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4-speed shift linkage and the pedal box.


Hodgepodge
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Today I got the car up on a lift over at my mechanic's.  No seriously bad news, but a few oddities.   

 

Oddity #1:  When I first drove the car, I noticed the shift linkage hits the side of the transmission tunnel sometimes.  And when I throw it into 4th, I can feel the vibration from a piece of the linkage actually touching the drive shaft.  So some adjustment is in order.  With the car lifted, I see that it looks like a cover or something is missing.  I can see the shifter boot from under the car and all of the shifter linkage parts look awfully low.   I searched the site for insight into this, but I didn't find much.   See images below.   What's missing?  

 

Oddity #2.  Another cover issue, this time the pedal box.  When I sit in the car and look straight down to the accelerator pedals.  I can see through to the street near the pivot point for the accelerator and pedals.  This is not because of rust. There is a cover missing.  I took a shot of the cover that is there, but you can see something is missing.  Any idea what?   

 

My big, big project for the next week or three will be getting 30 years of grease and oil off the bottom of the car and resolving the active leaks that are happening.  There are LOT of leaks.  Engine valve cover and timing chain gaskets, maybe the lower pan gasket, master cylinder, booster, rear diff, rear brake drum pistons to name just a few.   Then I'll be able to start working on things like CV boots, bushings, etc. Oh boy! 

 

Please take a look at the images below and let me know what is missing....or if nothing is missing, what I'm missing.     

 

Thanks,

 

Scott

 

 

 

 

 

 

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21 minutes ago, halboyles said:

It sounds like you need to completely rebuild your shift tower and probably replace the transmission mount.  As far as the pedal box hole goes, get some aluminum duct tape and tape it up for now.

+1

You are not supposed to be able to see the shifter boot.  There is a thick round piece of foam doughnut to insulate and seal the shifter from the engine/transmission noise and fumes.  Also, try to figure of if you have an early or late style shifter.  The rebuilt kits and process are slightly different depending on the style.

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Thats a "late model" shifter linkage. As mentioned, there is a high density foam doughnut that goes between the body and the shifter platform on the trans. There is also a foam insert that goes in the pedal box from the interior side, still readily available. There is also an exterior pedal box cover, also of of foam, also still available. 

 

I see that the upward strut arm on the shifter platform is bent. It is possible the whole platform is canted back (or down) towards the drive shaft. Compound slop in the shifter linkage MIGHT let it touch the DS, but in 30+ years Ive never seen that. I have seen bent platforms allow the linkage to hit the DS (or totally hammered platform bushings, there are 3). Be sure to get the bushings for the platform as well as the linkage bushings. 

 

Oh- and the good news? While it may be possible to do the platform bushings insitu- you, or your mechanic, will curse for days trying to do it. Far easier with the trans out (also a great time to attend to the shifter rod seal, output & input flange seal). The trans comes out very easily, so Id just do that to tackle all those issues. 

Edited by 1974_Verona
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15 minutes ago, 1974_Verona said:

Oh- and the good news? While it may be possible to do the platform bushings insitu- you, or your mechanic, will curse for days trying to do it. Far easier with the trans out (also a great time to attend to the shifter rod seal, output & input flange seal). The trans comes out very easily, so Id just do that to tackle all those issues. 

 

Verona,

 

Well, that's interesting and perhaps both good and bad.  While I know that this gearbox is in pretty good shape, I have been thinking that if I need to remove it for any reason, I might want to  replace it with one of the rebuilt, readily available and not-insanely-expensive 5-speeds.   Although I am comfortable working on most elements of these cars, I've never pulled or installed a gearbox and am not sure I could get the car up high enough in my garage to do it.  Fortunately, there are a couple of really good BMW mechanics not too far away. I plan on doing as much of everything myself as I can and then farming out the stuff I can't do.  

 

I have a long list of to-do items before I get to this, but I WILL get to it.  The underrside of this car is SO dirty right now, I am not looking forward to getting under it.  

 

Upward strut arm is bent?  Which one is that?  Is it shown on the RealOem page here?   RealOEM Shift Lever  

 

Thanks,

 

Scott

    

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You don't need to pull the trans to do all of this, drop the driveshaft off the end of the gearbox, let the box down slightly with a jack and the put a jack stand under the box to support it. If you really want to clean up everything, remove the gearshift lever, Undo the circlip on the bottom and the one on the top, slide the lever up out of the way.  Now you can check the 2 8mm allen head bolts that should be loctited into the trans housing. These hold the shift platform up and generally come loose after a while  With all of this out of the way, easy to do the shifter seal and the trans output shaft seal   Also look at the speedo seals and the reverse lite switch    all prone to leaking.  The support bar does look like it took a little hit but no big deal, take it off and starighten it, the holes are a little elongated so they is some adjustment, push the shifter platform up so it is quite snug to the top of the tunnel ( after fixing the 2 allen head bolts and installing the foam ) and tighten it, use new locknuts on everything  Loctite the driveshaft bolts Get a piece of foam from a foam shop that will stand up to the elements as best as possible and just cut it out with a pair of scissors. If you don't take the shift lever out, just cut a slot in the foam and slide up into place.  The car will be much quieter.

 

Thanks, Rick

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#19 looks bent in the #2 pic as mentioned by Mark. Stephers points are all correct, I’m just too spoiled by having lifts I guess. I get the sentiment about a 5 speed “paying for itself”, but that has to be a figurative term? Trans, driveshaft, fabricating the shift platform, welding/bolting tunnel ears, etc? You’d have to drive it 100K miles before you earned that back ?

Edited by 1974_Verona
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While you're in there, replace the original, wimpy tranny mount with one from an E21 320i or a Bavaria.  Much larger and sturdier so will last longer.  You'll need to ream out the mounting hole on the tranny crossmember to accommodate the larger stud, but otherwise it fits just fine.  

 

I replaced the shift platform bushings without even removing the driveshaft.  Took some weaseling and new vocabulary, but I got it done.  And don't forget the bushings in the shift platform bracket.  All the above is known as "mission creep."

 

Happy wrenching

mike

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