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Stuck Clutch


Dake

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My 02 sat in a garage for a year while I was out of state. Upon my return the clutch was soft and the transmission wouldn't shift. It has an E21 5 speed swap.

 

I'd dealt with a frozen flywheel on an MG Midget, so I promptly started it in gear with no gas; it started and I could coast shifts, but the clutch was still stuck. I tried lifting the rear end, starting the car in gear, and slowly applying brakes and gas at the same time; nothing changed. With the Midget I started it in fourth gear, gas to the floor, and that broke it loose; this didn't work on the 02.

 

It has fluid but the clutch is soft. It was a daily driver when I parked it (I've learned a lesson there!).

 

What should my next steps be?

Edited by Dake

1969 2002

Doubles as a work bench and lunch table

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If the clutch is soft you won't unstick it. You need to fix the hydraulics first to allow you to compress the spring on the clutch as this will be holding the clutch to the flywheel rather than the corrosion.  

 

When this is done, all of the usual techniques can be used. In fact you may even find that it isn't stuck to the flywheel. 

rtheriaque wrote:

Carbs: They're necessary and barely controlled fuel leaks that sometimes match the air passing through them.

My build blog:http://www.bmw2002faq.com/blog/163-simeons-blog/

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Yeah, and with the 5- speed, you can't easily tell that the clutch mechanism's working. 

 

I too would start with the hydraulics.  The 2002 clutch is pretty resistant to sticking, relative to most

cars I've owned...

 

t

 

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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If memory serves, there is a slot on the bell housing beside the hidden push rod where you can insert a blade to make a mark on the rod and measure its travel (or not) as an assistant pushes the pedal. That might tell you if its working properly. You might want to revisit the lengthy thread from Hack about his stuck clutch.

 

Simeon: what the heck happened there?

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I had some pedal firmness when I originally posted. I let the fluid out of the clutch overnight. Tonight I began with a clutch pedal that was completely floppy and a reservoir filled to just past the clutch line. I reverse-bled the system using this video with a hand oil pump and some clear line attached to the slave cylinder bleeder screw. Once the fluid level had risen about an inch in the reservoir I sealed the bleeder screw, and I now have a pedal that's floppy all but the last inch or so of its travel. My helper said no air bubbles escaped while the reservoir level was rising.

 

What am I missing? The only difference between what I did and the video is that I started with a partially filled reservoir.

1969 2002

Doubles as a work bench and lunch table

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On 9/4/2016 at 10:16 PM, kbmb02 said:

T: This one stuck (and, indeed, I could not tell until I pulled the transmission). -KB

 

 

image.jpeg

Dude, just google Don Garletts foot injury and count your blessings  

If everybody in the room is thinking the same thing, then someone is not thinking.

 

George S Patton 

Planning the Normandy Break out 1944

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You might have to accept that there is a problem with the seals in the master cylinder or slave and you are just pushing fluid past them. If the system was dry to begin with you may need to have a few attempts at bleeding to get the air out. Give it a few more goes and see how it goes before you start replacing components. 

rtheriaque wrote:

Carbs: They're necessary and barely controlled fuel leaks that sometimes match the air passing through them.

My build blog:http://www.bmw2002faq.com/blog/163-simeons-blog/

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Yes to all that.  And if the bleeder points UP, the slave's upside- down, fwiw.
And will be HELL to bleed.  As in, it may never.

 

If it's right- side up, and you have 'some' pedal- just pump it.  A lot.  Fast.  Slow.  Stop for a beer.  Repeat.

The clutch will self- bleed after it gets travel in the system.

 

If it doesn't, you've got an issue with the master or slave, I agree with Simeon.

 

t

 

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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10 hours ago, Son of Marty said:

Dude, just google Don Garletts foot injury and count your blessings  

 

Indeed, bad things often happen when clutch components fail. That busted one was a customer car, actually - a Sachs 215 mm. They were lucky.

I'm taking it ClutchNet next week for failure analysis. -KB

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12 hours ago, TobyB said:

Yes to all that.  And if the bleeder points UP, the slave's upside- down, fwiw.
And will be HELL to bleed.  As in, it may never.

 

If it's right- side up, and you have 'some' pedal- just pump it.  A lot.  Fast.  Slow.  Stop for a beer.  Repeat.

The clutch will self- bleed after it gets travel in the system.

 

If it doesn't, you've got an issue with the master or slave, I agree with Simeon.

 

t

 

 

Well that explains some of it. My car's bleeder points skyward. Now that I know that's incorrect I have found this thread and this thread talking about how it will never bleed properly.

 

I guess my weekend project will be to flip the slave cylinder and re-bleed it the right way round. Besides accessing the bolts is there anything special about doing this, or is it as simple as rotating it 180 degrees?

 

Jerry - Me either, MGs included. Also I just moved out of Santa Rosa, small world.

Edited by Dake

1969 2002

Doubles as a work bench and lunch table

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20 hours ago, TobyB said:

Yes to all that.  And if the bleeder points UP, the slave's upside- down, fwiw.
And will be HELL to bleed.  As in, it may never.

 

If it's right- side up, and you have 'some' pedal- just pump it.  A lot.  Fast.  Slow.  Stop for a beer.  Repeat.

The clutch will self- bleed after it gets travel in the system.

 

If it doesn't, you've got an issue with the master or slave, I agree with Simeon.

 

t

 

 

Well that explains some of it. My car's bleeder points skyward. Now that I know that's incorrect I have found this thread and this thread talking about how it will never bleed properly.

 

Jerry - Me either, MGBs included. Also I just moved out of Santa Rosa, small world.

 

Edit - That was easy. I flipped the slave cylinder in a matter of minutes, re-bled, air came out, and while there is -some- pressure at the very last inch of pedal travel, it won't build pressure regardless of how much I pump. That's probably indicative of some bad seals somewhere. Since I can get a master and slave for under $100 I think I'm just going to do that.

Edited by Dake

1969 2002

Doubles as a work bench and lunch table

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