LB72

Fuel line failure

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I was stopped at a red light where she shut down. I was able to start her back and pull to the side of the road and shut her off. There was a strong smell of gas and then I felt some on the top of me feet. After I opened the hood and removed the air filter, I noticed the fuel line disconnected from the carbda66dadeb336530f4fe1440e8fc8cf03.jpg

After pushing the fuel line back in the carb I noticed it was real easy to pull it back out, so I gave it a twist to tighten it bit. Then I add this, (I found a yellow hair band on the sidewalk and wrapped it around the fuel line and then to the carb) to make sure it would stay long enough to make it the 6-7 miles back home. 0ab2a37412c73064bc52ed2641c73560.jpg

What would be the best way to fix this, JB weld?

Oliver

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Looks like a 1bbl solex?

 

The fitting is brass. Unscrew the chamber and take out the rest from the back. Use a rubber coated driver to grip the inside and screw out. Install new fuel line connecting tube, and replace chamber.  You should rebuild while you're at it, or consider replacing with 32/36 Weber. 

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Guest dq48

I had a beautiful '72 burn to the ground from the same issue. I now safety wire all fittings like this.

Edited by dq48

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The fitting looks like the press in style, as opposed to the threaded one in that drawing.

I see some wetness on the accelerator pump, which could just be left over from the incident, but if that is indeed weeping, then it would be time to order a kit and freshen things up.

 

I probably would add some JB to that joint.  First, I'd make sure both pieces were very clean and then I would scuff them up, to help the epoxy get a grip.  I'd probably pull the top off to prep it, so I didn't get anything inside while scuffing.  Take the fitting out of the hose and tap it in place with a small hammer.  Once it is in place, peek inside the fitting and make sure there isn't any extra epoxy.

 

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I 2nd Minty's fix, try putting the JB weld all around the brass tube a 1/8th of a inch behind the tip to keep it from getting in the fuel passage and tap it home.

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All those pressed in fittings are prone to come loose. Mine did that at Nashville TN at 02 squared. I tapped the hole for a screw in fitting. My fire caused $2500 in damage. Was on interstate and fuel sprayed over the hot manifold. Pictures are in the archives I'm sure. Luckily I had an extinguisher. 

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Rule number two , after inspecting a car for rust,  is always carry a fire extinguisher intended for gas fires

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Mint Green is correct in that the 1 bbl Solex's inlet tube is pressed in rather than threaded.  And yes, it's a potential problem at any point where you have a pressed in fuel pipe--like on the fuel pump inlet and outlet.  I had a fire in my Renault when the fuel pump outlet pipe pulled out of the body and squirted gas on the distributor.  

 

Besides the JB weld, you can stake the pipe in place by first very slightly ovalizing the end of the pipe that goes into the carb, then driving it in place with a copper or lead mallet.  Once it's in, take a sharp punch and ding the pot metal of the carb top where the pipe is inserted. It's best to do this with the top removed from the carb body and supported on a block of wood.  That worked fine on my Renault--without the JB Weld, 'cause it hadn't been invented yet!

 

And I'm gonna go out and check the carb on my '69!

 

cheers

mike

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Back when I had my 75 Beetle, I installed a fancy glass/chrome fuel filter in line between the fuel pump and Weber carb.  The filter was not a cheap one.  It came apart on one end when I had the deck lid open doing some tuning.  I got lucky and was able to turn the engine off.  

 

The 75 was originally fuel injected.  The PO didn't change the high pressure fuel lines in the engine bay and it caught fire.  The car was towed to a shop where the body was fixed and partially re sprayed.  Owner never came back for it.  A mechanics lien was placed on it and I was able to buy it from the shop owner for very little money.

 

i installed a fire extinguisher shortly after my purchase.

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First I cleaned and scuffed the fuel inlet on the carb. Then I flared the end of the brass nipple to make it snug. I added JB weld and then massaged it back into the carb with a rubber mallet. 80e03ff32501c876d61df2c773f70ad3.jpg

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