JFINK907

Please help. Brake lines won't bleed

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So I replaced all the brakes front and back plus the lines that go from the drum to the rubber hose. I'm finally ready to bleed the brakes and get my 68 on the road. Problem is there is no fluid that will come through the lines when I try to bleed it. I tried the assisted way pumping the brakes and with gravity. Still nothing comes out the lines. Any advice what to do next? What might be wrong? 

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I assume you changed the rubber hoses?

Sorry, if that is what you meant by "replaced all the lines".

It is just that those typically swell shut, which makes bleeding difficult.

 

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I replaced the hard line up to the rubber hose. We tried getting those hoses off but we just couldn't because of the rust. Only way we saw getting them off was breaking the line connected to it on the other side and having to re-run new lines

image.jpeg

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well, unfortunately, the fact that they are rusted in place, suggests that they are very old.

Those lines can look good on the outside, but they swell shut.

It sucks, when you press the brake pedal and it forces fluid through, but the return springs on the brakes are not strong enough to push it back/release.  Anyway, there are all sorts of bad things that come with old lines.  You will need to find a way to replace them.  Peterschop introduced me to these really cool little bitty Vise Grips, which lock onto the fittings, so you do not strip them.  

https://www.amazon.com/Tools-VISE-GRIP-Locking-Wrench-Cutter/dp/B00004SBBD/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1470109338&sr=8-7&keywords=vise+grip+4

I have heard people suggest that you cut the rear rubber lines, so you can get a socket over the fitting, which is inside the trailing arm.  I replaced the four up front, but have left the rears for when I refresh the subframe... one of these days.

 

nice looking drums!  looks like progress : )

 

 

 

 

Edited by '76Mintgrun'02

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Awesome thanks for the advice! I appreciate it. And thanks it's a working progress for sure. Baby steps lol. 

 

Thanks again

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You're welcome.  I seriously love those little locking pliers.  Once gripped, you can tap on them with a hammer.  The shock will help break the fitting free.  A torch can be helpful as well, on the really stuck ones.

 

The flex lines are available in rubber, or covered in braided stainless... fwiw.

Pressure bleeding the brakes works very well.  I bought the Motive bleeder, but if I had it to do over, I would probably just rig something up using this

griots_pressurized_spray_bottle.jpg

I like that $15 sprayer a lot.  Pretty simple to make it push air into the reservoir (which is how I use the Motive).  You just have to be mindful of the fluid level and stop occasionally to fill the reservoir.

 

I should have the bleeding order for the calipers memorized, but I just search before doing it.  It is important to bleed them in the proper sequence.

Tom

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19 hours ago, '76Mintgrun'02 said:

well, unfortunately, the fact that they are rusted in place, suggests that they are very old.

Those lines can look good on the outside, but they swell shut.

It sucks, when you press the brake pedal and it forces fluid through, but the return springs on the brakes are not strong enough to push it back/release.  Anyway, there are all sorts of bad things that come with old lines.  You will need to find a way to replace them.  Peterschop introduced me to these really cool little bitty Vice Grips, which lock onto the fittings, so you do not strip them.  

https://www.amazon.com/Tools-VISE-GRIP-Locking-Wrench-Cutter/dp/B00004SBBD/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1470109338&sr=8-7&keywords=vise+grip+4

I have heard people suggest that you cut the rear rubber lines, so you can get a socket over the fitting, which is inside the trailing arm.  I replaced the four up front, but have left the rears for when I refresh the subframe... one of these days.

 

nice looking drums!  looks like progress : )

 

 

 

 

I have a pair of tiny vise grips that I use. I also cut my rubber lines so I could fit a socket over one end. It's way easier. The best thing is to spray the connection with a good amount of PB Blaster the day before. It usually helps with the struggle. That stuff really works!

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yup.  replace ALL the rubber lines.  do not skip the ones over the subframe.

 

and get a good pressure (not vacuum) bleeder.

 

it will take a lot of fluid to get all the air out.  then you will have to drive the car a bit, and rebleed all the brakes again.

 

might as well replace the clutch rubber hose while you have everything apart.  

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Ah yes, the clutch bits.  In an early 68, they were mechanical, no?

(The question of which style this car has came up in another thread, but did not get answered...)

Tom

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2 hours ago, mlytle said:

yup.  replace ALL the rubber lines.  do not skip the ones over the subframe.

 

and get a good pressure (not vacuum) bleeder.

 

it will take a lot of fluid to get all the air out.  then you will have to drive the car a bit, and rebleed all the brakes again.

 

might as well replace the clutch rubber hose while you have everything apart.  

Marshall,

 

What bleeder do you recommend? Motive? My front suspension is still in pieces so I haven't gotten to the point where I need to bleed my brakes yet. That fun comes next.

 

Mike

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7 hours ago, thinksound_mike said:

Marshall,

 

What bleeder do you recommend? Motive? My front suspension is still in pieces so I haven't gotten to the point where I need to bleed my brakes yet. That fun comes next.

 

Mike

motive.  it is also rebranded and sold under many private labels.  simple. ez.  cheap.  i have two.

 

i have also used an "EZbleed" brand.  uses air pressure from a tire or low pressure source.  works ok.  

 

many folks have tried to make their own bleeders from spare parts, but the math does not add up.  P&L exceeds just buying the inexpensive Motive.   i am a big fan of making your own tools, except when there is a reasonable commercial option.

 

 

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22 hours ago, '76Mintgrun'02 said:

I should have the bleeding order for the calipers memorized, but I just search before doing it.  It is important to bleed them in the proper sequence.

 

For bleeding the front calipers = UIO (you I owe) = Upper, Inner, Outer.

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Yes, sir.  Shop around. I got mine from BavAuto during a sale. I'm sure everyone's favorite ice cream vendor, Blunt, has them.  It makes bleeding brakes/clutch slave an easy, one-man operation.

 

Ed

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