- resistant rtv.  Permatex Ultra Black, for me.

 

This area isn't under any pressure, so all you need to do is get it clean, sealed well, and

tightened evenly.  It'll leak like a sumpitch if you tighten the six bolts to the head before the 2 to the

lower cover,  And it'll leak worse if you do it the other way!

 

heh

 

t

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Thanks for the advice guys. I am under the impression the leak is at a pressure point of the head gasket near the front stud on the exhaust side. I cleaned it up and observed oil seeping from the nub just behind the timing cover. Here is a pic with the leak area  highlighted.  I may try re-torquing the head studs. 

IMG_9260.JPG

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I'm not convinced it's a head-bolt or gasket issue. Very likely just your upper timing cover.

 

I'd do as Toby suggested, remove the cover, wipe/degrease, apply RTV sealant, and evenly re-torque everything. THEN see if you have any additional leaks. 

 

Any leaks around the front of the engine get blown around/backwards by the fan, which can obscure the actual leak location. Along that train of thought... i see the front of your upper timing cover ALSO has oil on it, which would point to your valve cover not fully sealing, and oil is dripping down and getting blown around the corner, contributing to your problem. 

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You might as well try to reseal the timing cover with a dab or RTV as everyone said above, then when you remount it just lightly snug the 6 horizontal bolts by hand ( I use a 1/4" socket and a extension with no ratchet hand tight) then torque down the 2 vertical bolts to seat the back corner of the cover to the lower part then torque the last 6 and your done

Edited by Son of Marty
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What you've circled (boxed? rhomboided?)isn't a pressure point.

 

From what I've seen, you've got a leak right at the front lower chain cover.

If you pull the upper cover, you'll find a smallish hole in the head gasket, designed for

sealant to be spooged in.

 

Clean, clean, clean (don't worry about kinking the head gasket) and then reseal, paying

really close attention to getting the upper sprocket cover sucked down and into that corner.

 

Bet that fixes it, for the cost of the 2 cover gaskets and a tube of UltraBlack.

 

my internet opinion.

 

t

 

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8 hours ago, arminyack said:

that should be filled with sealant

Absolutely not!  Those weep holes are to show if there is coolant leakage and plugged will push coolant into the oil. They are outlets from that groove internal to those holes.  The main coolant flow from the pump goes thru the inner hole.  If there is a bad gasket on the coolant side, I'd want to know about it, not let it push thru into the oil.

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My mistake.  When "weep holes" were stated, I got mentally sidetracked and didn't read the rest of the sentence correctly.  The holes in the head gasket are at the intersection of the head, upper and lower front covers.  Weep holes are leak offs.  I've dealt with leak offs in the heat exchanger business and are there to tell of a problem.

The groove with the leak off points should be carefully kept un filled with gasket goop or they won't be of much use.

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