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I suspect this guy needs more than 'special tools'


Guest Anonymous

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Guest Anonymous

Thus implying that he is taking money for working on this vehicle. Is this a graduate of Columbia School of Mechanical Hacking?

I guess if you do that with a cast-iron pushrod V8 all you do is smoke the rear tires, so this guy has never seen a real engine overrev before?

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Guest Anonymous

I remember a friend's '75-ish Fiat that could hold 70 in second gear. Assuming that's a late-model BMW 6, and the rear end ratio is longish as is common in those cars, what would it be...maybe 8000rpm? It's a bit pathetic that the oil pump fell apart. I'd expect valve spring problems, but a pump shaft failure is a bit disappointing. I guess these motors aren't all they're cracked up to be.

Mike

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Guest Anonymous

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killed that engine. sounds like classic downshift mistake: looking for 4th, found 2nd while travelling kinda fast. the oil pump failure- lots of 6 cyl. engines have been experiencing chain gear retaining nut/bolt backing out and cars losing all oil pump /pressure instantly. you have about 3 seconds -tops-to shut down, or you toast the engine. That is becoming a standard preventative repair now at a lot of shops. The pump is checked, all is well and the nut/bolt is pinged so that it cannot back off. I read recently about a nice way to do it with retaining wire, etc. Same result- BMW should step up and issue a warning and recall : it is happening a lot. A really big oil pressure loss light calibrated to 15, instead of 7 pounds on top of dash is one way some guys are combatting the gear loss devastation( especially racers). In this guy's post, it sounds like something else is wrong after this event: i bet there is a bent valve or 2 or 4 from the "85 MPH in second" incident. Hell: most cars can go to 85 in second with most road-going rear end ratios. Maybe he meant 8500 RPMs- now that makes more sense to me. was this a post from a wrench at a shop?

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A synchro is not responsable for making sure you don't shift into the wrong gear. The fact that BMW's synchro made the shift indiciates its BETTER than a car which couldn't. They're not safety features, they're just crappier synchros.

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