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Best way to remove paint on entire car?


Z3M
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Is it orbital sander, chemicals, something else?    The car has only two coats of paint and not real rust on any of the panels, etc..  I think a orbital would be just fine, but would like to know what others have done.  Thanks!

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This topic is about my future since my 1970 has a lot of surface rust. From what I have found removing everything from the car and having it media blasted takes care of 99% of the paint. I have been quoted $800 to $1200 and that is a bargain if you value your time. Hand sanding and grinding will take up a ton of your time. You could have the car chemical dipped but that i have not checked into as of yet. 

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I've done a full strip-down to bare metal on two cars and each time, I took it to a bead blasting facility.  It removes every last speck of foreign matter in experienced hands.  I was very pleased with the results.

 

It isn't without risk, however.  Panels can be warped if one is not careful, and they're the annoying kind - ripples and waves that are difficult to correct.  I think I paid around $400 but that was twenty years ago.  SF Bay Area, at that, where I expect things are more expensive than average.

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3rd vote for blasting-

carefully, by someone known to be good.

It's kind of expensive now, but it's worth it.

 

Mechanical stripping is awful, and

chemical stripping is worse- with the added

joy of paint failure when some stays on a panel.

 

I've done it all 3 ways.

 

t

 

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The Air Force has used dry ice blasting for many years to remove paint from its aircraft when they're undergoing depot overhaul.  If it doesn't damage the relatively soft aluminum skin on an aircraft, it should be fine on steel.  And I'm sure the process is available commercially.  

 

Haven't seen water blasting before--it looks like a very powerful pressure washer...

 

mike

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Just looking on line here in Washington about dipping and it looks like a 02 would run 3 to 4.5k to have the whole car dipped, neutralized, dipped in rust preventer and epoxy primed including pick up and delivery. It looks like a great way to go but thats a ton of money just to get to where you can start body work.

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46 minutes ago, Son of Marty said:

Just looking on line here in Washington about dipping and it looks like a 02 would run 3 to 4.5k to have the whole car dipped, neutralized, dipped in rust preventer and epoxy primed including pick up and delivery. It looks like a great way to go but thats a ton of money just to get to where you can start body work.

 

Here are some other prices: I checked Metaldipping.com they are affiliated with Metalworks in Eugene, OR. Here is a link to their price list for 2002

http://metaldipping.com/?page_id=2809

 

But this is dipping only.

(scroll down the page for E10 pricing) 

 

I would think 3-4K for door to door pickup and delivery service , dipping plus epoxy primer is a pretty good price. 

 

Cheers. 

 

 

 

Edited by Vicleonardo1
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Take into consideration how much rust is or may be present, amount of bondo in repairs, etc., as some methods are better than others for removing what is under the paint. My car was media blasted, and I've continued to find media in the weirdest places. I found on other parts that the OEM primer just laughs at DIY chemical stripping with professional-grade "aircraft" stripper, and sometimes wondered if it would be best to just sand to that layer.

 

One option that is never discussed and was recommended to me by a top restoration place, is using razor blades (!), yes, it works.

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Blasting a car with razor blades?  Oh, yes, it's April 1, isn't it?

 

heh

 

Yes, mechanical scraping with a sharp edge can work.  Super slow, though.

 

Point well- made about rust, repairs, filler, etc.  A really good blasting place starts with

mild media, then uses more aggressive media as problems are exposed.  You pay for this.  But only once.

 

And yes, the media gets into places you didn't know were there.  Or went through to...there???

 

t

 

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The right kind of water blasting is really good, perhaps the best way. It uses small amount of water blast at very high pressure and supersonic speed. Theres no remains of "media" left anywhere and the result is absolutely clean. For me blasting took a whole day and it wasn't cheap but it was worth it.

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9 minutes ago, Tommy said:

The right kind of water blasting is really good, perhaps the best way. It uses small amount of water blast at very high pressure and supersonic speed. Theres no remains of "media" left anywhere and the result is absolutely clean. For me blasting took a whole day and it wasn't cheap but it was worth it.

 

Some use Dry Ice as media. Very expensive and inefficient. But the media sublimates away. Mostly used in industrial applications where any residual is a no-no (no one likes to find bits of sand in their chicken pot pie) or you are blasting an aluminum airplane. 

 

Some also use plain old ice as media. The residual is water. It just may get blasted into a place where water isn't supposed to go and start a rust issue there. 

 

Cheers! 

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