Jump to content
  • When you click on links to various merchants on this site and make a purchase, this can result in this site earning a commission. Affiliate programs and affiliations include, but are not limited to, the eBay Partner Network.

clutch reassembly question


Guest Anonymous

Recommended Posts

Guest Anonymous

was wondering if anyone had any clever ideas or tricks/techniques about how to centre the clutch drive plate when re-assembling the clutch/gearbox. (i dont have a spare gearbox centre shaft lying around..)

best wishes chaps

ozgeorge

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Anonymous

Well its not really smart, But Ive done three motors this way and have had no trouble.(Other than Jarry breaking his car last week)

I take a socket that fits in he pilot bearing hole. THen I take the extension and rap it with electrical tape till it fits snuggly in the clutch disk. I tighten down the pressure plate and remove the rig. I then check it by eye to see if its straight. If not Ill go back and do it again till it is right.

NOTE: This is only if you cannot find a cluch alignment tool at the local auto store. I had one, but in my usual fasion forgot to bring it with me on 2 of the ocassions, and the third was a non BMW motor.

Good luck

Andy Rattley

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Anonymous

Clutch alignment tools are $5-$10 (Shucks/Kragen will probably get you the wrong one, call one of the 02 vendors)and are worth the money if youve ever misaligned the disk. Also, for lining up the trans to the engine I used a trick others have posted that worked like a dream. Get two long bolts of the same diameter as the ones that mate the trans & engine, cut off the heads and slot the end for a screwdriver blade. easy to do with a dremel or even a hacksaw. insert them into the block and use these as guides to line up the tranny. It will slip right on the first pass gauranteed, possibly saving you a lot of frustration lining up the input shaft. (Ive heard of people spending HOURS trying to line up the input shaft,,, ok, it was me. on another car though)there is very little room in the transmission tunnel to jocky the gearbox around and the bolts will act as guides.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Anonymous

The auto parts store didn't have one for 2002's in stock, so I found a piece of PVC pipe that was slightly larger than the openings and ground it down to fit tight. It worked much better than I expected. I've since added an input shaft to my tool box, so I tossed the pipe. 8-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    Unveiling of the Neue Klasse Unveiled in 1961, BMW 1500 sedan was a revolutionary concept at the outset of the '60s. No tail fins or chrome fountains. Instead, what you got was understated and elegant, in a modern sense, exciting to drive as nearly any sports car, and yet still comfortable for four.   The elegant little sedan was an instant sensation. In the 1500, BMW not only found the long-term solution to its dire business straits but, more importantly, created an entirely new
    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    In 1966, BMW was practically unknown in the US unless you were a touring motorcycle enthusiast or had seen an Isetta given away on a quiz show.  BMW’s sales in the US that year were just 1253 cars.  Then BMW 1600-2 came to America’s shores, tripling US sales to 4564 the following year, boosted by favorable articles in the Buff Books. Car and Driver called it “the best $2500 sedan anywhere.”  Road & Track’s road test was equally enthusiastic.  Then, BMW took a cue from American manufacturers,
    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    BMW 02 series are like the original Volkswagen Beetles in one way (besides both being German classic cars)—throughout their long production, they all essentially look alike—at least to the uninitiated:  small, boxy, rear-wheel drive, two-door sedan.  Aficionados know better.   Not only were there three other body styles—none, unfortunately, exported to the US—but there were some significant visual and mechanical changes over their eleven-year production run.   I’ve extracted t
  • Upcoming Events

  • Supporting Vendors

×
×
  • Create New...