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Oil Pump Installation

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6 hours ago, PaulTWinterton said:

The upside to the loose sprocket is that it's very easy to access.  I only have knowledge of the 3-bolt version, but I'd say you shouldn't have any problem sorting this with help of the FAQ.  Once you've addressed the slop in the sprocket also confirm that your chain only deflects horizontally approx 5mm (side-to-side).  A common occurrance is "chain rattle" as the loose chain slaps the oil relief valve housing.  Easily remedied by adding shims under the pump support and/or replacing the chain and (maybe) the sprocket.

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Edit: Just noticed the text in the photo says "Chain shimmed", it should say "Pump shimmed".

Looks like there ay have been more than “slop” going on.

 

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Wow, what a flurry of very helpful responses!  Thank you!  So, removed the nut, sprocket and. . .no shim!  The sprocket's pretty worn on one side, perhaps due to the missing shim and lateral lash.  So, new sprocket, nut and shim.  Any suggestions as to a vendor for all 3 items.  I see the sprockets pretty readily available but, so far, not the nut and shim.

Thanks again for all your suggestions!

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7 hours ago, tme said:

Looks like there ay have been more than “slop” going on.

 

Sprocket is fine, oily/dirty texture just looks suspect.  Good eye though.

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4 hours ago, Marblehead said:

due to the missing shim and lateral lash.

 

Okay, let's not get our parts confused.  Nut, sprocket and "shim (07119932634)" on the shaft.  That shim thickness will help align the chain with the sprocket.  Probably any steel washer with the correct spec would suffice.  I would also add a lock washer under the nut for safety.  

 

If your nut and sprocket is not really damaged, you could probably fit a new shim/washer and torque the nut.  If it's tight and aligned you might be fine.  Double check the slack in the chain to confirm that it is not hitting the tube.  To take up chain slack  "spacer plates" (11411250427 - 1141125048) can be used on the base of the pump.

 

 

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I just did a quick check of all the main suppliers and it looks like no one is carrying the nut or washer    You can use a steel washer for the shim washer ( does not really have to be hardened. The nut is a thin nut, like a jam nut.  10 X 1.0   You cannot put a lock washer on here, not enough room.  I have done lots of these with this setup. just make sure that you put red loctite on the nut before final assembly   Bellmetric sells the jam nuts  I keep a number od different size jam nuts around    PIA when you need one and have to order it     The jam nut is the same one used on the brake pedal rod from pedal to booster     rh thread   (I also keep LH thread jam nuts around as well

 

The sprocket seems easily available

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Again, thank you all for your encouraging and helpful replies.  Think I may have sourced all 3 items via Maximillian Imports but we'll wait and see if they can make it good. . .Gonna replace that sprocket as a precautionary measure because it is pretty worn on the backside.  I'll shoot a pic and post it here.  Also, it looks as though the previous builders staked the nut to the shaft though, fortunately, it extracted okay!  Gonna go back and examine further the chain tension, inspecting those potential wear points around the pump housing, etc..

Thanks again and stand by!

 

 

 

 

Wow, what a flurry of very helpful responses!  Thank you!  So, removed the nut, sprocket and. . .no shim!  The sprocket's pretty worn on one side, perhaps due to the missing shim and lateral lash.  So, new sprocket, nut and shim.  Any suggestions as to a vendor for all 3 items.  I see the sprockets pretty readily available but, so far, not the nut and shim.

Thanks again for all your suggestions!

image0.jpeg

image1.jpeg

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(edited)
2 hours ago, Marblehead said:

Gonna go back and examine further the chain tension, inspecting those potential wear points around the pump housing, etc.

 

Additional data points / opinions:

  • given the wobble that sprocket had, include “inspect pump shaft splines” on your list of things to check
  • a hardened ‘shim’ behind the sprocket is wise (I’ve taken apart M10’s which had non-hardened washers in this location and noted how they deformed)
  • Ireland Engineering has ‘crimped’ version of the nut - best I’ve seen for this application.
  • when shimming the oil pump for chain tension, suggest rotating the crank (if you can) and check tension at different points (you’d think the chain play wouldn’t change, but I find it often does). -KB

 

Edited by kbmb02
-

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And thank you, "K-Fish" for your further advise!  I'm all in with the hardened washes and saw an earlier post cautioning against a conventional steel one.  And the shaft splines look friendly still.  Once I get the new sprocket in place, I'll give the crank a hand spin and check everything out as it rotates.

Thanks again!

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The good people at Ireland Engineering (Patrick, to be specific), have found a shim/washer and are sending it to me!  Thank you IEM for all your help and everybody else stand by as I get into this further.

 

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New sprocket, flat washer and nut (not in that order!) and the gear wobble is history!  Thanks Ireland Engineering once more.😁

Anybody know the torque for the nut?  Can't find it in my records anywhere. . .

 

 

 

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And while I have anybody's attention, does anyone know if the alternator mounting in the pic appears correct? Is it supposed to slide freely on it's pivot point or is there some kind of spacer that goes in between the mounting bracket tabs?  My research doesn't show a spacer but I'm also wondering if I have the correct alternator for the car. . .Also, I'm replacing the rubber bushings in hopes of tightening the mounting.  The alternator rode on the mounting slightly tilted, leading me to replace the bushings.  Thoughts?

 

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41 minutes ago, Marblehead said:

Anybody know the torque for the nut?  Can't find it in my records anywhere. . .

It is M10x1 nut. assuming it is grade 8 at minimum and nut comply to DIN 985 std, should be able to torque to 4.7Kpm or 33.9 ft-lb. It probably won't hurt to add dab of blue loctite

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That is not the correct alternator,  the mount should fit perfectly between the ears on the mount.  You can align the pulley and install spacers on BOTH sides of the alternator to keep it in the correct location if it is working ok.  If you leave it like this the alternator can move and cause you to toss the fan belt (most likely at the worst possible time) 

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