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I guess this could technically be called 2002-related, because I use this on when working on Schatzi, my ‘72 2002…

 

Where I work, we have a bench-mounted electric motor with a big old Jacobs #34 drill chuck on one end of the ½” shaft and I guess you’d call it a flywheel (6” diameter, cast iron) on the other end of the shaft. Pics attached. We use it with everything from sanding wheel drums, polishing wheels, grinding wheels, to wire bush wheels (and man, can that wire wheel brush toss a small piece across the room and into the most inaccessible places…!) The flywheel does what it’s supposed to do: adds rotational mass, so that no matter how much pressure you apply to whatever is mounted in the chuck, this old beast doesn’t slow down at all.  Anywayz, I wanted to duplicate this setup in my home shop, so I picked up a similar motor and big old Jacobs chuck, but I’m having trouble locating a suitable flywheel. I looked in McMaster-Carr, MSC, Grainger, and Googled the heck out of it, but no luck (only one I found was a 10” V-Belt pulley for an air compressor from Grainger.) Might anyone have a clue as to what the proper name for a 6” diameter, cast iron flywheel which mounts on a ½” shaft is and where I might pick one up? It’s been in the shop here at work for so long, no one even knows where it came from, let alone where they originally got it. In the meantime, I’m using a 6” aluminum pulley, which is okay, but not quite the same. Any help from you machinists out there would be greatly appreciated.

-Bob

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Buckeye,

So it's called a handwheel. Who knew?  I sure as heck didn't...

And that's why I love the FAQ!

You all have helped me on so many different levels!

Thanks again,

-Bob

 

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I love it when someone builds a tool and this is super smart! The hand wheel would allow you to quickly and easily rotate the chuck to install different tooling/attachments; hold the outer chuck and spin the wheel with your other hand. It also makes tightening all three points in the chuck (like we all do all the time right!?) fast. I'm going to try this on one of my old bench motors.

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Yes, andreb, it's a very useful tool!

I just double-checked; the hand wheel on the motor at work is cast aluminum, not cast iron.

And thanks to Buckeye, now that I know what it's called, I was able to find two 6-inchers (with set screws and keyway) for 1/2" shafts on McMaster-Carr's site ( www.mcmaster.com/ ):

#3739T28 (dished) $68.05

#3739T22 (straight) $60.78

-Bob

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Be wary though, hand wheels may not be balanced for even medium speed rotation -- they are for hand use, by definition.

 

H

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And be aware of what you find for a wheel, that it can withstand high speed.  Don't want it to fly apart and injure someone.  Castings may not be able to hold together.

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it looks similar to a flywheel from an old sewing machine.

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