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How do I store a used block?

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My new-to-me ’72 tii did not come with its original engine, but I was able to track down the original block and buy it.  It has not been rebuilt but looks to be in relatively good condition considering that someone saw fit to replace it. The cylinders are the original bore and the shop will refund my money if it proves to be non-rebuildable.  I don’t actually need the block, but I wanted to have it to insure that it stays with the car.  Maybe they will be reunited someday.

Since I will be storing the block indefinitely, I am looking for suggestions on how to prepare the block for storage to protect it and minimize rust. It is just the block, no head and no crankshaft, although it still has the pistons and connecting rods from when it was removed from the car over 4 years ago. (All pistons move easily in the cylinders.)

My first thought was to remove the pistons and “painting” all surfaces with a heavy oil and putting it in a plastic bag. Perhaps there is a product for this purpose that I am unaware of.

……any thoughts?

Thanks,

Tony

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It will depend on where you will be storing it.  If you have a dry garage you can do as you said and just give it a coating of oil and put it in a trash bag and seal it.  If the storage area has big temperature changes (freezing in the winter and hot in the summer)  and can get moist you should consider a heavier coating maybe even cosmoline.  Double or triple bag it and make sure it is SEALED.  It would be better if you could store it off the floor.  Remember to remove the main caps and coat the surfaces between the caps and block, also the main cap bolt holes.  Do not leave the pistons in the bores the rings will rust to the bores.  Do the same with the connecting rods. 

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It is pretty cool what a shop vac can do, to suck the air out of the bag, before knotting the top.

Air contains moisture and oxygen, which can lead to oxidation.

It seems like less air would be better, but that is just a guess.

 

EDIT: any informed opinions on whether it is better to have air space between plastic bag and the block?  Maybe a plastic bag 'balloon' that does not contact the block would be better?

Edited by '76Mintgrun'02

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Cosmoline is what I used.  (stored my block for 10 years, have it on some spare cams as well).  I am sure WD 40, Break Free and some of the others work fine as well.  Heavy duty sealed bag and you should be good.

 

http://www.alpinabmw2002.com

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Civil Aviation Authority of New Zealand uses lanolin and mineral oil for airplane parts, it'll basically be like packing it in wax

 

"Aluminium alloy extrusions should be protected in store with a lanolin and mineral oil solution in accordance with DEF STAN 80-34 and as finished details with DEF STAN 03-2"

 

https://www.caa.govt.nz/Advisory_Circulars/AC000_2.pdf

Edited by Huge2na

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8 hours ago, '76Mintgrun'02 said:

It is pretty cool what a shop vac can do, to suck the air out of the bag, before knotting the top.

Air contains moisture and oxygen, which can lead to oxidation.

It seems like less air would be better, but that is just a guess.

 

EDIT: any informed opinions on whether it is better to have air space between plastic bag and the block?  Maybe a plastic bag 'balloon' that does not contact the block would be better?

 

 

Probably better to store in an inert gas atmosphere after coating. A plastic bag with some positive pressure of a nitrogen or argon atmosphere?

 

:D

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